updated: 4/13/2018

ʻŌlelo Noʻeau
Concordance

 A    E    H    I    K    L    M    N    O    P    R    S    U    W   

H

haa    hae    hah    hai    hak    hal    ham    han    hao    hap    hau    haw    he    he    hea    hee    heh    hei    hek    hel    hem    hen    heo    heu    hew    hi    hie    hih    hii    hik    hil    him    hin    hio    hiu    hiw    ho    ho    hoa    hoe    hoh    hoi    hok    hol    hom    hon    hooh    hooi    hook    hool    hoom    hoon    hoop    hoou    hoow    hop    hou    hu    hua    hue    huh    hui    huk    hul    hum    hun    hup    

haʻa  (3) 390Haʻa hoʻi ka papa; ke kāhuli nei.Unstable is the foundation; it is turning over.
 [Said of an unstable person or situation. First used by Hiʻiaka in a chant while playing kilu at the residence of Peleʻula.]
  391Haʻa ka wai o Kemamo i ka mālie.The water of Kemamo dances in calm weather.
 [Said humorously of the swish of ladies’ dresses as they walk along.]
  2746Punaluʻu, i ke kai kau haʻa a ka malihini.Punaluu, where the sea dances for the visitors.
 [Punaluʻu, Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi, is said to be the place where the sea dances to delight visitors.]

hāʻae  (1) 1992Liʻiliʻi hāuliuli, monimoni ka hāʻae.Little hāuliuli fish, makes the mouth water.
 [Said in reference to a young person who is already wise in the ways of sex and has a strong attraction for the opposite sex.]

haʻahaʻa  (2) 389Haʻahaʻa haka, pau i ka ʻīlio.The contents of a low shelf can he stolen by dogs.
 [Things carelessly left about can be stolen. First said by Kamalalawalu to Lonoikamakahiki in making fun of the short stature of the latter’s half-brother and chief steward, Pupukea.]
  1870Kuʻia ka hele a ka naʻau haʻahaʻa.Hesitant walks the humble hearted.
 [A humble person walks carefully so he will not hurt those about him.]

haʻaheo  (7) 860He ola na ka ʻōiwi, lawe aʻe nō a ʻai haʻaheo.When one has earned his own livelihood he can take his food and eat it with pride.
  1003Hilo mahi haʻaheo.Hilo of the proud farmers.
 [The climate makes the soil of Hilo very easy to till, so the farmers used to make a game of planting. They used long digging sticks to make the holes and wore lei to work. Working in unison, they made a handsome picture.]
  1152I haʻaheo nō ka lawaiʻa i ka lako i ka ʻupena.The fisherman may well be proud when well supplied with nets.
 [Good tools help the worker to succeed.]
  1492Ka nalu haʻaheo i ka hokua o ke kanaka.The surf that proudly sweeps over the nape of one’s neck.
 [Said of a wind which surges and blows from the back. A play on hokua (crest of high wave).]
  1813Kohala ʻāina haʻaheo.Kohala, land of the proud.
 [The youths, lei-bedecked, were proud of their handsome appearance and of their home district.]
  2567Pāhala, ka ʻāina lepo haʻaheo i ka maka.Pāhala, land [of those who are] proud of the dust in the faces.
 [The people of Pāhala, Kaʻū, like others of that district, are proud of their home, even though the wind-blown dust keeps their faces dirty.]
  2735Pulelo ke ahi haʻaheo i nā pali.The firebrand soars proudly over the cliffs.
 [An expression of triumph. Referring to the firebrand hurling of Kauaʻi, or to the glow of volcanic fire on Hawaiʻi.]

Haʻakua  (1) 2631Piha ʻōpala ke one o Haʻakua.The sand of Haʻakua is flled with rubbish.
 [Said of one who is untidy, or who talks nonsense. Haʻakua is under the Puʻueo end of the railroad bridge that spans the Wailuku River in Hilo, Hawaiʻi.]

hāʻale  (2) 393Hāʻale i ka wai a ka manu.The rippling water where birds gather.
 [A beautiful person. The rippling water denotes a quiet, peaceful nature which attracts others.]
  1203ʻIkea maila ʻo Mānā, ua hāʻale i ka wai liʻulā.Mānā notices the waters of the mirage.
 [The attempt to fool is very obvious.]

Haʻaleʻale  (1) 392Haʻaleʻale i ka puʻuwai.A heart full to the brim [with love].

haʻalele  (10) 85ʻAi nō ka ʻiole a haʻalele i kona kūkae.A rat eats, then leaves its droppings.
 [Said of an ungrateful person.]
  394Haʻalele ʻia i muliwaʻa.Left on the very last canoe.
 [Said of one who is left behind.]
  395Haʻalele i ka lā ka mea mahana.Has left the warmth of the sun.
 [Has died.]
  396Haʻalele i ka ʻulaʻula waiwai a koho i ka ʻulaʻula waiwai ʻole.Leaves the valuable red and chooses the worthless red.
 [Said of one who rejects a suitor of rank in favor of one of lesser station.]
  397Haʻalele i Puna nā hoaloha ʻē.Left in Puna are the friends.
 [Said of one who has deserted his friends. Originally said of Hiʻiaka when she left Puna.]
  398Haʻalele koa waʻa i koa kanaka.Thc koa canoe has departed leaving the warriors behind.
 [Said when a canoe goes off and leaves the people behind, either in the water or on land.]

more haʻalele
399Haʻalele ʻo Makanikeoe.Makanikeoe has departed.
 [Peace and love are no longer here.]

haʻalele wale  (1) 2886ʻUā a haʻalele wale.Shouted till they left off.
 [Shouted themselves hoarse.]

haʻalili  (1) 2532ʻŌpelu haʻalili i ke kai.ʻOpelu that make the sea ripple.
 [Said of active, quick-moving people.]

Haʻaloʻu  (1) 2540ʻO uakeʻe nei i loko o Haʻaloʻu, ʻo ka pō nahunahu ihu.The little bend in Haʻaloʻu (Bend-over), on the night that the nose is bitten.
 [This was said of Kahalaiʻa when he became angry with Kaʻahumanu. He was only a “little bend” whose wrath was no more important then a nip on the nose.]

haʻanui  (1) 2371ʻO Hinaiaʻeleʻele ke kāne, ʻo Pōʻeleʻi ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he keiki ʻakena a haʻanui.Hinaiaʻeleʻele is the husband, Pōʻeleʻi (Supreme-dark-one) the wife; a child born to them is a boaster and an exaggerator.
 [Said of a child born in the month of Hinaiaʻeleʻele.]

Hāʻao  (1) 1550Ka ua Hāʻao o Waiōhinu.The Hāʻao rain of Waiōhinu.
 [A poetical expression in reference to Waiōhinu in Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi. The Hāʻao rain comes down from the mountain in columns to Waiōhinu. It is mentioned in songs and chants of Kaʻū.]

hāʻawe  (6) 401Hāʻawe i ke kua; hiʻi i ke alo.A burden on the back; a babe in the arms.
 [Said of a hard-working woman who carries a load on her back and a baby in her arms.]
  559He hāʻawe pili.Carriers of bundles of pili grass.
 [A derogatory saying by the followers of Kamehameha for the people of Kaʻū, who covered the road of Kapaukua with pili grass for their chief Keouakuahuʻula.]
  1892Kū ka paila, hana ka hāʻawe.A pile has accumulated; now to carry the load.
 [Said of a big accumulation of work that requires effort to clear up. Paila is Hawaiianized from the English “pile.”]
  1901Kū ke paʻi, hana ka hāʻawe.A big heap that requires carrying on the back.
 [A heap of work.]
  1328Ka iʻa hāʻawe i ka paʻakai.The fish that carries salt on its back.
 [The mountain shrimp (ʻōpae kolo), a creature that does not die readily after being removed from the water. Once a stranger arrived at the house of a man noted for his stinginess. While the host loudly deplored his lack of any kind of meat to eat with the poi, a shrimp with a lump of salt on its back crawled out of a container in the corner. The selfish man had placed it there earlier, with the salt for seasoning, intending to eat it himself.]
  2386ʻOi hoʻi he hana hāʻawe o kaumaha.It isn’t work to carry this heavy burden on the back. It’s no trouble at all.

hāʻawi  (6) 138ʻAʻohe hale i piha i ka hoihoi; hāʻawi mai a lawe aku nō.No house has a perpetual welcome; it is given and it is taken away.
 [A warning not to wear out one’s welcome.]
  402Hāʻawi ka ʻākau, lū ka hema.The right hand gives, the left hand scatters.
 [Said of an extravagant person.]
  403Hāʻawi papa heʻe nalu.A surfboard giving.
 [To give a thing and later ask for its return. A surfboard is usually lent, not given outright.]
  1286Ka hāʻawi a ka mea hale, koe koena ʻole ma kūʻono.Giving as a house owner does, with nothing left hidden in the corners.
 [Said of a very generous person who gives freely of all he has.]
  2043Mai hāʻawi wale i ka lei o ka ʻāʻī o ʻalaʻala.Do not give a lei too freely lest a scrofulous sore appear on the neek.
 [In olden times one never gave the lei he wore except to a person closely related. Should such a lei fall into the hands of a sorcerer who disliked him, a scrofulous sore would appear on his neck. If you wish to make a present of a lei, make a fresh one.]
  2432ʻO ka pā ʻai a ka iʻa, kuhi ka lima, leʻa ka hāʻawi.With a pearl fishhook that the fish grasps, one can point with the hand and give with pleasure.
 [A good fishhook brings in enough food for the family and to give to relatives and friends.]

hae  (2) 562He hale kanaka, ke ʻalalā ala no keiki, ke hae ala no ka ʻīlio.It is an inhabited house, for the wail of children and the bark of a dog are heard.
 [The signs of living about a home are the voices of humanity and animals. Used in answer to someone’s apology over their children crying or dogs barking.]
  2600Papahi i ka hae o ka lanakila.Honor the flag of the victor.
 [Said in praise of a victorious person.]

haehae  (2) 404Haehae ka manu, ke ʻale nei ka wai.Tear up the birds, the water is surging.
 [Let us hurry, as there is no time for niceties. Kaneʻalohi and his son lived near the lake of Halulu at Waiʻaleʻale, Kauaʻi. They were catchers of ʻuwaʻu birds. Someone falsely accused them of poaching on land belonging to the chief of Hanalei, who sent a large company of warriors to destroy them. The son noticed agitation in the water of Halulu and cried out a warning to his father, who tore the birds to hasten cooking.]
  1704Keiki haehae poko o Naʻalehu.The lad of Naʻalehu who tears into bits.
 [Said in admiration of a strong warrior of Naʻalehu who fearlessly attacks his foes. Later said of a Naʻalehu-born person who shows no fear in any situation.]

Haʻehaʻe  (2) 990Hiki mai ka lā ma Haʻehaʻe, ma luna mai o Kukiʻi.The sun rises at Haʻehaʻe, above Kukiʻi.
 [Haʻehaʻe, in Puna, Hawaiʻi, is often called the gateway of the sun. Kukiʻi is a place in Puna.]
  2063Mai ka lā ʻōʻili i Haʻehaʻe a hāliʻi i ka mole o Lehua.From the appearance of the sun at Haʻehaʻe till it spreads its light to the foundation of Lehua.
 [Haʻehaʻe is a place at Kumukahi, Puna, Hawaiʻi, often referred to in poetry as the gateway of the sun.]

haele  (2) 1695Ke hele maila ko Kaʻū; he iho maila ko Palahemo; he hōkake aʻela i Manukā; haele loa akula i Kaleinapueo.There come those of Kaʻū; those of Palahemo descend; those of Manukā push this way and that; and away they all go to Kaleinapueo.
 [Said when one tries to find out something about another and meets with failure at every turn. A play on place names: ʻū (a grunt of contempt) in Kaʻū; hemo (to get away) in Palahemo; kā (to run along like a vine) in Manukā; and leinapueo (owl’s leaping place) in Kaleinapueo.]
  2225Nā kai haele lua o Kalae, o Kāwili lāua o Halaʻea.The two sea currents of Kalae — Kāwili and Halaʻea.
 [The Halaʻea current, named for an evil chief who was swept away, comes from the east to Kalae and sweeps out to sea. The Kāwili (Hit-and-twist) comes from the west and flows out alongside the Halaʻea. Woe betide anyone caught between.]

haelelua  (1) 2292Nā puʻu haelelua, o Pili me Kalāhikiola.The hills that go together — Pili and Kalāhikiola.
 [These two hills that stand together are often mentioned in chants and legends of Kohala.]

hāhā  (3) 407Hāhā pōʻele ka pāpaʻi o Kou.The crabs of Kou are groped for in the dark.
 [Applied to one who goes groping in the dark. The chiefs held kōnane and other games at the shore of Kou (now central Honolulu), and people came from everywhere to watch. Very often they remained until it was too dark to see and had to grope for their companions.]
  1329Ka iʻa hāhā i kahawai.The fish groped for in the streams.
 [The ʻoʻopu, often caught by groping under rocks and hollow places in a stream.]
  2527ʻO ʻOlepau ka mahina; ʻo palaweka ka mahina; ʻo hina wale ka mahina; ʻo hāhā pōʻele ka mahina.ʻOlepau is the moon phase; hazy is the light of the moon; quickly goes the light of the moon; one gropes in the dark.
 [Said of one who is vague or hazy in explaining his thoughts, or of one whose knowledge is vague.]

hahai  (4) 271E hahai ana nō ke kolekole i kahi nui a ka wahie, a e hahai ana no ke ʻino i kahi nui o ka paʻakai.Underdone meat follows along even where wood is plentiful, and decomposition follows along even where much salt is found.
 [Even where good is found, evil creeps in.]
  405Hahai nō ka ua i ka ululāʻau.Rains always follow the forest.
 [The rains are attracted to forest trees. Knowing this, Hawaiians hewed only the trees that were needed.]
  2641Piʻipiʻi hahai moa.Curly head followed by chickens.
 [Kahahana was a handsome, curly-haired man who was compared to a fine cock who attracts the attention of the hens. Said of any curly-haired man who has a way with women.]

hahaki  (1) 2044Mai hahaki ʻoe i ka ʻōhelo o punia i ka ua noe.Do not pluck the ʻōhelo berries lest we be surrounded by rain and fog.
 [A warning not to do anything that would result in trouble. It is kapu to pluck ʻōhelo berries on the way to the crater of Kīlauea. To do so would cause the rain and fog to come and one would lose his way. It is permissible to pick them at the crater if the first ʻōhelo is tossed into the fire of Pele. Then, on the homeward way, one may pick as he pleases.]

hahana  (1) 406Hahana ka wela.The heat was intense.
 [He or she was very angry.]

haʻi  (19) 31Aia a paʻi ʻia ka maka, haʻi ʻia kupuna nāna ʻoe.Only when your face is slapped should you tell who your ancestors are.
 [Hawaiians were taught never to boast of illustrious ancestors. But when one is slandered and called an offspring of worthless people, he should mention his ancestors to prove that the statement is wrong.]
  166ʻAʻohe komo o kā haʻi puaʻa ke paʻa i ka pā.Other people’s pigs would not come in if the fence were kept in good repair.
 [Be prepared always, and you’ll find yourself free of trouble. Also, evil influence cannot enter when one keeps his own mental realm fortified from within.]
  167ʻAʻohe laka o kā haʻi ʻīlio.Other people’s dogs do not mind you.
 [Said as a warning to beware of the gods of others.]
  238ʻAukuʻu hāpapa i ka haʻi loko.Heron groping in somebody else’s fishpond.
 [A man groping for somebody else’s woman.]
  276E hana mua a paʻa ke kahua ma mua o ke aʻo ana aku iā haʻi.Build yourself a firm foundation before teaching others.
  284E hoʻi e peʻe i ke ōpū weuweu me he moho lā. E ao o haʻi ka pua o ka mauʻu iā ʻoe.Go back and hide among the clumps of grass like the wingless rail. Be careful not to break even a blade of grass.
 [Retum to the country to live a humble life and leave no trace to be noticed and followed. So said the chief Keliʻiwahamana to his daughter when he was dying. Later used as advice to a young person not to be aggressive or show off.]

more haʻi
317E kanu mea ʻai o nānā keiki i ka haʻi.Plant edible food plants lest your children look with longing at someone else’s.

haʻi wale  (1) 840He niho haʻi wale ko ka pāpaʻi.A crab has claws that break off easily.
 [Said of one who offers to fight but backs down when the challenge is accepted.]

haiamū  (1) 408Haiamū ka manu i ka pua o ka māmane.The birds gather ahout the māmane blossom.
 [Said of one who is very popular with the opposite sex.]

haʻihaʻi  (3) 410Haʻihaʻi nā iwi o ke kolohe.Broken are the bones of the mischiefmaker.
 [Said of one who is caught in mischief and given a trouncing.]
  564He hale kipa nō lā hoʻi ko ke kōlea haʻihaʻi ʻē ʻia nā iwi.The house of a plover might have been that of a friend if one hadn’t broken his bones.
 [A stranger might have been a friend if he hadn’t been treated so shamefully.]
  1457Ka makani haʻihaʻi lau hau o Olowalu.The hau-leaf tearing wind of Olowalu.
 [A gusty wind.]

hāiki  (5) 63Aia ma kahi hāiki.Is in a nanow place.
 [Said of an unborn infant. No plans are made for it until puka na maka i ke ao (the eyes are seen in the daylight).]
  411Hāiki Kaʻula i ka hoʻokē a nā manu.There isn’t room enough on the island of Kaʻula, for the birds are crowding.
 [It is overcrowded. Kaʻula is a bird-inhabited island beyond Niʻihau.]
  1873Kū i ka hāiki, ʻaʻole ma mua, ʻaʻole ma hope.Stands in a narrnow space until nothing before and nothing behind.
 [Said of one who has nothing to fall back on and no one to help.]
  1947Lana ka ʻauwae i kahi hāiki.The chin floated in a narrow place.
 [He barely escaped.]
  2806Ua kū i kahi hāiki.Standing in a narrow place.
 [Said of one in a precarious position.]

haʻikū  (1) 412Haʻikū umauma, haʻi kū e!Follow together, follow shouting!
 [An expression used by chiefs meaning, “Let us launch our canoes and go to war whether the other side is willing or not.” This is part of a chant used while transporting newly made canoes from the upland to the sea. A group of men walking abreast carried their burden and shouted this chant.]

haipule  (1) 198ʻAʻohe ola o ka ʻāina i ke aliʻi haipule ʻole.The land cannot live under an irreligious chief.

haka  (7) 34Aia a wini kākala, a ʻula ka lepe o ka moa, a laila kau i ka haka.When the spur is sharp and the comb red, then shall the cock rest on a perch.
 [When a boy becomes a man, then shall he take a mate.]
  389Haʻahaʻa haka, pau i ka ʻīlio.The contents of a low shelf can he stolen by dogs.
 [Things carelessly left about can be stolen. First said by Kamalalawalu to Lonoikamakahiki in making fun of the short stature of the latter’s half-brother and chief steward, Pupukea.]
  413Haka kau a ka manu.Perch on which birds rest.
 [A promiscuous woman.]
  415Haka ʻula a Kāne.Kāne’s red perch.
 [A rainbow with red colors predominating.]
  819He moa kani ao ia, a pō kau i ka haka.He is a cock that crows in the daytime, but when night comes he sits on a perch.
 [Said of a person who brags of what he can do, but when difficulties come he is the first to remove himself from the scene.]
  1289Ka haka o ka moa kāne, ua kau ʻia e ka moa wahine.The perch of the cock is now occupied by a hen.
 [Said by Puna, whom Kalaniʻōpuʻu placed as governor in Hāna, Maui. Mahihelelima wanted Puna out of the way and lied that Kalaniʻōpuʻu had sent word for Puna to meet him in Hawaiʻi at once. When Puna arrived in Hawaiʻi, he discovered that he had been duped and that Kaʻuiki hill in Hāna had been taken by the Maui chiefs in the meantime. The saying was later used to mean that a superior worker had been replaced by another who was not as good.]
  2518ʻO nā ʻunihipili o Keaweʻolouha ua haʻalele i ka haka.The deified relatives of Keaweʻolouha have deserted the person they possessed.
 [A play on Keawe-ʻolo-uha (Keawe-with-the-sagging-colon), a term applied to one who is too lazy to work. Those who depended on him soon deserted.]

hakahaka  (2) 294E hoʻopiha i ka mākālua i hakahaka.Fill the hole from which the plant has been removed.
 [Find someone to replace one who has gone away or died.]
  1814Kohala ihu hakahaka.Kohala of the gaping nose.
 [Kohala is full of hills, and the people there are said to breathe hard from so much climbing.]

Hakaio  (1) 2796Ua kaʻa ʻia e Hakaio.Rolled over by Hakaio.
 [Said of a woman with a beautiful figure. Hakaio was the name of a supematural tapa beater that rolled itself over the legendary heroine Keamalu to beautify her figure after her bath.]

Hakalau  (1) 115Alu ka pule i Hakalau.Concentrate your prayers on Hakalau.
 [Whenever concentration and united effort are required, this saying is used. A sorcerer at Hakalau once created havoc in his own and other neighborhoods. Many attempts to counter-pray him failed until a visiting kahuna suggested that all of the others band together to concentrate on the common enemy. This time they succeeded.]

Hakalauʻai  (1) 146ʻAʻohe i hiki i Hakalauʻai, pae ʻē i Keolewa.Hakalauʻai was never reached, for he landed at Keolewa instead.
 [Before one could receive sufficient food for all his requirements, he found his efforts suspended. A play on Haka-lau-ʻai (Rack-for-much-food) and Ke-olewa (Suspend-in-space).]

hākālia  (1) 366E, ʻolohaka! I ke ʻehu nō o ka lāʻau pālau, kulana; hākālia nō a pāpā lāʻau aku o ka make nō ia.Say! The person is hollow. With just the passing breeze of a brandished club, he falls. As soon as a spear touches him, he dies.
 [Said by Pupukea, a chief of Kaʻū, of Makakuikalani, chief of Maui, in an exchange of insults. Later commonly used to refer to weaklings.]

hakanū  (1) 414Hakanū i nā luina Rusini.Struck dumb in the presence of the Russian sailors.
 [Speechless with awe. When the early Russian ships came, some of the Hawaiians observed them in awed silence.]

hakē  (1) 416Hakē ka paʻi ʻai o ka Malulani.The Malulani is overloaded with bundles of hard poi.
 [An impolite reference to a pregnant woman. The Malulani was an inter-island ship.]

haki  (3) 417Haki kākala o Piʻilani, ʻike pono ʻo luna iā lalo.Roughness breaks in Piʻilani, those above recognize those below.
 [A storm breaks loose and those above — rain, lightning, thunder, wind — show their effects to the people below.]
  504Hāwāwā ka heʻe nalu haki ka papa.When the surf rider is unskilled, the board is broken.
 [An unskilled worker bungles instead of being a help. There is also a sexual connotation: When the man is unskilled, the woman is dissatisfied.]
  1429Ka lālā kaukonakona haki ʻole i ka pā a ka makani Kona.The tough branch that does not break in the Kona gales.
 [Said of a sturdy, strong person.]

haki wale  (2) 702He koʻokoʻo haki wale.A staff that breaks easily.
 [A weak leader.]
  1202I ke alo nō o ka lawaiʻa lā a pūkē hewa nā leho, haki wale nā kākala.It was right in front of the fishermen that the cowry shells came together violently and the spikes broke off.
 [In spite of watchfulness, trouble occurs. The leho is a cowry-shell octopus lure fashioned with a spike on it.]

Hakipuʻu  (1) 248E aha ʻia ana o Hakipuʻu i ka palaoa lāwalu ʻono a Kaʻehu?What is happening to Hakipuu, with dough cooked in ti leaves, of which Kaehu is so fond?
 [This is a line of a chant composed by Kaʻehu, a poet and hula instructor from Kauaʻi. It refers to a part-white woman with whom he flirted. Used in humor when referring to Hakipuʻu, a place on the windward side of Oʻahu.]

hākoʻi  (1) 418Hākoʻi wai a ka neki.Water agitated among the rushes.
 [The throbbing of the heart of one in love at the sight of the object of his affection.]

hakoko  (1) 273E hakoko ana ʻo Heneli me Keoni Pulu; ua lilo ke eo iā Keoni Pulu.Henry and John Bull wrestle; John Bull wins.
 [Hunger is routed by filling the stomach. Henry (Hunger) and John Bull (Fullness) wrestle until John Bull wins the match.]

haku  (3) 532He aliʻi ka laʻi, he haku na ke aloha.Peace is a chief the lord of love.
 [Where peace is, there love abides also.]
  632He ʻimi haku.A person who seeks a lord.
 [Priests and others were known to go in search of a worthy chief to serve.]
  2127Ma loko o ka hale, hoʻopuka ʻia ka pili, a ma waho o ka hale, he haku ia.Inside of the house you may mention your relationship, but outside of the house your chief is your lord.
 [Those who served the chief in his home were usually loyal blood relatives. From childhood they were taught not to discuss the relationship with anyone outside of the household, and always to refer to their chief as Kuu haku (My lord), never by any relationship term. Only the chief could mention a relationship if he chose.]

hākumakuma  (1) 544He ao hākumakuma wale nō, ʻaʻohe ua.It is only a lowering, and there will not be any rain.
 [Said of one who frowns and glowers but does nothing to hurt.]

hala  (44) 122Anu koʻū ka hale, ua hala ka makamaka.Cold and damp is the house, for the host is gone.
 [A house becomes sad and forlorn when it is no longer occupied by the host whose welcome was always warm.]
  201ʻAʻohe pahuna ihe hala a ka Maluakele.The Maluakele wind never misses with its spear-like thrusts.
 [Said in praise of one who always gets what he is after.]
  351E mānalo ka hala o ke kanaka i ka imu o ka puaʻa.The wrongs done by man are atoned for by a pig in the imu.
 [When a person has committed a wrong against others or against the gods, he makes an offering of a hog with prayers of forgiveness.]
  379E uhi ana ka wā i hala i nā mea i hala.Passing time obscures the past.
  419Hala i Kauaʻi i Kalalau.Gone to Kalalau, on Kauaʻi.
 [Said of one who is off-course mentally or is off gadding somewhere; a blunderer. A play on lalau (to go astray).]
  420Hala i ke ala hoʻi ʻole mai.Gone on the road from which there is no returning.
 [Death.]

more hala
421Hala i ke ala koʻiʻula a Kāne.Gone on the sacred red trail of Kāne.
 [Death.]

hala ʻula  (1) 137ʻAʻohe hala ʻula i ka pō.No hala fruit shows its color in the darkness of night.
 [Beauty must be seen to be enjoyed.]

Halaʻea  (2) 1819Kō ke au iā Halaʻea.The current carried Halaʻea away.
 [Said of one who goes out and forgets to return. Halaʻea was a chief of Kaʻū who was so selfish that he demanded every fish caught by the fishermen. After years of going without fish, the fishermen rebelled. One day, the whole fleet went to the fishing grounds outside of Kalae and did not return. The chief wanted the catch and ordered a servant to go and ask for it. The servant refused, and in anger the chief went himself. When he asked for the fish the whole fleet turned the prows of their canoes shoreward. One by one the fishermen unloaded their fish onto the chief’s canoe. The canoe began to sink under the weight of the fish, and the chief cried out to the men to stop. They refused. The chief, his canoe, and his fish were swept out on the current and never seen again. This current, which comes from the east and flows out to sea at Kalae, is known as Ke au o Halaʻea.]
  2225Nā kai haele lua o Kalae, o Kāwili lāua o Halaʻea.The two sea currents of Kalae — Kāwili and Halaʻea.
 [The Halaʻea current, named for an evil chief who was swept away, comes from the east to Kalae and sweeps out to sea. The Kāwili (Hit-and-twist) comes from the west and flows out alongside the Halaʻea. Woe betide anyone caught between.]

halakā  (1) 2604Pāʻū halakā.A skirt that can be instantly removed.
 [Referring to the hand, when it is used as a shield while bathing in the ocean or a stream.]

halakau  (1) 426Halakau ka inanu i ka lāʻau.The bird perches way up high in the tree.
 [Said of a man or woman who is not easily ensnared.]

halalī  (1) 2084Mai piʻi aʻe ʻoe i ka lālā kau halalī o ʻike ʻia kou wahi hilahila e ou mau hoa.Do not climb to the topmost branches lest your private parts be seen by your companions.
 [Do not put on an air of superiority lest people remember only your faults.]

Halāliʻi  (1) 1752Ke kō ʻeli lima o Halāliʻi.The sugar cane of Halāliʻi, dug out by hand.
 [Winds blowing over this place on Niʻihau buried the sugar cane. Here and there the leaves would be seen and the people would dig them out by hand.]

Halapē  (1) 1153I Halapē aku nei.He has been to Halapē.
 [He’s drunk. A play on pē (gone under) in Halapē, a place at the Puna-Kaʻū boundary.]

hālau  (14) 101ʻĀko Nuʻuanu i ka hālau loa a ka makani; ʻāko Mānoa i ka hale a ke ʻehu.Gathered in Nuuanu is the longhouse of the wind; gathered in Mānoa is the house of rainy sprays.
  129ʻAʻohe ʻauwaʻa paʻa i ka hālau i ka mālie.No canoes remain in the sheds in calm weather.
 [Everybody goes fishing in good weather. Also used when people turn out in great numbers to share in work or play.]
  196ʻAʻohe ʻoe no koʻu hālau.You are not of my shed.
 [Why do you presume to know who my ancestors are?]
  203ʻAʻohe pau ka ʻike i ka hālau hoʻokahi.All knowledge is not taught in the same school.
 [One can learn from many sources.]
  429Hālau ka hale; ʻohā ka ʻai.A big house; small taro to eat.
 [A large house brings so many visitors that to feed them all, even immature taro must be used.]
  430Hālau Lahaina, malu i ka ʻulu.Lahaina is like a large house shaded by breadfruit trees.

more hālau
560He hālau a hālau ko ka niu, hoʻokahi nō hālau o ka niuniu.The coconut tree has many shelters to go to; but the person who merely aspires has but one.
 [Said in scom to or of a person of low rank who assumes the air of a chief. A true chief (niu) is welcome every-where he goes; a pretender is only welcome in his own circle.]

Hālau-a-ola  (1) 2017Loaʻa ke ola i Hālau-a-ola.Life is obtained in the House-of-life.
 [One is happy, safe, well again. A play on ola (life, health, healing, contentment, and peace after a struggle).]

Hālawa  (1) 432Hālawa, inu wai kūkae.Hālawa drinker of excreta water.
 [An insult applied to the kauā of Hālawa, Molokaʻi.]

hālāwai  (2) 431Hālāwai ke kila me ka paea.Steel and flint meet.
 [When steel and flint come together, sparks result; so it is with two persons who cannot get along.]
  2059Mai ka hoʻokuʻi a ka hālāwai.From zenith to horizon.
 [An expression mueh used in prayers. In calling upon the gods in prayers, one mentions those from the east, west, north, south, and those from zenith to horizon.]

hale  (37) 2ʻAʻa i ka hula, waiho ka hilahila i ka hale.When one wants to dance the hula, bashfulness should be left at home.
 [Also expressed Aʻo i ka hula,....]
  9A hewa no he hale kanaka, ʻaʻohe hewa o ka hale kanaka ʻole.Fault can he found in an inhabited house and none in an uninhabited one.
 [Mistakes and weakness are always found in humanity.]
  90ʻAkahi a komo ke anu iaʻu, ua nahā ka hale e malu ai.Cold now penetrates me, for the house that shelters is broken.
 [Fear enters when protection is gone. Said by ʻAikanaka of Kauaʻi when two of his war leaders were destroyed by Kawelo.]
  100Ako ʻē ka hale a paʻa, a i ke komo ʻana mai o ka hoʻoilo, ʻaʻole e kulu i ka ua o Hilinehu.Thatch the house beforehand so when winter comes it will not leak in the shower of Hilinehu.
 [Do not procrastinate; make preparations for the future now.]
  101ʻĀko Nuʻuanu i ka hālau loa a ka makani; ʻāko Mānoa i ka hale a ke ʻehu.Gathered in Nuuanu is the longhouse of the wind; gathered in Mānoa is the house of rainy sprays.
  122Anu koʻū ka hale, ua hala ka makamaka.Cold and damp is the house, for the host is gone.
 [A house becomes sad and forlorn when it is no longer occupied by the host whose welcome was always warm.]

more hale
138ʻAʻohe hale i piha i ka hoihoi; hāʻawi mai a lawe aku nō.No house has a perpetual welcome; it is given and it is taken away.
 [A warning not to wear out one’s welcome.]

hale kipa  (2) 564He hale kipa nō lā hoʻi ko ke kōlea haʻihaʻi ʻē ʻia nā iwi.The house of a plover might have been that of a friend if one hadn’t broken his bones.
 [A stranger might have been a friend if he hadn’t been treated so shamefully.]
  2726Puka ka maka i waho, loaʻa ka hale kipa aku, kipa mai.A [new] face appears out [of the mother], someday to be a host as all visit back and forth.
 [Said of the baby of a relative or friend — it will someday host visiting relatives.]

hale noho  (1) 2709Pūanuanu ka hale noho ʻole ʻia e ke kanaka.Cold is an uninhabited house.
 [Said of an empty house, which lacks the warmth of love, or of the body after life is gone.]

hale wili  (1) 1702Keikei kūlana hale wili, ʻaʻohe mea hana o loko.A fine-looking mill, but no machinery inside.
 [Good-looking but unintelligent. Taken from a hula song.]

Haleakalā  (1) 96Akāka wale ʻo Haleakalā.Haleakalā stands in full view.
 [Said of anything that is very obvious or clearly understood.]

Haleʻauʻau  (1) 121A nui mai ke kai o Waialua, moe pupuʻu o Kalena i Haleʻauʻau.When the sea is rough at Waialua, Kalena curls up to sleep in Haleʻauʻau.
 [Applied to a person who prefers to sleep instead of doing chores. A play on lena (lazy), in Kalena, who was a fisherman, and hale (house) in Haleʻauʻau.]

Haleleʻa  (1) 1586Ka ua Makakoʻi o Haleleʻa.The Adz-edged rain of Haleleʻa.
 [A rain so cold that it feels like the sharp edge of an adz on the skin. Refers to Haleleʻa, Kauaʻi.]

hālelo  (1) 1888Kū ka hālelo, ke ʻā o kahawai.A lot of trash accumulated with the rocks in the streams.
 [The sign of a storm. Also said of the many useless, hurtful words uttered in anger.]

Halemano  (2) 433Halemano honi palai o uka.Halemano smells the ferns of the upland.
 [At Halemano, Oʻahu, the breezes bring the fragrance of ferns from the upland.]
  2379ʻOhuʻohu Halemano i ka lau lehua.Bedecked is Halemano with lehua leaves.
 [An expression of admiration for a good-looking person.]

Halepuaʻa  (1) 755Hele nō ka wai, hele nō ka ʻalā, wali ka ʻulu o Halepuaʻa.The water flows, the smooth stone [pounder] works, and the breadfruit of Halepuaʻa is well mixed [into poi].
 [Everything goes smoothly when one is prosperous. A play on wai (water) and ʻalā (smooth stone). ʻAlā commonly refers to cash. In later times, Hele nō ka wai, hele nō ka ʻalā came to refer to a generous donation. Halepuaʻa is a place in Puna, Hawaiʻi.]

hāleu  (1) 2615Pau ʻole nō ka ʻumeke i kekahi, pau ʻole nō ka lemu i ka hāleu.When one does not clean the sides of the poi bowl properly he is not likely to wipe his backside clean after excreting.

hali  (2) 1330Ka iʻa hali a ka makani.The fish fetched by the wind.
 [The ʻanaeholo, a fish that travels from Honouliuli, where it breeds, to Kaipāpaʻu on the windward side of Oʻahu. It then turns about and returns to its original home. It is driven closer to shore when the wind is strong.]
  1458Ka makani hali ʻala o Puna.The fragrance-bearing wind of Puna.
 [Puna, Hawaiʻi, was famed for the fragrance of maile, lehua, and hala. It was said that when the wind blew from the land, fishermen at sea could smell the fragrance of these leaves and flowers.]

hāliʻi  (2) 2063Mai ka lā ʻōʻili i Haʻehaʻe a hāliʻi i ka mole o Lehua.From the appearance of the sun at Haʻehaʻe till it spreads its light to the foundation of Lehua.
 [Haʻehaʻe is a place at Kumukahi, Puna, Hawaiʻi, often referred to in poetry as the gateway of the sun.]
  2594Pale hāliʻi moena.A mat cover.
 [A low commoner.]

halo  (1) 2261Nā mamo i ka halo o Kūa.The descendants of the gill fins of Kūa.
 [The people of Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi, are related to Kūa, the great shark god and protector of that district, by descent from his human sister.]

hālo  (1) 2072Mai kīʻai a hālo wale i ko haʻi ʻīpuka o pā auaneʻi i ka leo.Do not peer or peep in the doorway of other people’s houses or you’ll be struck by the voice.
 [Mind your own business, or you’ll hear something that will hurt your feelings.]

hālō  (4) 434Hālō aku ma ʻō, he maka helei; kiʻei mai ma ʻaneʻi, he ʻoʻopa.Peer over there and there is someone with a drawn-down eyelid; peep over here and here is a lame one.
 [No matter which way one turns there is a sign of bad luck.]
  793He mamo na Hālō me Kiʻei.A descendant of Peep and Peer.
 [Said of a snoopy person.]
  1174I ka ʻai, i ka nānā; i ka ʻai, i ka hālō; i ka ʻai, i ke kiʻei.Eat, look about; eat, peer; eat, peep.
 [Said of the eating of a thief — the eyes dart here and there to see if anyone is coming.]
  1479Ka manu kaʻupu hālō ʻale o ka moana.The kaʻupu, the bird that observes the ocean.
 [Said of a careful observer.]

Hāloa  (5) 308Eia ua lani a Hāloa i pili ai ka hanu i ke kapu.Here is a chief descended from Hāloa, whose kapu makes one hold his breath in dread.
 [A compliment to a chief. To be able to trace descent from Hāloa, an ancient chief, was to be of very high rank from remote antiquity.]
  1227ʻIliʻili o Hāloa.Pebbles of Hāloa.
 [Descendants of chiefs of Hāloa, grandson of Wākea and Papa, or any chiefs descended from the gods.]
  1700Ke hōʻole mai nei o Hāloa.Hāloa denies that.
 [Hāloa is the god of taro. It was said that whatever business was discussed before an open poi bowl was denied by Hāloa. If a medical kahuna was called while eating, he took it as a sign that he was not the right person to treat the sick one. However, if he was told while eating that someone was dying, he was able to treat the illness, for Hāloa would deny the death.]
  2052Mai hoʻomāuna i ka ʻai o huli mai auaneʻi o Hāloa e nānā.Do not be wasteful of food lest Hāloa turn around and stare [at you].
 [Do not be wasteful, especially of poi, because it would anger Hāloa, the taro god, who would someday let the waster go hungry.]
  2204Nā aliʻi o ke kuamoʻo o Hāloa.Chiefs of the lineage of Hāloa.
 [Said of high chiefs whose lineage goes back to ancient times — to Hāloa, son of Wākea. Wākea mated with Hoʻohokukalani and had two sons, both named Hāloa. The older Hāloa was born a taro, the younger one a man. It was this younger brother that the high chiefs name with pride as their ancestor.]

haluku  (1) 435Haluku ka ʻai a ke aku.The aku rush to eat.
 [Said of those who boisterously rush to eat.]

halulu  (1) 436Halulu me he kapuaʻi kanaka lā ka ua o Hilo.The rain of Hilo makes a rumbling sound like the treading of feet.

hamahamau  (1) 437Hamahamau ka leo o ka Waikoloa.Hush the voice of the Waikoloa wind.
 [Be silent if you don’t want to be rebuked. The Waikoloa is a cold wind.]

hamaki  (1) 2133"Māmaki" aku au, “hamaki” mai ʻoe. Pehea ka like?I say “māmaki” and you say “hamaki.” How are they alike?
 [Once a Hawaiian had some tapa made of māmaki bark which he wished to trade with some white sailors. He did not speak English and they did not speak Hawaiian. He said, “He kapa māmaki kēia.” (“This is kapa made of māmaki.”) Although they did not know exactly what he said, they understood that his goods were for sale. They asked, “How much?” He thought they were asking what kind of tapa he had, so he answered, “Māmaki.” Again the sailors asked, “How much?” which sounded like “hamaki” to the Hawaiian. In exasperation he cried, “I say ʻmāmaki’ and you say ʻhamaki.’How are they alike?” This utterance came to apply to two people who absolutely cannot agree.]

Hāmākua  (7) 438Hāmākua ʻāina pali loa.Hāmākua, land of tall cliffs.
 [Praise of Hāmākua, Hawaiʻi.]
  439Hāmākua i ka wakawaka.Irregular and rough Hāmākua.
 [Praise of Hāmākua, a district of gulches and valleys.]
  440Hāmākua i ke ala ʻūlili.Hāmākua of the steep trails.
 [Praise of Hāmākua, a land of precipices and gulches where the old trails were often steep and difficult to travel on.]
  441Hāmākua kihi loa.Hāmākua with a long corner.
 [One corner of Hāmākua touches every district of Hawaiʻi except Puna. Also, a play on kihi loa. A native of Hāmākua is said to avoid meeting strangers. Because of bashfulness or disinclination to share his possessions, he will turn aside (kihi) and go a long way away (loa).]
  728Hele a ʻīlio pīʻalu ka uka o Hāmākua i ka lā.Like a wrinkled dog is the upland of Hāmākua in the sunlight.
 [An uncomplimentary remark about an aged, wrinkled person. Line from a chant.]
  1568Ka ua kīhene lehua o Hāmākua.The rain that produces the lehua clusters of Hāmākua.
  1597Ka ua pehi hala o Hāmākua.The rain of Hāmākua that pelts the pandanus fruit clusters.
 [Refers to Hāmākua, Maui.]

hāmama  (3) 442Hāmama ka waha he pō iʻa ʻole.When the mouth yawns, it is a night on which no fish are caught.
 [A sleepy, yawning person isn’t likely to be out catching fish.]
  443Hāmama nā paniwai o Kulanihākoʻi.The lids of Kulanihākoʻi are removed.
  518He ʻai leo ʻole, he ʻīpuka hāmama.Food unaccompanied by a voice; a door always open.
 [Said about the home of a hospitable person. The food can be eaten without hearing a complaint from the owners, and the door is never closed to any visitor.]

hāmani  (1) 485Hapawalu liʻiliʻi, hāmani wale nō.A small eighth of a dollar, very smooth to handle.
 [An eighth of a dollar is not a high price so one should not mind spending it.]

hamau  (1) 274E hamau o makani mai auaneʻi.Hush, lest the wind arise.
 [Hold your silence or trouble will come to us. When the people went to gather pearl oysters at Puʻuloa, they did so in silence, for they believed that if they spoke, a gust of wind would ripple the water and the oysters would vanish.]

hāmau  (4) 123Anu ʻo ʻEwa i ka iʻa hāmau leo e. E hāmau!ʻEwa is made cold by the fish that silences the voice. Hush!
 [A warning to keep still. First uttered by Hiʻiaka to her friend Wahineʻomaʻo to warn her not to speak to Lohiʻau while they were in a canoe near ʻEwa.]
  1331Ka iʻa hāmau leo o ʻEwa.The fish of ʻEwa that silences the voice.
 [The pearl oyster, which has to be gathered in silence.]
  2646Pili ka hanu; hāmau ka leo.Suppress the breath; silence the voice.
 [Be as quiet as possible; utter no sound.]

hamo  (1) 565He hamo hulu puna ma waho.A brushing on the outside with whitewash.
 [A friendly exterior only.]

Hamohamo  (3) 444Hamohamo i ke kualā o Puna.Pats the dorsal fin of Puna.
 [Said of one who is verbally ambitious but does nothing to attain his goal, or of one who is full of flattery and false promises.]
  829He moʻopuna na Pālau o Hamohamo.A grandchild of Pālau, resident of Hamohamo.
 [A braggart. A play on Pālau (Idle talk) and Hamohamo (Flatter).]
  1044Hoʻi ʻolohelohe i ke kula o Hamohamo.Going home destitute on the plain of Hamohamo.
 [Going home empty-handed. A play on hamo (rub), as in the act of rubbing the hands together to indicate that one is empty-handed. Hamohamo is a place in Waikīkī.]

hana  (55) 57Aia ke ola i ka hana.Life is in labor.
 [Labor produces what is needed.]
  103Akua nō hoʻi nā hana!Such extraordinary behavior!
 [Said of a person who is mean and willful, with no thought for anyone but himself. He is compared to the heroic figures of old (akua) who were born deformed and abandoned as infants, then rescued and raised to adulthood. Such persons were often belligerent by nature.]
  139ʻAʻohe hana a Kauhikoa; ua kau ka waʻa i ke ʻaki.Kauhikoa has nothing more to do; his canoe is resting on the block.
 [His work is all done.]
  140ʻAʻohe hana a Kauhikoa, ua kau ke poʻo i ka uluna.Kauhikoa has nothing more to do but rest his head on the pillow.
 [Everything is done and one can take his ease. Kauhikoa, a native of Kohala, was a clever person who could quickly accomplish what others would take months to do.]
  141ʻAʻohe hana i nele i ka uku.No deed lacks a reward.
 [Every deed, good or bad, receives its just reward.]
  174ʻAʻohe loa i ka hana a ke aloha.Distance is ignored by love.

more hana
262E aʻo i ka hana o pā i ka leo o ka makua hūnōai.Learn to work lest you be struck by the voice of the parent-in-law.
 [Advice to a son or daughter before marriage.]

Hāna  (8) 451Hāna i ka iʻa iki.Hāna of the little fish.
 [Believing slanderous tales about Kuʻula and his wife, Hinahele, the ruling chief of Hāna ordered them destroyed. Having mana over the fish of the sea, the two caused a scarcity until their son ʻAiʻai brought them back to life. Kuʻula and Hinahele were worshipped as deities by fishermen.]
  460Hāna, mai Koʻolau a Kaupō.Hāna, from Koʻolau to Kaupō.
 [The extent of the district of Hāna, Maui.]
  1154I hāna ka pō, i hāna ke ao.Alert by night, alert by day.
 [Said of a fisherman or farmer who begins work before sunrise and continues into the daylight hours.]
  1566Ka ua kea o Hāna.The white rain of Hāna.
 [Refers to the misty rain of Hāna, Maui, that comes in from the sea.]
  1578Ka ua Lanihaʻahaʻa o Hāna.The Rain-of-the-low-sky of Hāna
 [Refers to Hāna, Maui. once, the young warrior chief Kaʻeokulani ran to a banana grove to escape a sudden squall. As he stood safe and dry in the shelter of the banana leaves he lifted his spear. It accidentally pierced through the leaves and a trickle of water came through. He remarked that the sky where he stood was so low he had pierced it.]
  2124Mālia Hāna ke ahuwale nei Kaihuokala.Hāna is calm, for Kaihuokala is clearly seen.
 [Kaihuokala is a hill on the Hāna side of Haleakalā. When no cloud rests upon it, it is a sign of clear weather. Also expressed Mālie Maui, ke waiho maila Kaihuokala.]

more Hāna
2359ʻO Hāna ia, he ʻāina au pehu.That is Hāna, land where lack was known.

hana hewa  (1) 2100Makaʻu ka hana hewa i ka uka o Puna.Wrongdoing is feared in the upland of Puna.
 [Wrongdoing in the upland of Puna brings the wrath of Pele.]

hana nui  (1) 142ʻAʻohe hana nui ke alu ʻia.No task is too big when done together by all.

hana wale  (1) 2045Mai hana wale aku, he niho.Do not annoy [him, for] he has teeth.
 [Do not tamper with him, for he knows the art of sorcery.]

hānai  (16) 163ʻAʻohe kāne hānai nalo.No husband feeds his wife flies.
 [All husbands have some good qualities.]
  275E hānai ʻawa a ikaika ka makani.Feed with ʻawa that the spirit may gain strength.
 [One offers ʻawa and prayers to the dead so that their spirits may grow strong and be a source of help to the family.]
  277E hea i ke kanaka e komo ma loko e hānai ai a hewa ka waha.Call to the person to enter; feed him until he can take no more.
 [Originally a reply to a password into a hula school. Used later in songs and in speech to extend hospitality.]
  449Hānai ʻia i ka ʻiao.Fed with ʻiao fish.
 [One is given small gifts to interest him until, like the deep-sea fish, he takes the hook and is landed. The ʻiao is a small fish used as a bait for large, deep-sea fish.]
  450Hānai ʻia i ka poli o ka lima.Fed in the palm of the hand.
 [Said of a child reared with constant attention.]
  452Hānai holoholona, ʻaʻohe lohe i ka ʻohumu.Feed animals and no complaints are heard.
 [A retort by one who is criticized for raising animals instead of children.]

more hānai
453Hānai kanaka, hiki ke hoʻoūnauna.Feed humans and one can send them on errands.
 [Said to people who adopt or take in children to raise. Children can be helpful.]

Hanakahi  (6) 463Hananeʻe ke kīkala o ko Hilo kini; hoʻi luʻuluʻu i ke one o Hanakahi.The hips of Hilo’s multitude were sagging as they returned, laden, to Hanakahi.
 [Used to express the weight of grief, or to mean that a person has a heavy load to carry. Lines from a chant entitled, “Hoe Puna i ka Waʻa.”]
  999Hilo Hanakahi.Hilo, land of Hanakahi.
 [Hanakahi was the name of a chief of Hilo in ancient times.]
  1969Lei Hanakahi i ke ʻala me ke onaona o Panaʻewa.Hanakahi is adorned with the fragrance and perfume of Panaʻewa.
 [The forest of Panaʻewa was famous for its maile vines and hala and lehua blossoms, well liked for making lei, so Hilo (Hanakahi) was said to be wreathed with fragrance.]
  1999Like nō i ka laʻi o Hanakahi.All the same in the calm of Hanakahi.
 [There is unity; all are as one. A play on kahi (one) in the place name Hanakahi.]
  2033Luʻuluʻu Hanakahi i ka ua nui.Weighted down is Hanakahi hy the heavy rain.
 [Hanakahi, Hilo, was named for a chief of ancient times. This expression was much used in dirges to express heaviness of the heart, as tears pour like rain.]
  2154Me he makamaka lā ka ua no Kona, ke hele lā a kipa i Hanakahi.The rain is like a friend from Kona — it goes and calls on Hanakahi.
 [These are two lines from an old chant used to express a friendly visit with one who dwells in a distant place.]

Hanakāpīʻai  (3) 1399Ka iki koaiʻe a Hanakāpīʻai.The small koaiʻe tree of Hanakāpīʻai.
 [A boast of that locality on Kauaʻi. One may be small in stature but he is as tough and sturdy as the koaiʻe tree.]
  1517Ka ʻoʻopu peke o Hanakāpīʻai.The short ʻoʻopu of Hanakāpīʻai.
 [The ʻoʻopu at Hanakāpīʻai on Kauaʻi were said to be shorter and plumper than those anywhere else. Mentioned in chants.]
  2529ʻOʻopu peke o Hanakāpīʻai.The stunted ʻoʻopu fish of Hanakāpīʻai.
 [Famed in the legends of Kauaʻi are the ʻoʻopu of Hanakāpīʻai, which are said to be plump and shorter in length than those elsewhere. Sometimes applied humorously to a short, plump person.]

Hanalē  (2) 162ʻAʻohe kana mai o ka holo o ka lio ia Hanalē; pākahi a ka lio, pālua a ka lio.How Henry made the horses run; one on a horse or two on a horse.
 [How hunger (Henry) made the fingers work in conveying poi to the mouth — with one fmger and with two.]
  992Hiki maila nā hoaloha, ʻo Keʻolohaka lāua ʻo Hanalē.The friends Keʻolohaka and Hanalē have come.
 [The friends Vacancy and Hunger are here. Said in fun when one is very hungry.]

Hanalei  (3) 1584Ka ua loku o Hanalei.The pouring rain of Hanalei.
  2034Luʻuluʻu Hanalei i ka ua nui; kaumaha i ka noe o Alakaʻi.Heavily weighted is Hanalei in the pouring rain; laden down by the mist of Alakaʻi.
 [An expression used in dirges and chants of woe to express the burden of sadness, the heaviness of grief, and tears pouring freely like rain. Rains and fogs of other localities may also be used.]
  2151Meʻe uʻi o Hanalei.The handsome hero of Hanalei.
 [Said of one who is attractive.]

Hanamāʻulu  (1) 2320No Hanamāʻulu ka ipu puehu.The quickly emptied container belongs to Hanamāʻulu.
 [Said of the stingy people of Hanamāʻulu, Kauaʻi — no hospitality there. At one time, food containers would be hidden away and the people of Hanamāʻulu would apologize for having so little to offer their guests.]

hananeʻe  (1) 463Hananeʻe ke kīkala o ko Hilo kini; hoʻi luʻuluʻu i ke one o Hanakahi.The hips of Hilo’s multitude were sagging as they returned, laden, to Hanakahi.
 [Used to express the weight of grief, or to mean that a person has a heavy load to carry. Lines from a chant entitled, “Hoe Puna i ka Waʻa.”]

hanau   see     [note]

hānau  (26) 56Aia kēkē nā hulu o ka umauma hoʻi ke kōlea i Kahiki e hānau ai.When the feathers on the breast darken [because of fatness] the plover goes back to Kahiki to breed.
 [A person comes here, grows prosperous, and goes away without a thought to the source of his prosperity.]
  230ʻAʻole nō i ʻike ke kanaka i nā nani o kona wahi i hānau ʻia ai.A person doesn’t see all the beauties of his birthplace.
 [One doesn’t see how beautiful his birthplace is until he goes away from home.]
  387Ēwe hānau o ka ʻāina.Natives of the land.
 [People who were born and dwelt on the land.]
  464Hānau ʻia i ka pō Lāʻau, lāʻau nā iwi, he koa.Born was he on a Lāʻau night for his bones are hard and he is fearless.
 [Said of a bold, fearless person. Lāʻau nights are a group of nights in the lunar month. The days following each of these nights are believed to be good for planting trees.]
  465Hānau ʻia i Kaulua, he koa wiwo ʻole.Born in Kaulua, a warrior brave is he.
 [Said of one born in the month of Kaulua.]
  467Hānau ke aliʻi i loko o Holoholokū, he aliʻi nui; hānau ke kanaka i loko o Holoholokū, he aliʻi nō; hānau ke aliʻi ma waho aʻe o Holoholokū, ʻaʻohe aliʻi, he kanaka ia.The child of a chief born in Holoholokū is a high chief; the child of a commoner born in Holoholokū is a chief; the child of a chief born outside of the borders of Holoholokū is a commoner.
 [Holoholokū, sacred birthplace of the chiefs, is in Wailua, Kauaʻi.]

more hānau
466Hānau ka ʻāina, hānau ke aliʻi, hānau ke kanaka.Born was the land, born were the chiefs, born were the common people.
 [The land, the chiefs, and the commoners belong together.]

hānau mua  (1) 1250I paʻa i ka hānau mua, ʻaʻole e puka nā pōkiʻi.Had the mother died in bearing the oldest, all the others would not have been born.
 [Said in reminding brothers and sisters to respect the hiapo (eldest).]

Haneoʻo  (1) 468Haneoʻo amo one.Sand-carrying Haneoʻo.
 [An epithet applied to the kauwā of Haneoʻo, Hāna, Maui.]

hanini  (2) 469Hanini ka wai o Kulanihākoʻi.The water of Kulanihākoʻi spills.
 [It’s raining.]
  2637Piʻi ka ʻula a hanini i kumu pepeiao.The red rises till it spills over the base of the ears.
 [Said of one who blushes violently or of one who is flushed with anger.]

hano hāweo  (1) 2803Ua kau i ka hano hāweo.Reached the peak of honors.
 [Said of one who has attained a high position. Used in hula chants and songs.]

hanohano  (2) 470Hanohano nā pali kiʻekiʻe o Wailau.Majestic are the tall cliffs of Wailau.
 [An expression of admiration for a stately and regal person. Refers to Wailau, Molokaʻi.]
  471Hanohano Paliuli i ka ua noe.Majestic is Paliuli in the misty rain.
 [An expression of admiration for a person. Paliuli is a mythical place in the mountain region back of the Panaʻewa forest, Hawaiʻi.]

hānono  (1) 2602Papani ka uka o Kapela; puaʻi hānono wai ʻole o Kukaniloko; pakī hunahuna ʻole o Holoholokū; ʻaʻohe mea nāna e ʻaʻe paepae kapu o Līloa.Close the upland of Kapela; no red water gushes from Kukaniloko; not a particle issues from Holoholokū; there is none to step over the sacred platform of Līloa.
 [The old chiefs and their sacredness are gone; the descendants are no longer laid to rest at Ka-pela-kapu-o-Kakaʻe at ʻīao; the descendants no longer point to Kukaniloko on Oʻahu and Holoholokū on Kauaʻi as the sacred birthplaces; there is no one to tread on the sacred places in Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, where Līloa once dwelt.]

hanopilo  (1) 472Hanopilo ka leo o ka ʻalae.Hoarse is the voice of the muelhen.
 [Said of a person who talks himself hoarse.]

hanu  (12) 308Eia ua lani a Hāloa i pili ai ka hanu i ke kapu.Here is a chief descended from Hāloa, whose kapu makes one hold his breath in dread.
 [A compliment to a chief. To be able to trace descent from Hāloa, an ancient chief, was to be of very high rank from remote antiquity.]
  353E moni i ke koko o ka inaina, ʻumi ka hanu o ka hoʻomanawanui.Swallow the blood of wrath and hold the breath of patience.
  381ʻEu kōlea i kona puapua; ʻeu ke kanaka i kona hanu.A plover stirs its tail; a man stirs because of the breath within.
 [Said by Kaʻiana, who led an army in battle under Kamehameha I. When the Puna fighters refused to battle against Keouakuahuʻula because of the close kinship between their own district and Kaʻū, Kaʻiana said this to urge them to think of themselves and their own lives. Encouraged, the warriors resumed fīghting and won the victory for Kamehameha.]
  1332Ka iʻa hanu ʻala o kahakai.The fragrant-breathed fish of the beach.
 [The līpoa, a seaweed with an odor easily detected from a distance.]
  1383Ka iʻa ʻumi i ka hanu.The fish that holds the breath.
 [The wana, or sea urchin. The fisherman holds his breath as he dives for them.]
  1958Lawe ka hanu i ʻOlepau.The breath was taken to ʻOlepau.
 [A play on ʻole (no) and pau (finished) Said of one who dies by accident, in a war, etc., and not from natural causes. ʻOlepau is a moon phase in the lunar month.]

more hanu
2347Nui ka hanu o Limahuli i nā lehua o Luluʻupali.Heavily-sighed Limahuli falls over the lehua blossoms of Luluupali.
 [Said of a person in love who sighs over a sweetheart.]

hānupanupa  (1) 2200Nā ʻale hānupanupa o Pailolo.The choppy billows of Pailolo.
 [Pailolo is the channel between Oʻahu and Molokaʻi.]

hanuʻu  (1) 473Hanuʻu ke kai i Mokuola.The sea recedes at Mokuola.
 [Now is the opportune time to venture forth. Mokuola, now known as Coconut Island, is a small island in Hilo Bay believed to have curative influences. The sick who swam around it recovered, and a person who could swim around it three times under water would have a long life. When the sea receded, one could swim part way around with little effort.]

hao  (12) 475Hao ka Inuwai, maloʻo ka lau lāʻau.The Inuwai breeze blew, withering the leaves of the trees.
 [Along he came and nothing was left. The Inuwai (Drink-water) breeze is very drying.]
  476Hao kōʻala ka makani lā, pau loa.With one great sweep of wind, all is gone.
  478Hao mai ka makani kuakea ka moana; hao mai ke kai kū ke koʻa i uka.When the gales blow, the sea is white-backed; when the sea rises, corals are washed ashore.
 [Said of the rise of temper.]
  479Hao nā kēpā o Līhuʻe i ke anu.The spurs of Līhue dig in with cold.
 [Lihuʻe, Oʻahu, often gets very cold.]
  837He nani hulali ka hao.A beauty like the shine of steel.
 [Not applied to persons. From the chorus of a song of the 1800s.]
  1179I Kahiki nō ka hao, ʻo ke kiʻo ʻana i Hawaiʻi nei.In Kahiki was the iron; in Hawaiʻi, the rusting.
 [Perhaps the foreigner was a good person while he was at home, but here he grows careless with his behavior.]

more hao
1298Ka hao a ka makani Kona, ʻaʻohe manu koe o ke kuahiwi.When the Kona wind does its worst, no birds remain in the mountains.
 [When someone goes into a towering rage, everyone flees his presence.]

haʻo  (1) 2147Mauna Kea, kuahiwi kū haʻo i ka mālie.Mauna Kea, standing alone in the calm.

Haoaloa  (1) 1929Kūpinaʻi i ke alo o Haoaloa.Keeps repeating in the presence of Haoaloa.
 [The din of shouting is heard again and again. Also, the noise keeps flowing like rushing water.]

haoʻe  (1) 474Haoʻe nā ʻale o Hōpoe i ka ʻino.The billows of Hōpoe rise in the storm.
 [His anger is mounting. Hōpoe, Puna, has notoriously high seas.]

haohia  (1) 161ʻAʻohe kanaka o kauhale, aia i Mānā, ua haohia i ka iʻa iki.No one is at home, for all have gone to Mānā, attracted there by small fishes.
 [Said of one who is distracted by an insignificant matter or goes away on any excuse.]

haole  (5) 455Hana ʻiʻo ka haole!The white man does it in earnest!
 [Hawaiians were generally easygoing and didn’t order people off their lands or regard them as trespassers. When the whites began to own lands, people began to be arrested for trespassing and the lands were fenced in to keep the Hawaiians out.]
  477Haole kī kōlea!Plover-shooting haole!
 [Blundering Caucasian. Said in exasperation of a white person. The haole, in going plover hunting, shoots with his gun, killing some, maiming others. The maimed can fly elsewhere to die or become victims of some other animal. But the Hawaiian goes quietly at night with a net. He takes what he wants and lets the others escape unharmed.]
  480Hapa haole ʻiʻo ʻoniʻoni.Half-white with quivering flesh.
 [What restless, active people these part-Caucasians are!]
  1326Ka iʻa ʻawaʻawa a ka haole.The foreigners’ sour fish.
 [Salted salmon, a fish commonly eaten by Hawaiians after its introduction here.]
  1960Lawe liʻiliʻi ka make a ka Hawaiʻi, lawe nui ka make a ka haole.Death by Hawaiians takes a few at a time; death by foreigners takes many.
 [The diseases that were known in the islands before the advent of foreigners caused fewer deaths than those that were introduced.]

hapa  (1) 480Hapa haole ʻiʻo ʻoniʻoni.Half-white with quivering flesh.
 [What restless, active people these part-Caucasians are!]

hāpai  (3) 481Hāpai ke kuko, hānau ka hewa.When covetousness is conceived, sin is born.
  482Hāpai kiʻekiʻe i ke aka o ʻAina-kō, kewekewe i ke alia o Malaekoa.Lified high is the shadow of ʻAina-kō, making crooked patterns on the salt-encrusted land of Malaekoa.
 [It is applied to a conceited, proud, and self-centered person.]
  1786Kiʻekiʻe ka lele a ke ao i ka lani, i hāpai ʻia e ka makani i luna.High flies the cloud in the sky, lifted by the wind.
 [Said of one whose position is elevated by a chief.]

hāpala  (2) 483Hāpala ʻia aʻela i ka hāwena.Daubed with lime.
 [His hair may be gray, as one whose hair is bleached with lime, but he has no more wisdom than an inexperienced youth.]
  1459Ka makani hāpala lepo o Pāʻia.Dust-smearing wind of Paia.
 [Pāʻia, Maui, is a dusty place.]

hapapa  (1) 2297Nā ʻulu hua i ka hapapa.The breadfruit that bears on the ground.
 [Breadfruit trees of Niʻihau were grown in sinkholes. The trunks were not visible, and the branches seemed to spread along the ground. These trees are famed in chants of Niʻihau.]

hāpapa  (4) 238ʻAukuʻu hāpapa i ka haʻi loko.Heron groping in somebody else’s fishpond.
 [A man groping for somebody else’s woman.]
  484Hāpapa hewa ka malihini makamaka ʻole.A stranger without a friend feels lost.
 [This was first uttered in a chant by Hiʻiaka, who, upon arriving at Kauaʻi to seek Lohiʻau, found no friendliness from his sister Kahuanui and her people.]
  1866Kuhikuhi kahi lima i luna, hāpapa kahi lima i lalo.One hand points upward, the other gropes downward.
 [Said of a religious leader who teaches others to seek heavenly wealth while he himself seeks worldly possessions.]
  2423ʻO ka makapō wale nō ka mea hāpapa i ka pōuli.ʻOnly the blind grope in darkness.
 [Said to one who gropes around instead of going directly to the object he is seeking.]

hapawalu  (1) 485Hapawalu liʻiliʻi, hāmani wale nō.A small eighth of a dollar, very smooth to handle.
 [An eighth of a dollar is not a high price so one should not mind spending it.]

hāpuku  (3) 2363ʻOhi hāpuku ka iʻa o Kapaʻau.Any kind of fish was gathered at Kapaʻau.
 [At time of famine no one was particular about the kind of fish he received.]
  2364ʻOhi hāpuku ka makapehu o Kaunu.The hungry of Kaunu greedily gather.
 [Said of one who greedily takes anything, good or inferior. Also said of one who talks carelessly without regard for the feelings of others.]
  2365ʻOhi hāpuku ka wahie o Kapaʻau.Anything was gathered up as fuel at Kapaʻau.
 [Said of one who takes anything and everything. At one time Kohala suffered a drought and food became scarce. The women did their best to raise food at ʻAinakea while the men traveled far in search of some means of relieving the famine. In order to cook their meager, inferior crops, the women used whatever they found for fuel — dried sugar-cane leaves, grasses, potatoes, and so forth.]

hāpuʻu  (1) 568He hāpuʻu ka ʻai he ʻai make.If the hāpuʻu is the food, it is the food of death.
 [When famine came many depended on hāpuʻu to sustain life, but it required much work to prepare. There was the cutting, the preparation of the imu, and three whole days during which the hāpuʻu cooked. If the food was done then, hunger was stayed; if not, there was another long delay, and by that time someone may have starved to death.]

hau  (6) 1301Ka hau hoʻokuakea ʻili.The snow that bleaches the skin.
 [Living in a land where it snows was believed to lighten the skin.]
  1744Kekeʻe hau o Maʻalo.Crooked are the hau trees of Maʻalo.
 [A humorous saying. The hau grove of Maʻalo, Maui, was known as a place for illicit love affairs.]
  1754Ke kololio ka hau o uka, kō mai ka nae ʻaʻala o ke kiele.When the dew-laden breeze of the upland creeps swiftly down it brings with it the fragrance of the gardenias.
 [Said of one who comes with happy tidings.]
  2118Mālama o ʻike i ke kaula ʻili hau o Kailua.Take care lest you feel the hau-bark rope of Kailua.
 [Take care lest you get hurt. When braided into a rounded rope, hau bark is strong, and when used as a switch it can be painful.]
  2170Moe kokolo ka uahi o Kula, he Hau.The smoke of Kula traveled low and swift, borne by the Hau wind.
 [Said of one who is swift in movement. Also, in love and war much depends on swiftness and subtlety.]
  2687Poliʻahu, ka wahine kapa hau anu o Mauna Kea.Poliʻahu, the woman who wears the snow mantle of Mauna Kea.
 [Poliʻahu is the goddess of snows; her home is on Mauna Kea.]

Hau  (2) 497Hau wawā ka nahele.A din in the forest.
 [Rumors and gossip abroad.]
  1303Ka Hau o Maʻihi.The Hau [breeze] of Maʻihi.
 [Refers to Maʻihi, Kona, Hawaiʻi. Because this locality was named for Maʻihi-ala-kapu-o-Lono, daughter of the god Lono-a-ipu, this wind was regarded as sacred and did not blow beyond Kainaliu and Keauhou.]

haʻu  (4) 487Haʻu ka makani, haʻule ke onaona, pili i ka mauʻu.When the wind puffs, the fragrant blossoms fall upon the grass.
 [When there is an explosion of wrath, people quail before it.]
  488Haʻu ka waha i ka makani.The mouth puffs at the wind.
 [Loud talk. Like the braying of an ass.]
  2471ʻO Kona i ka paka ʻona — ke haʻu iho ʻoe kūnewanewa.Kona of the potent tohacco — a draw would make one stagger.
 [Kona is said to be a land of potent lovemaking.]
  2643Pī ka ihu, haʻu i ka makani.The nose snorts as he puffs at the wind.
 [He is incoherent with anger.]

Hauaʻiliki  (2) 1998Lī ka ʻili i ke anu o Hauaʻiliki.The skin is chilled in the cold of Hauaʻiliki.
 [It is extremely cold. A play on the name Hau-a-iliki (Ice-strikes).]
  2714Pue i ke anu o Hauaʻiliki.Crouch in the cold of Hauaʻiliki.
 [Said of an intense cold. A play on hau (ice) and ʻiliki (strike) in the place name Hauaʻiliki.]

hauhili  (1) 486Hauhili ka ʻai a ke kaweleʻā.The kaweleʻā fish takes the hook in such a way as to tangle the lines.
 [Said of a tangled situation.]

Hauiki  (1) 228ʻAʻole i keʻehi kapuaʻi i ke one o Hauiki.Has not set foot on the sands of Hauiki.
 [One does not know much about a place until one has been there.]

haʻukeke  (1) 853He ʻohu kolo ka makani, haʻukeke kamahele.The wind that brings the creeping fog causes the traveler to shiver.
 [Anger and squabbles in the home of a host chill the spirit of the guest.]

hāʻukeʻuke  (2) 2587Pala ka hala, momona ka hāʻukeʻuke.When the pandanus fruit ripens, the hāʻukeʻuke sea urchin is fat.
  2855Ua wela ka lā, ke ʻoni nei kukuna o ka hāʻukeʻuke.The sun is too warm, for the spikes of the hāʻukeʻuke are moving.
 [Anger is growing, and those near the angry one are moving out of the way. The hauke’uke is a sea urchin.]

haulani  (1) 1684Ke awa haulani o Māhukona.The restless harbor of Māhukona.
 [Poets refer also to the surging (hanupanupā) waves of Māhukona.]

haʻule  (2) 487Haʻu ka makani, haʻule ke onaona, pili i ka mauʻu.When the wind puffs, the fragrant blossoms fall upon the grass.
 [When there is an explosion of wrath, people quail before it.]
  2404ʻO ka haʻule nehe o ka lau lāʻau, he hāwanawana ia i ka poʻe ola.The rustling of falling leaves is like a whisper to the living.
 [It is the living who appreciate such things.]

hāʻule  (8) 316E kanu i ka huli ʻoi hāʻule ka ua.Plant the taro stalks while there is rain.
 [Do your work when opportunity affords.]
  345E mālama i ka leo o ke aliʻi, o hāʻule wale i ka weuweu.Take care of the chief’s voice, lest it drop among the grass.
 [Heed the chief’s voice; do not ignore his commands.]
  489Hāʻule i ka hope waʻa.Left in the aft of the canoe.
 [Said of one who comes last or is tardy.]
  491Hāʻule nō i kāna ʻauwaha i ʻeli ai.Fell into the ditch that he himself dug.
 [Caught in his own trap.]
  959He ʻulu ʻaʻai ʻole; he hāʻule wale i ka makani.It is a breadfruit that does not hold to the tree; it falls easily with the wind.
 [Said of a person whose loyalty is doubtful — he can be swayed to desert his chief.]
  1438Ka lei hāʻule ʻole, he keiki.A lei that is never cast aside is one’s child.

more hāʻule
2158Minamina ka leo o ke aliʻi i ka hāʻule i ka pūweuweu.A pity to allow the words of the chief to fall among the clumps of grass.
 [A reminder to heed the commands and wishes of one’s chief.]

Hāʻulelau  (1) 490Hāʻulelau i Kalalau, ʻo Lūaliʻi lā i Kauliʻiliʻi.Hāʻulelau is at Kalalau, and Lūalii is at Kauliʻiliʻi.
 [Such a scattering all over the place, like fallen leaves, with bits and pieces all strewn about. A play on haule-lau (fallen leaves), kalalau (wander around), lū-aliʻi (scatter in pieces), and kau-liʻiliʻi (a little here and a little there).]

hāuli  (2) 1302Ka hāuli o ka mea hewa ʻole, he nalowale koke.A bruise inflicted on an innocent person vanishes quickly.
 [Mean words uttered against the innocent may hurt, but the hurt will not last.]
  2217Nā hoa ʻaka o ke one hāuli o ka malama.Laughing friends — when the sands look dark in the moonlight.
 [Said of friends who will laugh and play in the moonlight but who will not lend a hand when daylight and labor come.]

hāuliuli  (3) 1992Liʻiliʻi hāuliuli, monimoni ka hāʻae.Little hāuliuli fish, makes the mouth water.
 [Said in reference to a young person who is already wise in the ways of sex and has a strong attraction for the opposite sex.]
  2285Nā pali hāuliuli o ke Koʻolau.The dark hills of Koʻolau.
 [The hills and cliffs of the windward side of O’ahu are always dark and beautiful with trees and shrubs.]
  2455ʻO ke ao aku nō hoʻi koe, ʻaina ʻē ka hāuliuli.It was almost day when the hāuliuli fish began to take the bait.
 [One was just about giving up hope when the person he was angling for showed some response.]

haumanumanu  (1) 492Haumanumanu ka ipu ʻinoʻino.A misshapen gourd makes an ugly container.
 [Said of an ugly person. Also said in warning to a mother to be careful with the body of her baby — to mold it lest it be imperfect and ugly.]

hauna  (2) 494Hauna ke kai o ka moa liʻiliʻi.Unsavory is the soup made of little chickens.
 [Said of or to a boy or girl who desires to make love when too young to know anything about it.]
  495Hauna ke kai o ka palani.The palani makes a strong-smelling soup.
 [A person of unsavory reputation imparts it to all he does.]

hāuna  (1) 1401Kaikoʻeke a ka hāuna ʻino.Brothers-in-law who smite severely.
 [Hikapoloa, a Kohala chief, treated his brothers-in-law with severe cruelty and later was destroyed by them.]

haunaele  (1) 493Haunaele ʻEwa i ka Moaʻe.ʻEwa is disturbed by the Moaʻe wind.
 [Used about something disturbing, like a violent argument. When the people of ʻEwa went to gather the pipi (pearl oyster), they did so in silence, for if they spoke, a Moaʻe breeze would suddenly blow across the water, rippling it, and the oysters would disappear.]

hāunu  (1) 2175Moena hāunu ʻole o ka nahele.Mat of the forest to which no strips are added in making.
 [Said of a bed made of fern, banana, or other leaves of the forest — one needs no strips of lauhala or other material to make a mat.]

Hauola  (3) 1425Ka laʻi o Hauola.The calm of Hauola.
 [Peace and comfort. There is a stone in the sea at Lahama, Maui, called Pōhaku-o-Hauola, where pregnant women went to sit to ensure an easy birth. The umbilical cords of babies were hidden in crevices in the stone.]
  1939Laʻi Hauola i ke kai māʻokiʻoki.Peaceful Hauola by the choppy sea.
 [Peace and tranquility in the face of disturbance.]
  2012Liʻuliʻu wale ka nohona i ka lā o Hauola, a holoholo i ke one o ʻAlio.Long has one tarried in the sunlight of Hauola and walked on the sand of ʻAlio.
 [Said in praise of an aged person. There is a play on ola (life) in the name Hauola.]

hauʻoli  (1) 569He hauʻoli ka ukali o ka lanakila.Gladness follows in the wake of victory.

haupeʻepeʻe  (1) 133ʻAʻohe e nalo, he haupeʻepeʻe na kamaliʻi.Not well hidden, for it is the hiding of little children.

Hāʻupu  (6) 496Hāʻupu mauna kilohana i ka laʻi.Hāʻupu, a mountain outstanding in the calm.
 [Said of a person of outstanding achievement. Also used in praise of Hāʻupu, Kauaʻi.]
  1395Kaʻi ka puaʻa i luna o Hāʻupu, e ua ana.When the pigs move around the summit of Hāʻupu, it is going to rain.
 [When puffy “pig” clouds encircle the top of Hāʻupu, above Kīpū on Kauaʻi, it is a sign of rain.]
  1513Kaʻohu wānana ua o Hāʻupu.The mist of Hāʻupu that foretells rain.
 [When clouds circle the peak of Hāʻupu, Kauaʻi, it is sure to rain.]
  2525ʻO ʻoe hoʻi kahi i Haʻupu kēlā, ua kupu a kiʻekiʻe i luna.You, too, were on the tall hill of Haʻupu going all the way up to the very top.
 [Said sarcastically to a person who boasts of his greatness.]
  2780Ua hala ka wawā i Hāʻupu.The loud talking has gone to Haupu.
 [The gossip is now widespread.]
  2823Ua loha nā hui o Hāʻupu.The flippers of Hāʻupu droop.
 [Said poetically of an aged person. The ridges on both sides of Hā’upu hill on Kaua’i go down gradually, with a rise here and there, but none is as high as Hā’upu itself.]

Hāʻupukele  (2) 21Ahuwale nā pae puʻu o Hāʻupukele.The row of Hāʻupukele’s hills are in full view.
 [Said of anything that is exposed or very obvious.]
  1485Ka moe kau a Moi, ke kahuna mana o Hāʻupukele.You sleep like Moi, the powerful kahuna of Haupukele.
 [Said to one who oversleeps. The kahuna Moi, of Hāʻupukele, Molokaʻi, had a long, prophetic dream of misfortune to befall his chief. The chief paid no attention and kidnapped a chiefess of Hilo. This led to a war with her sons, Niheu and Kana.]

Hauʻula  (1) 1314Ka hilu pani wai o Hauʻula.The water-damming hilu fish of Hauula.
 [Refers to Hauʻula, Oʻahu. In ancient days, two brothers came from Kahiki in the form of hilu fish. Near Oʻahu they separated, one going to the east side of the island and the other to the west. The younger brother was caught in a net at Hauʻula and divided among the families of the fishermen. When the older brother arrived he was grieved to find pieces of his brother’s body throughout the village. He went to the upland and dammed the water of the stream with his own body. After a while he rose, and the backed-up water rushed down, sweeping everyone into the sea. The pieces of his brother’s body were joined again into a hilu fish.]

hauwalaʻau  (3) 1304Ka hauwalaʻau a ka nui manu.The loud chattering of many birds.
 [Gossip that is spread abroad by a lot of busybodies.]
  1850Koʻolau hauwalaʻau.Koʻolau of the loud voices.
 [The inhabitants of Koʻolau, Maui, were said to be loud of voice.]
  2215Nāhiku hauwalaʻau.Much loud-talk Nāhiku.
 [Said of loud-voiced people. Refers to Nāhiku, Maui.]

hawaʻe  (1) 2409ʻO ka iki hawaʻe ihola nō ia o Miloliʻi.Here is the little sea urchin of Miloliʻi.
 [A boast. I am small but potent.]

Hāwaʻe  (2) 498Hāwaʻe kai nui.Hāwaʻe full of liquid.
 [An ignoramus. Hāwaʻe is a short-spined sea urchin that is full of liquid and has no meat. Also expressed as Hāwaʻe ʻiʻo ʻole (meatless hāwaʻe).]
  1072Hoʻokahi no Hāwaʻe, lauhue Kona.Only one Hāwaʻe, and poisonous gourds grow all over Kona.
 [In Kona, Hawaiʻi, a priest named Hāwaʻe lived during the reign of Ehukaipo. In every important heiau in that district, an image named for this priest was kept. Many people were sacrificed to these evil namesakes of Hāwaʻe.]

hawahawa  (2) 499Hawahawa ka lima.The hand is smeared with filth.
 [From a children’s game in which one made a number of sand piles and buried filth in one of them. When a child dug into the sand and drew out a hand smeared with filth, the others shouted this. Also used to imply that one is taking part in a shady deal.]
  500Hawahawa ka lima i ka haʻi kūkae.The hand is only soiled by the excreta of others.
 [Sometimes said when an adopted child proves ungrateful or is taken away by its own parents. All one gets are soiled hands.]

Hawaiʻi  (12) 321E kipi ana lākou nei. ʻAʻole naʻe ʻo lākou ponoʻī akā ʻo kā lākou mau keiki me nā moʻopuna. ʻO ke aliʻi e ola ana i ia wā e kū ʻōlohelohe ana ia, a ʻo ke aupuni e kūkulu ʻia aku ana, ʻo ia ke aupuni paʻa o Hawaiʻi nei.These people [the missionaries] are going to rebel; not they themselves, but their children and grandchildren. The ruler at that time will be stripped of power, and the government established then will be the permanent government of Hawaiʻi.
 [Prophesied by David Malo.]
  502Hawaiʻi nui a Keawe.Hawaiʻi, great island of Keawe.
 [Keawe (Keawe-i-kekahi-aliʻi-o-ka-moku) was a ruler of Hawaiʻi.]
  503Hawaiʻi palu lāʻī.Ti-leaf lickers of Hawaii.
 [This saying originated after Kamehameha conquered the island of Oʻahu. The people of Kailua, Oʻahu, gave a great feast for him, not expecting him to bring such a crowd of people. The first to arrive ate up the meat, so the second group had to be content with licking and nibbling at the bits of meat that adhered to the ti leaves. In derision, the people of Oʻahu called them “ti-leaf lickers.”]
  548He ʻauhau kōʻele na ka Hawaiʻi.A taxing of small fields by the Hawaii chiefs.
 [After Kamehameha united the islands, even the smallest food patch was taxed.]
  570He Hawaiʻi ʻuala Kahiki.An Irish-potato Hawaiian.
 [A term of derision applied to a native Hawaiian who apes the ways of the whites instead of appreciating the culture of his own people. Also said to one who is absolutely ignorant of his own culture.]
  1179I Kahiki nō ka hao, ʻo ke kiʻo ʻana i Hawaiʻi nei.In Kahiki was the iron; in Hawaiʻi, the rusting.
 [Perhaps the foreigner was a good person while he was at home, but here he grows careless with his behavior.]

more Hawaiʻi
1885Kū kaʻapā ia Hawaiʻi, he moku nui.[It is well for] Hawaiʻi to show activity; it is the largest of the islands.
 [Hawaiʻi should lead forth for she is the largest.]

Hawaiʻi kuauli  (1) 501Hawaiʻi kuauli.Hawaiʻi with the verdant country.

hāwanawana  (2) 1333Ka iʻa hāwanawana i ka wāwae, a ʻōlelo i ka lau o ka lima.The fish that whispers to the feet and speaks to the tips of the fingers.
 [The mahamoe, found in the sand. It is felt under the feet and picked up by the fingers.]
  2404ʻO ka haʻule nehe o ka lau lāʻau, he hāwanawana ia i ka poʻe ola.The rustling of falling leaves is like a whisper to the living.
 [It is the living who appreciate such things.]

hāwāwā  (4) 504Hāwāwā ka heʻe nalu haki ka papa.When the surf rider is unskilled, the board is broken.
 [An unskilled worker bungles instead of being a help. There is also a sexual connotation: When the man is unskilled, the woman is dissatisfied.]
  855He ʻo ʻia ka mea hāwāwā e ka heʻe nalu.The unskilled surf rider falls back into the water.
  1228ʻIliki ke kai i ka ʻopeʻope lā, lilo; i lilo no he hāwāwā.The sea snatches the bundle and it is gone; it goes when one isn’t watchful.
 [A person who fails to watch out often loses.]
  1233I make nō he hāwāwā; ʻauhea nō hoʻi nā lima a ʻau mai?It is inexperience that causes death; where are your arms with which to swim?
 [When you have something to do, learnm to do it and gain experience. Experience often saves life.]

Hāwea  (1) 2283Nā pahu kapu a Laʻamaikahiki, ʻŌpuku lāua ʻo Hāwea.The sacred drums of Laʻamaikahiki — ʻŌpuku and Hāwea.
 [These were the drums brought by Laʻamaikahiki from the South Sea.]

hāwele  (1) 505Hāwele kīlau i ka lemu, ʻāhaʻi ka puaʻa i ka waha; ke hele nei ʻo Poʻokea.Draw the fine loincloth under the buttocks; the pork finds its way into the mouth; Poʻokea now departs.
 [Poʻokea was a very clever thief during the reign of Kahekili of Maui. Whenever he eluded his pursuers, this was his favorite boast. Any reference to one as being a descendant or relative of Poʻokea implies that he is a thief who steals and runs.]

hāwena  (1) 483Hāpala ʻia aʻela i ka hāwena.Daubed with lime.
 [His hair may be gray, as one whose hair is bleached with lime, but he has no more wisdom than an inexperienced youth.]

he  (686) 4A aloha wale ʻia kā hoʻi o Kaunuohua, he puʻu wale nō.Even Kaunuohua, a hill, is loved.
 [If a hill can be loved, how much more so a human?]
  8Ahē nō ka manu o Kaʻula, he lā ʻino.When the birds of Kaʻula appear wild, it denotes a stormy day.
 [Signs of trouble keep people away.]
  9A hewa no he hale kanaka, ʻaʻohe hewa o ka hale kanaka ʻole.Fault can he found in an inhabited house and none in an uninhabited one.
 [Mistakes and weakness are always found in humanity.]
  11A hua a pane; a pane ka waha, he hoʻolono ko neʻi.A word in reply; open the mouth and speak, for a listener is here.
 [A command to speak up and tell what one has come for. Used in hoʻopāpā riddling.]
  42Aia i ka ʻōpua ke ola: he ola nui, he ola laulā, he ola hohonu, he ola kiʻekiʻe.Life is in the clouds: great life, broad life, deep life, elevated Iife.
 [The reader of omens knows by their shape and color whether clouds promise rain and prosperity, or warn of disaster.]
  62Aia ko kāne i ka lawaiʻa, hoʻi mai he ʻōpeʻa ka iʻa.Your husband has gone fishing and returns with bats for meat.
 [This saying comes from a children’s chant of amusement for coaxing a sea animal to crawl from its shell.]

more he
82ʻAi nō i ka ʻape he maneʻo no ko ka nuku.He who eats ʻape is bound to have his mouth itch.
 [He who indulges in something harmful will surely reap the result.]

he aha  (1) 2343No nehinei aʻe nei nō; he aha ka ʻike?[He] just arrived yesterday; what does he hnow?

hea  (9) 277E hea i ke kanaka e komo ma loko e hānai ai a hewa ka waha.Call to the person to enter; feed him until he can take no more.
 [Originally a reply to a password into a hula school. Used later in songs and in speech to extend hospitality.]
  514Hea ʻia mai kēia kanaka, malia he inoa i loaʻa iā ʻoe.Call an invitation to this person, perhaps you know the name.
 [A request to be called into someone’s home, usually uttered by a passing relative or friend who would like to pause and rest but is not sure that he is recognized by the others.]
  555Hea wawalo ke kai o ʻOʻokala.The sea of ʻOʻokala sends forth an echoing call.
 [Said in humor of any loud call. A play on ʻO (hail) and kala (proclaim).]
  1155I hea nō ka lima a ʻau mai?Where are the arms with which to swim ?
 [Don’t complain, use your limbs to do what you need to do.]
  1156I hea ʻoe i ka wā a ka ua e loku ana?Where were you when the rain was pouring ?
 [A reply to one who asks his neighbor for some of his crop. If he answered that he had been away during the rains, he would be given some food; but if he said that he had been there, he would be refused. It was due to his own laziness that he did not have a crop as fine as his industrious neighbor’s.]
  1533Ka pali walowalo hea kanaka o Mōlīlele.The eerie man-calling cliff of Mōlīlele.
 [Mōlī-lele (Mōlī’s Leap), in Kaʻū, is the place where an unhappy girl named Mōlī once leaped over the cliff in suicide. On each anniversary of her death the gale there blows a little harder than usual, and a person standing at the point from which she jumped can hear a rushing sound, as of a tapa-clad person running by.]

more hea
1694Ke hea mai nei ʻo Kawelohea.Kawelohea calls.
 [An expression much used in poems of Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi. Kawelo was a woman murdered by her husband. Her spirit entered a blowhole at Honuʻapo, where her remains had been tossed. Out of this hole she warned of impending trouble, and the people grew fond of this voice from the depths.]

heahea  (1) 2196Mū ka waha heahea ʻole.Silent is the mouth of the inhospitable.
 [It is considered rude not to call a welcome (heahea) to anyone approaching one’s home.]

Heʻaumakua  (1) 551Heʻaumakua hoʻoluhi, hōʻapaʻapa i ke kahuna.An ʻaumakua that does not help is a burden to the kahuna.

heʻe  (17) 572He heʻe ka iʻa, he iʻa kino palupalu.It is an octopus, a soft-bodied creature.
 [Said of a weakling.]
  573He heʻe nui, ke ʻula ala.It is a large octopus because it shows a red color.
 [A man went to farm one day and met another squatting carelessly as he worked. He made this remark, often used later to refer to a man who exposes himself.]
  711He kumu kukui i heʻe ka pīlali.A kukui tree oozing with gum.
 [A prosperous person.]
  716He lā koa, he lā heʻe.A day to be brave, a day to flee.
 [In life, there is triumph and defeat. In war, there is winning and losing.]
  958He uli na ka heʻe pūloa.It is ink from the long-headed octopus.
 [Said of a person clever at getting away with mischief. The ink of the octopus is its camouflage.]
  969He waha kou o ka heʻe.Yours is the mouth of an octopus.
 [You are a liar. A play on waha and heʻe in wahaheʻe (to falsify).]

more heʻe
1402Kaikoʻo ke awa, popoʻi ka nalu, ʻaʻohe ʻike ʻia ka poʻe nāna i heʻe ka nalu.The harbor is rough, the surf rolls, and the rider of the surf cannot be seen.
 [A stormy circumstance with uncertain results.]

heʻe hōlua  (2) 571He heʻe hōlua.One who rides a hōlua sled.
 [Said proudly of being a descendant of the chiefly families of Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, who were well known for their skill in hōlua sledding.]
  2703Pua ke kō, neʻe i ka heʻe hōlua.When the sugar cane tassels, move to the sledding course.
 [The tops of sugar cane were used as a slippery bedding for the sled to slide on.]

heʻe nalu  (6) 403Hāʻawi papa heʻe nalu.A surfboard giving.
 [To give a thing and later ask for its return. A surfboard is usually lent, not given outright.]
  504Hāwāwā ka heʻe nalu haki ka papa.When the surf rider is unskilled, the board is broken.
 [An unskilled worker bungles instead of being a help. There is also a sexual connotation: When the man is unskilled, the woman is dissatisfied.]
  649He kāʻeʻaʻeʻa pulu ʻole no ka heʻe nalu.An expert on the surfboard who does not get wet.
 [Praise of an outstanding surfer.]
  855He ʻo ʻia ka mea hāwāwā e ka heʻe nalu.The unskilled surf rider falls back into the water.
  1013Hō aʻe ka ʻike heʻe nalu i ka hokua o ka ʻale.Show [your] knowledge of surfing on the back of the wave.
 [Talking about one’s knowledge and skill is not enough; let it be proven.]
  2433ʻO ka papa heʻe nalu kēia, paheʻe i ka nalu haʻi o Makaiwa.This is the surfboard that will glide on the rolling surf of Makaiwa.
 [A woman’s boast. Her beautiful body is like the surf board on which her mate “glides over the rolling surf.”]

heʻe nehu  (2) 942He ua heʻe nehu no ka lawaiʻa.It is rain that brings nehu for the fishermen.
 [Refers to the rain that precedes the run of nehu fish.]
  1551Ka ua heʻe nehu o Hilo.The nehu-producing rain of Hilo.
 [The people knew the season when the schools of nehu fish followed the rain.]

Heʻeia  (1) 1561Ka ua kani koʻo o Heʻeia.The rain of Heʻeia that sounds like the tapping of walking canes.
 [Also said of the rain of Hilo.]

heha  (1) 619He ikaika nō nā ʻehu kakahiaka no nā ʻōpio, a piʻi aʻe ka lā heha mai a holo.The morning is full of strength for youth, but when the sun is high they become tired and run.
 [Said of the young who do not work as persistently as their parents — they start well but soon quit.]

heheʻe  (1) 874He paʻakai auaneʻi ke kanaka o heheʻe.Man isn’t salt that melts.
 [Said to encourage someone to venture out into the rain.]

hehi  (4) 576Hehi i ka pili.Trample on the relationship.
 [To abolish or disown the relationship.]
  822He moena ʻuki hehi wāwae.A mat of ʻuki made for the feet to walk on.
 [A person of little consequence.]
  1552Ka ua hehi ʻulu o Piʻihonua.The rain that treads on the breadfruit leaves of Piʻihonua.
 [Refers to Piʻihonua.]
  1637Kaʻupu hehi ʻale o ka moana.The kaʻupu bird that steps on the ocean billows.
 [A ship.]

hei  (6) 606Hei akula i ka ʻupena kuʻu a ka Lawakua.Caught in the drawnet of the Lawakua breeze.
 [Ensnarled by beguiling words.]
  964He ʻupena nae; ʻaʻohe iʻa hei ʻole.It is a fine-meshed net; there is no fish that it does not fail to catch.
 [Said of a woman who never fails to attract the opposite sex.]
  1334Ka iʻa hei i ka uahi.The fish caught by smoke.
 [Birds caught at night with a net after being attracted by a bonfire.]
  1363Ka iʻa lawe mai a ka makani, The fish brought by the wind, a stick is the net to catch them with.
 [Said of turtles that come to certain localities in the islands. They were driven ashore with sticks.]
  1397Ka ʻike a ka makua he hei na ke keiki.The knowledge of the parent is [unconsciously] absorbed by the child.
  2085Mai puni aku o hei i ka ʻupena a ka Lawakua.Do not helieve it or youll he caught in the net of the Lawakua wind.
 [Why believe all that? It is only wind.]

heiau  (1) 282E hiolo ana nā kapu kahiko; e hina ana nā heiau me nā lele; e hui ana nā moku; he iho mai ana ka lani a e piʻi ana ka honua.The ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars willfall; the islands will be united; the heavens will descend and the earth ascend.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time. The last part of the saying means that chiefs will come down to humble positions and commoners rise to positions of honor.]

hekili  (1) 2390ʻO ʻIkuwā i pohā kōʻeleʻele, ʻikuwā ke kai, ʻikuwā ka hekili, ʻikuwā ka manu.ʻIkuwā is the month when the dark storms arise, the sea roars, the thunder roars, the birds make a din.

Helani  (1) 1661Ka wai puka iki o Helani.The water of Helani that comes from a small opening.
 [Refers to Helani, Kona, Hawaiʻi. Here a coconut grove thrived, and from a small opening in the shell of the nut one could get water to drink.]

hele  (65) 278E hele aku ana i ka māla a Kamehameha, o Kuahewa.The proportion is reaching the size of Kuahewa, Kamehameha’s food patch.
 [The project is becoming too big. Kamehameha’s food patch was so huge that one border could not be seen from the other.]
  279E hele ana i ka ʻauwaeʻāina o lākou nei.Going with them to look over the best in their land.
 [Hawaiians didn’t like to be questioned as to where they were going and would sometimes give this answer. Paʻe was a moʻo woman who often assumed the form of a dog and went wherever she willed. One day, while disguised as a dog, she was caught by some men who didn’t know of her supernatural powers, and they roasted her. This roasted dog was to be a gift to their chief’s wife and was put in a calabash, covered with a carrying net, and carried up the pali. Just below the Nuʻuanu Pali, the men saw a pretty woman sitting at the edge of a pool. She called, “Oh Paʻe, where are you going?” From out of the calabash leaped the dog, well and whole, who answered, “I am going with them to look over the best in their land.” The men fled in terror, leaving Paʻe behind with the other woman, who was a moʻo relative.]
  280E hele ka ʻelemakule, ka luahine, a me nā kamaliʻi a moe i ke ala ʻaʻohe mea nāna e hoʻopilikia.Let the old men, the old women, and the children go and sleep on the wayside; let them not be molested.
 [Said by Kamehameha I.]
  305Eia ke kānaenae a ka mea hele: he leo, he leo wale nō.Here is an offering from a traveler: a voice in greeting, simply a voice.
 [Said in affection by a passerby who, seeing a friend, greets him but doesn’t stop to visit.]
  382E uku ʻia ke kanaka kiʻi lāʻau, he luhi kona i ka hele ʻana.The man who goes to fetch medicinal herbs is to be paid — the trip he makes is labor.
 [The person sent by the kahuna to gather herbs for a patient’s medicine was always paid by the patient’s family. If they faiied to pay, and the gatherer grumbled, the medicine would do no good. A person who was paid couldn’t grumble without hurting himself.]
  445Hana a ke kama ʻole, hele ʻopeʻope i ke ala loa.A person who has not raised a child may go along with his bundles on the road.
 [Said of an aged person who has no one to care for him. Had he troubled to rear children they could take care of him when he was old.]

more hele
505Hāwele kīlau i ka lemu, ʻāhaʻi ka puaʻa i ka waha; ke hele nei ʻo Poʻokea.Draw the fine loincloth under the buttocks; the pork finds its way into the mouth; Poʻokea now departs.
 [Poʻokea was a very clever thief during the reign of Kahekili of Maui. Whenever he eluded his pursuers, this was his favorite boast. Any reference to one as being a descendant or relative of Poʻokea implies that he is a thief who steals and runs.]

hele wale  (1) 211ʻAʻohe uʻi hele wale o Kohala.No youth of Kohala goes empty-handed.
 [Said in praise of people who do not go anywhere without a gift or a helping hand. The saying originated at Honomakaʻu in Kohala. The young people of that locality, when on a journey, often went as far as Kapua before resting. Here, they made lei to adorn themselves and carry along with them. Another version is that no Kohala person goes unprepared for any emergency.]

heleleʻi  (1) 1472Kamaliʻi ʻōkole heleleʻi.Loose-seated child.
 [A small child excretes anywhere he pleases. Such a child isn’t old enough to know anything.]

helena  (3) 360E nihi ka helena i ka uka o Puna; mai pūlale i ka ʻike a ka maka.Go quietly in the upland of Puna; do not let anything you see excite you.
 [Watch your step and don’t let the things you see lead you into trouble. There is an abundance of flowers and berries in the uplands of Puna and it is thought that picking any on the trip up to the volcano will result in being caught in heavy rains; the picking is left until the return trip. Also said to loved ones to imply, “Go carefully and be mindful.”]
  1091Hoʻolalau ka helena i Kualoa, piʻi ana i ka pali o Kānehoalani.In wandering about Kualoa, he ascends the cliff of Kānehoalani.
 [He goes off his course and thereby gets nothing. On the cliff of Kānehoalani stands a phallic stone, a symbol of bad luck when seen in a dream.]
  2310Niau kololani ka helena, hūnā nā maka i ke aouli.Silently, quickly he departed, to hide his eyes in the sky.
 [Said of one who has died suddenly.]

helēuma  (1) 2558Paʻa ka moku i ka helēuma.The ship is held fast by the anchor.
 [Said of one who is married.]

helu  (2) 1141Huli ke alo i luna, helu i ka ʻaʻaho.Lying face up and counting the rafters.
 [Lazy.]
  2306Neʻe papa ka helu a ka lā i Punahoa.The sun continued to scorch at Punahoa.
 [The fight didn’t end quickly.]

helu pō  (1) 1471Kamaliʻi ʻike ʻole i ka helu pō: Muku nei, Muku ka malama; Hilo nei, kau ka Hoaka.Children who do not know the moon phases: Muku is here, Muku the moon; Hilo comes next, then Hoaka.
 [The first part of a child’s chant for learning the names of the moon phases. Also said of one who does not know the answer to a question or is ignorant. He is compared to a small child who has not learned the moon phases.]

hema  (3) 181ʻAʻohe ma mua, ʻaʻohe ma hope, ʻaʻohe i ka ʻākau, ʻaʻohe i ka hema.Nothing before, nothing behind, nothing at the right, nothing at the left.
 [Utter, absolute poverty.]
  402Hāʻawi ka ʻākau, lū ka hema.The right hand gives, the left hand scatters.
 [Said of an extravagant person.]
  1840Kona hema, mai Puʻuohau a Kaheawai.South Kona from Puʻuohau to Kaheawai.
 [The boundaries of South Kona.]

hemahema  (3) 777Hemahema Kahuwā me Waimea.Kahuwā and Waimea are awkward.
 [These places are in the upland, where people are said to be awkward in handling canoes.]
  778Hemahema nō ka ʻiole, mikimiki ka ʻowau.When the rat is careless, the cat comes around.
 [Be on guard.]
  2156Miki ka ʻīlio kahu ʻole no ka hemahema.Stray dogs will take what one neglects to care for.
 [When one is careless with his possessions, they may be stolen.]

hemo  (2) 824Hemo ka pili a ka makemake.The companionship of liking has separated.
 [Said of the cessation of mutual affection.]
  825Hemo ke alelo o Kaumaka i ka wai.The tongue of Kaumaka came out in the water.
 [Said of one who has had a good trouncing. Kaumaka, a defeated chief, was put to death by drowning.]

hemolele  (1) 2060Maikaʻi Kauaʻi, hemolele i ka mālie.Beautiful Kauaʻi, peaceful in the calm.
 [Line from a chant.]

Heneli  (1) 273E hakoko ana ʻo Heneli me Keoni Pulu; ua lilo ke eo iā Keoni Pulu.Henry and John Bull wrestle; John Bull wins.
 [Hunger is routed by filling the stomach. Henry (Hunger) and John Bull (Fullness) wrestle until John Bull wins the match.]

heʻo  (1) 93ʻAkahi ka hoʻi ka paoa, ke kau nei ka mākole pua heʻo.Here is a sign of ill luck, for the red-eyed bright-hued one rests above.
 [Said when a rainbow appears before the path of one who was on a business journey. Such a rainbow is regarded the same as meeting a red-eyed person — a sign of bad luck. Better to turn about and go home.]

heu  (2) 2415ʻŌkalakala heu pānini, ke piʻi nei koʻu maneʻo.It is unpleasant here with fine cactus spines; I am beginning to itch.
 [A taunt when someone loses his temper.]
  2821Ua loaʻa i ka heu o ka pānini.Caught by the fuzz of the cactus fruit.
 [Has something to be irritated about.]

hewa  (35) 9A hewa no he hale kanaka, ʻaʻohe hewa o ka hale kanaka ʻole.Fault can he found in an inhabited house and none in an uninhabited one.
 [Mistakes and weakness are always found in humanity.]
  120Anu hewa i ka pō, he kuʻuna iʻa ʻole.Feeling the cold air of the night was all in vain; no fish was caught in the net.
 [A wasted effort.]
  130ʻAʻohe e hōʻike ana ka mea hewa ua hewa ia.The wrongdoer does not tell on himself.
  188ʻAʻohe mea make i ka hewa; make nō i ka mihi ʻole.No one has ever died for the mistakes he has made; only because he didn’t repent.
 [Urges repentance to one’s aumākua. Later came to include the idea of repentance before the Christian God.]
  277E hea i ke kanaka e komo ma loko e hānai ai a hewa ka waha.Call to the person to enter; feed him until he can take no more.
 [Originally a reply to a password into a hula school. Used later in songs and in speech to extend hospitality.]
  310E ʻike i ka hoa kanaka, o kipa hewa ke aloha i ka ʻīlio.Recognize your fellow man lest your love be wasted on a dog.
 [Love man above animals.]

more hewa
481Hāpai ke kuko, hānau ka hewa.When covetousness is conceived, sin is born.

hewahewa  (3) 45Aia i ke au a ka hewahewa.Gone on a crazy current.
 [Gone on his own wandering way.]
  975Hewa i ke ala a ka hewahewa.Goes amiss on the trail of the mentally deranged.
 [Said of one who is careless of results.]
  2006Lilo i Puna i ke au a ka hewahewa, hoʻi mai ua piha ka hale i ke akua.Gone to Puna on a vagrant current and returning, fnds the house full of imps.
 [From a chant by Hiʻiaka when she faced the lizard god Panaʻewa and his forest full of imps in a battle. It was later used to refer to one who goes on his way and comes home to find things not to his liking.]

  (2) 2046"Mai hea mai ʻoe?" “Mai Kona mai.” “Pehea ka ua o Kona?” “Palahī puaʻa ka ua o Kona.” “A pehea ke aku?” “ ka pā, ka malau.”“Where are you from?” “From Kona.” “How is the rain of Kona?” “The rain of Kona pours like the watery excreta of a hog.” “How are the aku fish?” “They run loose from the hook and the bait carrier.”
 [Said in fun of one suffering from loose bowels. Once, a chief was out relieving himself when his bowels were very loose. A runner came by the little-traveled path through the underbrush and seeing the chief there extended his greetings. The chief began to ask questions, which the runner answered. When the chief went home he told those of his household of the abundance of rain and the run of fish in Kona. His servant, whose curiosity was roused, asked, “What were you doing at the time?” “I was excreting, and my bowels were loose,” answered the chief. “He wasn’t talking about the rain and fish,” said the servant, “he was talking about you.” The chief was angry when he heard this, but it was too late to do anything about it.]

hie  (1) 2061Maikaʻi nō ka hoʻoipoipo i ka wā e lana ana ke koko; a pau ka lana ana, pau nō ka hie o ia mea.Lovemaking is good when the blood is circulating freely [in youth]; but when the blood ceases to circulate freely [as in old age] the pleasure one derives from it ceases.

hiehie  (1) 1605Kaʻū, hiehie i ka makani.Kaʻū, regal in the gales.
 [An expression of admiration for the district of Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi, or for a stately or outstanding person of that district.]

hihi  (2) 986Hihi kaunaʻoa, hihi i Mānā; aloha wale ia lāʻau kumu ʻole.The dodder vine creeps, creeps at Mānā; beloved indeed is the trunkless plant.
 [This saying comes from two lines of a chant. Said of a person with no family background, or to a parasitical person. The kaunaʻoa (dodder vine) is a parasite.]

hihia  (3) 984Hihia ka ʻōpae ma ka ʻumiʻumi.The shrimp is entangled by the feelers.
 [Like a shrimp whose feelers are entangled by some weeds trailing in the water, so is a person who is caught in an affair he cannot get out of.]
  985Hihia nā aho a ke kaweleʻā.The lines used in catching the kaweleʻā are entangled.
 [Said of any entanglement.]
  2512ʻO nā hihia wale ʻana i Moeawakea.All the entangling shrubbery at Moeawakea.
 [Said of entangling affairs. There is a play on Moe-awakea (Sleep-till-the-sun-is-high).]

hīhīmanu  (2) 1693Keha kaʻakepa ka ʻōlelo i Hīhīmanu.High and round about goes the talk at Hīhīmanu.
 [Said of one who boasts repeatedly.]
  2922Wehe ʻia ma luna o Hīhīmanu.Bared on the summit of Hīhīmanu.
 [A humorous reference to a person whose bald head is fringed with hair — like a bare mountaintop above a circle of mist.]

hihina  (1) 2783Ua hihina wale i Moeawakea.Fallen down at Moeawakea.
 [A play on the place name Moe-awakea (Sleep-at-noon). A humorous saying applied to those who fall asleep in the daytime or pass out in a drunken stupor.]

hihipeʻa  (2) 1491Ka nahele hihipeʻa o Paliuli.The impenetrable forest of Paliuli.
 [Paliuli, in Hilo, was like a mirage — at times seen and at other times unseen.]
  1511Ka ʻōhiʻa hihipeʻa o Kealakomo.The entwining ʻōhiʻa branches of Kealakomo.
 [Kealakomo, in Puna, Hawaiʻi, where ʻōhiʻa trees grow thickly together.]

hīhīwai  (1) 903He pō hīhīwai.A night for the hīhīwai.
 [A gainful night. The hīhīwai are freshwater shellfish. On starry nights, they climb upon the rocks where they can be seen and gathered.]

hiʻi  (5) 401Hāʻawe i ke kua; hiʻi i ke alo.A burden on the back; a babe in the arms.
 [Said of a hard-working woman who carries a load on her back and a baby in her arms.]
  575He hiʻi alo ua milimili ʻia i ke alo, ua hāʻawe ʻia ma ke kua, ua lei ʻia ma ka ʻāʻī.A beloved one, fondled in the arms, carried on the back, whose arms have gone ahout the neck as a lei. Said of a beloved child.
  987Hiʻikua waha ka ʻopeʻope, hiʻi ke keiki ma ke alo, uē ʻalalā i ka nahele.A bundle borne on the back, a baby in the arms, wailing in the forest.
 [Said of mothers fleeing in terror.]
  1391Kaʻikaʻi i ka lima, hiʻi i ke alo.Lead with one hand, carry with one arm.
 [Said of a mother with children born too close together.]
  1696Ke hiʻi la ʻoe i ka paukū waena, he neo ke poʻo me ka hiʻu.You hold the center piece without its head and tail.
 [You know only the middle part of the genealogy or legend. What about the origin and the latter part?]

hiʻialo  (3) 36Aia i Hiʻikua; i Hiʻialo.Is borne on the back; is borne in the arms.
 [When one has gone to a far place where he cannot be seen by loved ones, he is said to be in Hiʻikua; and when one is where he can be seen daily, he is said to be in Hiʻialo. Also said of a favorite child, who is carried in the arms or on the back. Also said of the ʻaumākua.]
  1272Ka ʻāina hiʻialo ʻo Honuakaha.The land of Honuakaha [where chiefs] were embraced.
 [Honuakaha, back of the Kawaiahaʻo Cemetery, was once the home of Kalākaua. Here chiefs were entertained with parties.]
  1737Ke kamalei a Kuluipō, ka hiʻialo a Pōnahe.Beloved child of Kuluipō, one embraced in the arms of Pōnahe.
 [A benighted person. A play on pō (darkness).]

hiʻikua  (2) 36Aia i Hiʻikua; i Hiʻialo.Is borne on the back; is borne in the arms.
 [When one has gone to a far place where he cannot be seen by loved ones, he is said to be in Hiʻikua; and when one is where he can be seen daily, he is said to be in Hiʻialo. Also said of a favorite child, who is carried in the arms or on the back. Also said of the ʻaumākua.]
  987Hiʻikua waha ka ʻopeʻope, hiʻi ke keiki ma ke alo, uē ʻalalā i ka nahele.A bundle borne on the back, a baby in the arms, wailing in the forest.
 [Said of mothers fleeing in terror.]

hiʻipoi  (1) 2509ʻO Makaliʻi ke kāne, ʻo Hiʻipoi ka wahine, hānau ke keiki he maikaʻi.Makaliʻi is the husband, Hiʻipoi (Cherished-one) the wife; a child born to them is well behaved.
 [Said of a child born in the month of Makaliʻi.]

hīkapalalē  (1) 10A hīkapalalē, hinolue o walawala ki pohā!This is what the Hawaiians thought the first white men to visit the islands said.
 [It is untranslatable gibberish repeated with laughter when one is told something utterly incomprehensible.]

Hikapoloa  (3) 2048Mai Hikapoloa mai.From Hikapoloa.
 [A play on the name Hikapoloa (Stagger-in-the-dark). Said of a stupid person, or of a drunk.]
  2367ʻO Hikapoloa ka makuakāne, o Lanihūpō ka makuahine.Hikapoloa was the father and Lanihūpō the mother.
 [Said of an utterly stupid person. A play on the names of the father (Stagger-in-the-dark) and the mother (Stupid chief).]
  2368ʻO Hikapoloa ka pō, he pō kiʻikiʻi, he pō naʻanaʻa.Hikapoloa is the night — a leaning night, a stretching night.
 [A play on ka pō loa (the long night). Said when one waits wearily for the night to pass, when there is nothing to do to shorten the hours.]

hikauhi  (2) 742Hele i Kaunakakai i Hikauhi.Go to Kaunakakai to seek Hikauhi.
 [After a time she returned with their daughter, whom they named Hikauhi.]
  1162I Hikauhi, i Kaumanamana.At Hikauhi, at Kaumanamana.
 [A man and his wife lived at Kaunakakai, Molokaʻi. While he was gone fishing one day, she felt the beginning of labor pains and went to her mother’s home in another village. When the husband arrived home and his wife was not there, he began to search for her. After he had searched fruitlessly for several days, his wife returned with their baby daughter, whom they named Hikauhi. Ever since that day, hikauhi has meant “in vain,” and when a person loses something and goes in search, one says, “I Hikauhi, i Kaumanamana.”]

hiki  (16) 125ʻAʻohe ʻai waiwai ke hiki mai ka makahiki.No food is of any value when the Makahiki festival comes.
 [Enjoy what you have now lest it not be of much use later. Gifts were given to the priests who came in the Makahiki procession of the god Lono. Then all trading and giving ceased. The farmers and fishermen received no personal gain until it was over.]
  146ʻAʻohe i hiki i Hakalauʻai, pae ʻē i Keolewa.Hakalauʻai was never reached, for he landed at Keolewa instead.
 [Before one could receive sufficient food for all his requirements, he found his efforts suspended. A play on Haka-lau-ʻai (Rack-for-much-food) and Ke-olewa (Suspend-in-space).]
  226ʻAʻole hiki i ka iʻa liʻiliʻi ke ale i ka iʻa nui.A small fish cannot swallow a big one.
 [A commoner cannot do anything to a chief.]
  261E ala kākou e ʻai o hiki mai kaumahalua.Let us rise and eat before the doubly-weighted ones arrive.
 [Let’s get going and eat before company comes. The people of Honokaneiki, in Kohala, were not noted for their hospitality. Travelers to Honokaneiki were called “doubly-weighted” because they had to swim to get there from the cliff of Kakaʻauki. With bundles, and being soaked by the sea, the weight of a person was doubled. In order to finish their morning meal before others arrived, the people of Honokaneiki awoke early, ate, and went about their work.]
  370E pale lauʻī i ko akua ke hiki aku i Kona.Place a shield of ti leaves before your god when you arrive in Kona.
 [A message sent by Kaʻahumanu to Liholiho requesting him to free the kapu of his god Kūkāʻilimoku. Kaʻahumanu was at that time striving to abolish the kapu system.]
  453Hānai kanaka, hiki ke hoʻoūnauna.Feed humans and one can send them on errands.
 [Said to people who adopt or take in children to raise. Children can be helpful.]

more hiki
744Hele ka hoʻi a hiki i Kealia, ua napoʻo ka lā.When one reaches Kealia at last, the sun is set.
 [Said of one who procrastinates. A play on alia (to wait).]

hiki ʻole  (1) 2785Ua hiki ʻole ka ihu o ka puaʻa ke ʻeku a peu.The snout of the hog can no longer root and prod.
 [Said of a man who has lost his sexual potency.]

hikikiʻi  (1) 1389Ka iho ʻana iho o ko luna poʻe, hikikiʻi ka ua o ʻEna.When those from above come down, the rain of ʻEna leans backward.
 [When drowsiness comes, one can lean back and relax contentedly. Also, when one feels mellow after imbibing, there is contentment and relaxation.]

hikina  (2) 2058Mai ka hikina a ka lā i Kumukahi a ka welona a ka lā i Lehua.From the sunrise at Kumukahi to the fading sunlight at Lehua.
 [From sunrise to sunset. Kumukahi, in Puna, Hawaiʻi, was called the land of the sunrise and Lehua, the land of the sunset. This saying also refers to a life span — from birth to death.]
  2393ʻOiʻoi ʻo Maui Hikina.East Maui forges ahead.
 [Those of East Maui are said to be very active and able to withstand anything.]

hiku  (2) 368ʻEono moku a Kamehameha ua noa iā ʻoukou, akā ʻo ka hiku o ka moku ua kapu ia naʻu.Six of Kamehameha’s islands are free to you, but the seventh is kapu, and is for me alone.
 [This was uttered by Kamehameha after Oʻahu was conquered. The islands from Hawaiʻi to Oʻahu, which included Maui, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, and Kahoʻolawe, belonged to his people. But the seventh “island,” Kaʻahumanu, was his alone. Anyone who attempted to take her from him would be put to death.]
  1311Ka hiku o nā lani.The seventh of the heavenly ones.
 [A term of affection for Kalākaua, who was the seventh ruler of united Hawai’i.]

Hiku  (1) 1222I laila i luakaha ai me Hiku.There [he] whiled the time with Hiku.
 [Had an enjoyable time. Hiku was a hero who lived in the mountains of Hawaiʻi and was thought of as a man who lived happily.]

hikuhiku  (1) 577He hikuhiku nā kini akua.The host of gods are many, many.
 [There are none higher than the gods.]

hilahila  (3) 2ʻAʻa i ka hula, waiho ka hilahila i ka hale.When one wants to dance the hula, bashfulness should be left at home.
 [Also expressed Aʻo i ka hula,....]
  783He maʻi nui ka hilahila.Humiliation is a great disease.
 [Shame and humiliation can make one sick at heart.]
  866He ʻoʻopu kuʻia, ka iʻa hilahila o Kawainui.A bashful ʻoʻopu, the shy fish of Kawainui.
 [Said of a bashful person. Kawainui at Kailua was one of the largest ponds on Oʻahu.]

Hīlea  (1) 1030Hoʻi i Hīlea i kalo ʻekaʻeka.Go to Hīlea of the dirty taro.
 [Said of a careless person. Once, Kohāikalani, a chief of Kaʻū, was living at Punaluʻu. Poi was brought for him from various parts of the district, and a tiny speck of taro peeling was found in the poi from Hīlea. The makers of the poi were put to death. To say that someone hails from Hīlea is to say that he is unclean.]

hili  (1) 993Hili hewa ka manaʻo ke ʻole ke kūkākūkā.Ideas run wild without discussion.
 [Discussion brings ideas together into a plan.]

Hīlia  (2) 1352Ka iʻa kā wāwae o Hīlia.The fish of Hīlia, kicked by the feet.
 [Mullet. Hīlia is a place on Molokaʻi where mullet often come in schools near the shore. The people, wading into the water, would kick the fish ashore where others would pick them up.]
  1805Kioea ʻai pua ʻiʻi o Hīlia.The kioea bird that eats the fish spawn of Hīlia.
 [Said of the kioea (curlew), an eater of little fish, or of a big fellow who gobbles up little ones.]

Hilina  (1) 2321No Hilina paha, ke huikau ala ka ʻōlelo.Perhaps he was born in Hilina — his speech is confused.
 [A play on hili (confusion). Hilina is the month of winds.]

hilinaʻi  (4) 994Hilinaʻi Puna, kālele iā Kaʻū.Puna leans and reclines on Kaʻū.
 [Said of one who leans or depends on another. The ancestors of these two districts were originally of one extended family. The time came when those of each district decided to have a name of their own, without breaking the link entirely. Those in Kaʻū referred to themselves as the Mākaha and those in Puna as the Kumākaha. These names are mentioned in the chants of the chiefs of Kaʻū.]
  995Hilinaʻi Puna kālele ia Kaʻū, hilinaʻi Kaʻū kālele ia Puna.Puna trusts and leans on Kaʻū, Kaʻū trusts and leans on Puna.
 [The people of Puna and Kaʻū are related.]
  2622Peʻe kua o Kaʻulahaimalama; o Kekūhaupiʻo ka makua; hilinaʻi aʻe i ka pale kai, kālele moku aʻe ma hope.Kaʻulahaimalama is secretive; Kekūhaupiʻo (Stands-leaning) is her father; she leans against the canoe side and rests against the back of the canoe.
 [Said of one who tries to conceal the true offender by pretending to know nothing.]

Hilinehu  (2) 100Ako ʻē ka hale a paʻa, a i ke komo ʻana mai o ka hoʻoilo, ʻaʻole e kulu i ka ua o Hilinehu.Thatch the house beforehand so when winter comes it will not leak in the shower of Hilinehu.
 [Do not procrastinate; make preparations for the future now.]
  996Hilinehu ka malama, kū ka nehu.Hilinehu is the month when the nehu fish appears.

Hilo  (38) 37Aia i Hilo ʻo Alanaio; aia i Puna ʻo Kapoho; aia i Laupāhoehoe ʻo Ulekiʻi.In Hilo is Alanaio; in Puna is Kapoho; in Laupāhoehoe is Ulekii.
 [A vulgar play on place names, calling attention to private parts, which are omens of disappointment when seen in dreams. An expression of contempt for one who brings bad luck. Alanaio (Way-of-the-pinworm), the anus, is in Hilo; Kapoho (The Container), the vagina, is in Puna; and Ulekiʻi (Rigid Penis) is in Laupāhoehoe.]
  91ʻAkahi au a ʻike i ka ʻino o Hilo.It is the first time I have seen a Hilo storm.
 [For the first time I have met with evil people who wish to harm me.]
  242ʻAu umauma o Hilo i ka wai.Hilo has breasted the water.
 [To weather the storm. The district of Hilo had many gulches and streams and was difficult to cross.]
  260E ala e Kaʻū, kahiko o Mākaha; e ala e Puna, Puna Kumākaha; e ala e Hilo naʻau kele!Arise, O Kaʻū of ancient descent; arise, O Puna of the Kumākaha group; arise, O Hilo of the water-soaked foundation!
 [A rallying call. These names are found in Kaʻū and Puna chants of the chiefs. The Mākaha and Ku-mākaha (Like-the-Mākaha) were originally one. Some moved to Puna and took the name Kumākaha.]
  330ʻEleʻele Hilo, panopano i ka ua.Dark is Hilo, clouded with the rain.
 [Hilo is always rainy.]
  424Hala ka Puʻulena aia i Hilo ua ʻimi akula iā Papalauahi.The Puʻulena breeze is gone to Hilo in search of Papalauahi.
 [Said of one who has gone away or of one who finds himself too late to do anything.]

more Hilo
436Halulu me he kapuaʻi kanaka lā ka ua o Hilo.The rain of Hilo makes a rumbling sound like the treading of feet.

hilu  (3) 578He hilu na ke aliʻi.A hilu belonging to a chief.
 [When a pregnant woman longed for hilu fish, the child born to her would be a very quiet, well-behaved person. Because chiefs liked reserved, well-mannered people, such persons were often found in the royal courts, and were referred to as the chief’s hilu fish.]
  1007Hilu ka iʻa, he iʻa noʻenoʻe.The fish is the hilu, an attractive one.
 [A quiet, well-behaved person. When a pregnant woman longed for hilu fish, the child born to her would be well-mannered, quiet, and unobtrusive.]
  1314Ka hilu pani wai o Hauʻula.The water-damming hilu fish of Hauula.
 [Refers to Hauʻula, Oʻahu. In ancient days, two brothers came from Kahiki in the form of hilu fish. Near Oʻahu they separated, one going to the east side of the island and the other to the west. The younger brother was caught in a net at Hauʻula and divided among the families of the fishermen. When the older brother arrived he was grieved to find pieces of his brother’s body throughout the village. He went to the upland and dammed the water of the stream with his own body. After a while he rose, and the backed-up water rushed down, sweeping everyone into the sea. The pieces of his brother’s body were joined again into a hilu fish.]

hīmeni  (1) 150ʻAʻohe i maneʻo iho ke kumu pepeiao i kau hīmeni.Even the base of the ear isn’t tickled by your song.
 [A rude remark to one whose song or story is not appealing.]

hina  (10) 282E hiolo ana nā kapu kahiko; e hina ana nā heiau me nā lele; e hui ana nā moku; he iho mai ana ka lani a e piʻi ana ka honua.The ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars willfall; the islands will be united; the heavens will descend and the earth ascend.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time. The last part of the saying means that chiefs will come down to humble positions and commoners rise to positions of honor.]
  579He hina na ka ʻaʻaliʻi kūmakani, he ʻulaʻa pū me ka lepo.When the wind-resisting ʻaʻaliʻi falls, it lifts the sod up with its roots.
 [A boast: When I, a powerful man, fall, others will fall with me.]
  905He poʻi na kai uli, kai koʻo, ʻaʻohe hina pūkoʻa.Though the sea he deep and rough, the coral rock remains standing.
 [Said of one who remains calm in the face of difficulty.]
  935He pūmaiʻa: loaʻa i ke kīkīao, hina.A banana stump: when a gust of wind comes, it falls.
 [A weakling who is blown down by every trouble that comes.]
  957He ʻūlili holoholo kahakai, pā i ke kai nui, hina.A sandpiper running about on the beach, when struck by a big wave, falls.
 [A disparaging remark applied to a weakling who cannot fight.]
  1697Ke hina ke uahi ma kahi ʻaoʻao he mea mākole ko ia ʻaoʻao.When the smoke falls on one side, someone on that side will feel a smarting of the eyes.
 [Where strong words fall, feelings are hurt.]

more hina
2081Mai ʻōlelo i ke kuapuʻu e kū pololei, o hina auaneʻi.Dont tell the hunchback to stand up straight lest he fall down.
 [Don’t go around correcting others.]

Hina  (4) 691He keʻu na kaʻalae a Hina.A croaking by Hina’s mudhen.
 [A warning of trouble. The cry of a mudhen at night is a warning of distress.]
  2194Molokaʻi nui a Hina.Great Molokaʻi, land of Hina.
 [The goddess Hina is said to be the mother of Molokaʻi.]
  2698Pua ka uahi o kāʻeʻaʻeʻa moku o Hina.Up rose the smoke of the experts of the island of Hina.
 [Said of the quickness of the athletes of Molokaʻi — they were so fast that they smoked.]
  2830Ua moʻa ka maiʻa, he keiki māmā ka Hina.The bananas are cooked, [and remember that] Hina has a swift son.
 [Let’s finish this before we are caught. This saying comes from the legend of Māui and the mudhens. For a long time he tried to catch them in order to learn the secret of making fire. One day he overheard one of them saying these words. He caught them before they could hide and forced them to yield the secret of fire.]

hinahina  (1) 1526Ka pali hinahina o Kāʻanapali.The gray hills of Kāʻanapali.

Hinaiaʻeleʻele  (3) 2369ʻO Hinaiaʻeleʻele ka malama, ʻāluka ka pala a ka ʻōhiʻa.Hinaiaʻeleʻele is the month when the mountain apples open everywhere.
  2370ʻO Hinaiaʻeleʻele ka malama, ʻeleʻele ka umauma o ke kōlea.Hinaiaʻeleʻele is the month in which the breast feathers of the plovers darken.
  2371ʻO Hinaiaʻeleʻele ke kāne, ʻo Pōʻeleʻi ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he keiki ʻakena a haʻanui.Hinaiaʻeleʻele is the husband, Pōʻeleʻi (Supreme-dark-one) the wife; a child born to them is a boaster and an exaggerator.
 [Said of a child born in the month of Hinaiaʻeleʻele.]

hīnālea  (1) 1255Ipu kai hīnālea.A dish of hīnālea fish.
 [A rude remark about one with bad breath, or one whose nose has the foul odor of catarrh. The hīnālea was a favorite fish for a dish called iʻa hoʻomelu. Before preparation, the fish was left to decompose slightly, thus acquiring a strong odor. After seasoning with salt, kukui relish, and chili pepper, the fish lost its unpleasant smell.]

hinana  (1) 329E lawe i ke ō, he hinana ka iʻa kuhi lima.Take vegetable food; the hinana is a fish that can he caught in the hand.
 [A suggestion to take taro, poi, potato, or breadfruit along on the journey and not worry about meats, which can be found along the way. First uttered by Pele in a chant about the winds of Kauaʻi.]

Hinauluʻōhiʻa  (1) 2304Nāwele ka maka o Hinauluʻōhiʻa.Pale is the face of Hinauluʻōhiʻa.
 [Said of the pink rim around the blossom end of the white mountain apple. Refers to the goddess Hina.]

hinolue  (1) 10A hīkapalalē, hinolue o walawala ki pohā!This is what the Hawaiians thought the first white men to visit the islands said.
 [It is untranslatable gibberish repeated with laughter when one is told something utterly incomprehensible.]

hinu  (2) 281E hinu auaneʻi nā nuku, he pōmaikaʻi ko laila.Where the mouths are shiny [with fat food], prosperity is there.
 [The prosperous have the richest food to eat.]
  1679Ke amo ʻia aʻela ʻo Kaʻaoʻao; ke kahe maila ka hinu.Kaʻaoʻao is being carried by; the grease is flowing from his body.
 [What has happened to him is very obvious. Kaʻaoʻao, angry with his brother Kekaulike, ruthlessly destroyed the crops in his absence. The latter followed him up to Haleakalā and there slew him. His decomposed body was found later by his followers.]

hinuhinu  (1) 1008Hinuhinu ka ihu, pohā ka ʻauwae.When the nose shines, the chin gets a blow.
 [Said of a drunken person who gets into a fight.]

hio  (1) 2188Moku ka ihu iā Hio lā!Bitten off is the nose by Hio!
 [Used by adults to frighten children into staying at home. Hio was an akua (ghost) who wandered about peering into the doors of homes and biting off the noses of those who annoyed him. He escaped when his companions were caught in a fishnet set by the super-natural hero Kamiki at Kuʻunaakeakua (Net-let-down-for-akua), Makalawena, Kona.]

hiohio  (2) 1009Hiohio ka makani i lima o Kapaliwaiʻole.The wind whistles on Kapaliwaiʻole.
 [How ignorance speaks! Kapaliwaiʻole is in Kaʻū.]
  1996Liʻiliʻi nīoi hiohio ka waha.Small pepper makes the mouth blow.
 [Said of one who is small but potent.]

hiʻolani  (2) 988Hiʻolani ana me Niolopua.Sleeping with Niolopua.
 [Just dozing.]
  1010Hiʻolani i ka noe.Sleeping in the fog.
 [Sleeping off a drunken stupor.]

hiolo  (3) 282E hiolo ana nā kapu kahiko; e hina ana nā heiau me nā lele; e hui ana nā moku; he iho mai ana ka lani a e piʻi ana ka honua.The ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars willfall; the islands will be united; the heavens will descend and the earth ascend.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time. The last part of the saying means that chiefs will come down to humble positions and commoners rise to positions of honor.]
  938He puʻupā hiolo wale nō i ka leo.An obstructing wall falling down at the sound of the voice.
 [Said of stubbornness and obstinacy that are removed by gentle coaxing.]
  1011Hiolo ka pali kū, nahā ka pali paʻa.The standing precipice falls, the solid clff breaks.
 [The resistance is broken down at last.]

hiu  (1) 1012Hiu a wela, lawe a lilo!Strike while hot, and take it away!
 [Make passionate love and take possession. Win the game and take the prize.]

hiʻu  (5) 955He ula no ka naele, panau no ka hiʻu komo i ke ale.That is a lobster of a sea cave, with one flip of the tail he is in the rocky cavern.
 [Said of an independent person who knows how to take care of himself.]
  1696Ke hiʻi la ʻoe i ka paukū waena, he neo ke poʻo me ka hiʻu.You hold the center piece without its head and tail.
 [You know only the middle part of the genealogy or legend. What about the origin and the latter part?]
  2117Mālama i ke kala ka iʻa hiʻu ʻoi.Watch out for the kala, the fish with a sharp tail.
 [A warning to beware of a person who is well equipped to defend himself. The kala, a surgeonfish, has a spike near the caudal fin which it uses in defense.]
  2177Moe poʻo a hiʻu i Kalaeʻoiʻo.Lies head and tail at Kalaeʻoiʻo.
 [Is up to the neck in trouble. Processions of ghosts were sometimes encountered here. If one had a relative among them, he escaped death; if not, he perished.]
  2293Naueue ka hiʻu o ka iʻa lewa i ke kai.The tails of thefish that move in the sea tremble.
 [Said of fish, such as the hīnālea, in the cold month Welehu. The tails of the hīnālea bend as they seek hollows in the corals for hiding.]

hiwa  (1) 2612Pāuli hiwa ka lani o Hilo.Black with rain clouds is the sky of Hilo.
 [Sometimes said in humor when a dark-skinned person is seen.]

  (1) 1013 aʻe ka ʻike heʻe nalu i ka hokua o ka ʻale.Show [your] knowledge of surfing on the back of the wave.
 [Talking about one’s knowledge and skill is not enough; let it be proven.]

hō mai  (2) 1055Hō mai ka ihu, a hele aʻe au.Give hither the nose ere I go.
 [Kiss me ere I depart.]
  2596Pā mai, pā mai ka makani o Hilo; waiho aku i ka ipu iki, hō mai i ka ipu nui.Blow, blow, O winds of Hilo, put away the small containers and give us the large one.
 [Laʻamaomao, the god of wind, was said to have a wind container called Ipu-a-Laʻamaomao. When one desires more wind to make the surf roll high, or a kite sail aloft, he makes this appeal.]

hoa  (14) 244A waho au o ka poe pele, pau kou palena e ka hoa.After I’ve passed the bell buoy, your limit is reached, my dear.
 [A sailor’s saying used in an old hula song. When the ship passes the bell buoy on its way out to sea, the girl on the shore is forgotten.]
  259E ala, e hoa i ka malo.Get up and gird your loincloth.
 [A call to rise and get to work.]
  582He hoa ka ua no Alakaʻi.The rain is a companion to Alakaʻi.
 [Alaka’i, Kauaʻi, does not lack rain.]
  583He hoa kuilima no Lāʻauhaele.A companion to walk hand in hand with at Lāʻauhaele.
 [An interesting, friendly companion. A play on haele (go together). Refers to Lāʻauhaele, Kauaʻi.]
  584He hoa manu nēnē, he hoʻi nō a paumāʻele i ka hale.A goose mate returns to pollute the house.
 [Said to a mate whose relative disgraces the family by committing fornication or adultery with another member.]
  1017Hoa kīhei pili.A coverlet companion.
 [Said of a person with whom one is having an affair.]

more hoa
1020Hoa pupuʻu o ka pō anu.A companion to crouch with on a cold night.
 [A sweetheart or spouse.]

hoʻā  (2) 820He moʻa no ka ʻai i ka pūlehu ʻia; he ahi nui aha ia e hoʻā ai?Food can be cooked in the embers; why should a big fire be lighted?
 [A small love affair will do; why assume the responsibilities of a permanent mating? Said by those who prefer to love and leave.]
  1016Hoʻā ke ahi, kōʻala ke ola. O nā hale wale nō kai Honolulu; ʻo ka ʻai a me ka iʻa i Nuʻuanu.Light the fire for there is life-giving suhstance. Only the houses stand in Honolulu; the vegetable food and meat are in Nuuanu.
 [An expression of affection for Nuʻuanu. In olden days, much of the taro lands were found in Nuʻuanu, which supplied Honolulu with poi, taro greens, ʻoʻopu, and freshwater shrimp. So it is said that only houses stand in Honolulu. Food comes from Nuʻuanu.]

hōʻā  (4) 147ʻAʻohe ʻike o ka puaʻa nona ka imu e hōʻā ʻia nei.The pig does not know that the imu is being lighted for it.
 [Said of a person who is unaware that he is being victimized.]
  798He manini ka iʻa mai hōʻā i ke ahi.The fish is just a manini, so do not light a fire.
 [Said to one who suffers defeat in a practice session: “This occasion is a mere manini, a small fish, so do not let your temper be kindled.”]
  1991Līhuʻe hōʻā wahie lālā koa.Līhue lights fires with koa branches.
 [Līhuʻe, Oʻahu, once had a grove of koa trees whose branches were used for firewood.]
  2508ʻŌmaka ka iʻa, hōʻā aku ka lamalama i ka moana.If the fish is the ʻōmaka, light the torches at sea.
 [The ʻōmaka is not a fighting fish and is easy to catch. Therefore one need not be prepared too soon and can afford to take time.]

hoa ʻai  (1) 581He hoa ʻai waiū paha no Kauahoa.Perhaps he shared the breast with Kauahoa.
 [Said of one who is indifferent to the problems of others. A play on uahoa (hard) in Kauahoa, a warrior of Kauaʻi.]

hoa kanaka  (1) 310E ʻike i ka hoa kanaka, o kipa hewa ke aloha i ka ʻīlio.Recognize your fellow man lest your love be wasted on a dog.
 [Love man above animals.]

hoa like  (1) 301Eia iho ko hoa like o Malelewaʻa.Here is a suitable companion for you, Malelewaʻa.
 [Remark about an untidy person. A play on malele (strewn about) in Malelewaʻa, a place on Kauaʻi.]

hoa ʻōhumuhumu  (1) 585He hoa ʻōhumuhumu.A companion to whom one can voice one’s woes.

hoa ʻōlelo  (2) 231ʻAʻole ʻoe koʻu hoa ʻōlelo.You are not the companion to talk with.
 [You are not my equal.]
  2614Pau ʻōlelo me ka luina, he kāpena ka hoa ʻōlelo.No more talking to sailors, only conversing with the captain.
 [Said of a person who has become prosperous and no longer associates with former friends.]

hoaaloha  (1) 1210I ke kaua e ʻike ʻia ai nā hoaaloha a me nā kānaka koa.It is in war that one learns who his friends are and who among them is brave.
 [One learns who one’s friends are when one faces trouble. Said by Kaʻeo to the chiefs of Oʻahu, who were fighting against Kalanikūpule.]

hōʻaʻano  (1) 2049Mai hōʻaʻano aku o loaʻa i ka niho.Don’t go daring others lest [you] be caught between the teeth.

hoahānau  (2) 1523Kāpae ke kaua e ka hoahānau.Let kinsmen cease fghting each other.
 [Said by Kawelo to his opponent and kinsman, Kauahoa.]
  2924Wehe ka piko lā, e ka hoahānau.Undone is the navel string, O kinsman.
 [A family relation is severed. Said by Keopuolani to Kekuaokalani when she attempted to quell a rebellion, meaning that the tie of kinship between the two cousins, Liholiho and Kekuaokalani, was being severed by the latter’s refusal to be reconciled.]

Hoʻahewa  (1) 1014Hoʻahewa nā niuhi iā Kaʻahupāhau.The man-eating sharks blamed Kaʻahupāhau.
 [Evil-doers blame the person who safeguards the rights of others. Kaʻahupāhau was the guardian shark goddess of Puʻuloa (Pearl Harbor) who drove out or destroyed all the man-eating sharks.]

hōʻailona  (1) 580He hōʻailona ke ao i ʻike ʻia.Clouds are recognized signs.

hoaka  (2) 1471Kamaliʻi ʻike ʻole i ka helu pō: Muku nei, Muku ka malama; Hilo nei, kau ka Hoaka.Children who do not know the moon phases: Muku is here, Muku the moon; Hilo comes next, then Hoaka.
 [The first part of a child’s chant for learning the names of the moon phases. Also said of one who does not know the answer to a question or is ignorant. He is compared to a small child who has not learned the moon phases.]
  1978Lele ka hoaka.The spirit has flown away.
 [The glory of the land has departed. Also, the person is dead.]

Hoʻakaka  (1) 1015Hoʻakaka wale nō ka Kiʻilau.Kiʻilau merely explains.
 [A play on Kii-lau (Fetch-many), meaning one whose tongue knows where to fetch a lot to say. When words offend, the speaker responds that they are merely explanations not meant to hurt anyone.]

hōʻakamai  (1) 377E puʻu auaneʻi ka lae i ka ua o Kawaupuʻu, i ka hoʻopaʻa a ka hōʻakamai.The forehead is likely to be lumped by the rain of Kawaupuu if one insists on being a smarty.
 [A warning not to get cocky or smart lest one be hurt. A play on puʻu (lump).]

hoʻākua  (1) 344E mālama i ka iki kanaka, i ka nuʻa kanaka. O kākou nō kēia hoʻākua.Take care of the insignificant and the great man. That is the duty of us gods.
 [Said by Hiʻiaka to Pele in a chant before she departed for Kauaʻi to seek Lohiʻau.]

hoʻāla  (2) 1335Ka iʻa hoʻāla i ka pō, wai lama i ke ahi.The fish that wakes people up at night and causes a glowing of torches over the water.
 [The mālolo, or flying fish.]
  1477Ka manu hoʻāla i ke ao.The bird that wakes [everyone] at daybreak.
 [The rooster.]

hōʻale  (1) 1019Hōʻale i ka wai ua lana mālie.Stirring up still waters.
 [Said of one who stirs up controversies.]

hōʻaleʻale  (2) 1018Hōʻaleʻale Mānā i ke kaha o Kaunalewa.Mānā ripples over the land of Kaunalewa.
 [Said of the movements of a dance. A play on ʻaleale (to ripple like water), referring to the gestures of the hands, and lewa (to sway), referring to the movement of the hips.]
  2050Mai hōʻaleʻale i ka wai i lana mālie.Do not stir up water that is still.
 [Do not stir up contention when all is peaceful.]

hoaloha  (2) 397Haʻalele i Puna nā hoaloha ʻē.Left in Puna are the friends.
 [Said of one who has deserted his friends. Originally said of Hiʻiaka when she left Puna.]
  992Hiki maila nā hoaloha, ʻo Keʻolohaka lāua ʻo Hanalē.The friends Keʻolohaka and Hanalē have come.
 [The friends Vacancy and Hunger are here. Said in fun when one is very hungry.]

hoʻānu  (1) 1748Ke Kīpuʻupuʻu hoʻānu ʻili o Waimea.The Kīpuʻupuʻu rain of Waimea that chills the skin of the people.

hoʻānuānu  (1) 1108Hoʻopau kaʻā, he lawaiʻa paoa; hoʻānuānu ʻili o ka hele maunu.An unlucky fisherman wastes time in wetting his line; he merely gets his skin cold in seeking bait.
 [Said of an unlucky person who, in spite of every effort, gets nothing.]

hoʻāʻo  (2) 209ʻAʻohe puʻu kiʻekiʻe ke hoʻāʻo ʻia e piʻi.No cliff is so tall that it cannot be scaled.
 [No problem is too great when one tries hard to solve it.]
  283E hoʻāʻo nō i pau kuhihewa.Try it and rid yourself of illusions.

hōʻapaʻapa  (1) 551Heʻaumakua hoʻoluhi, hōʻapaʻapa i ke kahuna.An ʻaumakua that does not help is a burden to the kahuna.

hoapili  (1) 586He hoapili o Mākālei.A companion of Mākālei.
 [Said of an attractive person.]

hoe  (16) 315E kāmau iho i ka hoe a pae aku i ke kula.Dip in the paddle till you reach the shore.
 [Keep dipping your finger into the poi until you’ve had your fill.]
  319E kaupē aku nō i ka hoe a kō mai.Put forward the paddle and draw it back.
 [Go on with the task that is started and finish it.]
  327E lauhoe mai nā waʻa; i ke kā, i ka hoe; i ka hoe, i ke kā; pae aku i ka ʻāina.Everybody paddle the canoes together; bail and paddle, paddle and bail, and the shore is reached.
 [Pitch in with a will, everybody, and the work is quickly done.]
  686He keiki kālai hoe na ka uka o Puʻukapele.A paddle-making youth of Puuʻkapele.
 [A complimentary expression. He who lives in the uplands, where good trees grow, can make good paddles Puʻukapele is a place above Waimea Canyon on Kauaʻi.]
  797He mamo paha na ka poʻe o Kahuwā he maʻa i ka hoe ma ke kūnihi.Perhaps they are descendants of the people of Kahuwā who were in the habit of paddling with the edge of the paddle blade.
 [They are stupid people who never do things right.]
  809He māʻukaʻuka hoe hewa.An uplander, unskilled in wielding the paddle.
 [Said of an awkward person who blunders along, or of a man who is clumsy in lovemaking.]

more hoe
899He poʻe koa hoe.Canoe-paddling warriors.
 [A disparaging remark about warriors who are not good fighters.]

hoe uli  (2) 2449ʻO ke alelo ka hoe uli o ka ʻōlelo a ka waha.The tongue is the steering paddle of the words uttered by the mouth.
 [Advice to heed the tongue lest it speak words that offend.]
  2554Paʻa ʻia iho i ka hoe uli i ʻole e īkā i ke koʻa.Hold the steering paddle steady to keep from striking the rock.
 [Hold on; donʻt let yourself get into trouble.]

hōʻea  (2) 1238ʻInā e lepo ke kumu wai, e hōʻea ana ka lepo i kai.If the source of water is dirty, the muddy water will travel on.
 [Where there is evil at the source, the evil travels on.]
  1857Kū a keʻokeʻo; ʻaʻohe i hōʻea mai.Have stood until bleached white; no one came.
 [Said of a long, hopeless wait.]

hōʻeha  (1) 1336Ka iʻa hōʻeha lima.The fish that can hurt the hands.
 [The wana (sea urchin).]

hōʻeha-ʻili  (1) 1553Ka ua hōʻeha-ʻili o Waiehu.The skin-hurting rain of Waiehu.
 [A chilly, pelting rain.]

Hoʻeo  (1) 1460Ka makani Hoʻeo o Moanalua.The Hoʻeo, whistling wind of Moanalua.
 [Moanalua is on Oʻahu.]

hōhē  (2) 618He ikaika ke kanaka kaena i ka wā pilikia ʻole, akā he hōhē wale i ka lā o ka pilikia.A braggart is strong when there is no trouble, but flees when there is.
  1021Hōhē wale ka mea hewa.There is cowardice in the wrongdoer.
 [The person who wrongs another is often afraid to face him.]

hohonu  (6) 42Aia i ka ʻōpua ke ola: he ola nui, he ola laulā, he ola hohonu, he ola kiʻekiʻe.Life is in the clouds: great life, broad life, deep life, elevated Iife.
 [The reader of omens knows by their shape and color whether clouds promise rain and prosperity, or warn of disaster.]
  613He iʻa no ka pāpaʻu, he loaʻa wale i ka hopu lima; he iʻa no ka hohonu, noho i kaʻeaʻea.Fish of the shallows are easy to catch with the hands; but fish of the depths keep the fisherman wet with sea sprays.
 [Ordinary folks are easy to find but an outstanding one is not.]
  1022Hohonu nō ke kawa.A deep diving place indeed.
 [A topic that requires deep thinking.]
  2322Noho i ka hohonu me he iʻa lā.Remains in deep water, like a fish.
 [Said of one who won’t associate with others.]
  2925Wehe ke akule i ka hohonu.The akule fish takes off to the deep.
 [Said of one who removes himself from the scene of trouble.]
  2927Wehe pau i ka hohonu.Took off to the depths.
 [Said of one who goes and forgets to return, like fish going off to the deep sea.]

hoi  (2) 214ʻAʻohe ulu ka hoi.The hoi vine does not grow.
 [There is no interest in that. Said by one who lacks interest, or is bored with what is being said or done. A play on hoi (bitter yam) and hoihoi (interest).]
  2867Ulu ka hoi.The hoi vine grows.
 [There is interest in what is going on. A play on hoihoi (interest).]

hoʻi  (66) 4A aloha wale ʻia kā hoʻi o Kaunuohua, he puʻu wale nō.Even Kaunuohua, a hill, is loved.
 [If a hill can be loved, how much more so a human?]
  56Aia kēkē nā hulu o ka umauma hoʻi ke kōlea i Kahiki e hānau ai.When the feathers on the breast darken [because of fatness] the plover goes back to Kahiki to breed.
 [A person comes here, grows prosperous, and goes away without a thought to the source of his prosperity.]
  62Aia ko kāne i ka lawaiʻa, hoʻi mai he ʻōpeʻa ka iʻa.Your husband has gone fishing and returns with bats for meat.
 [This saying comes from a children’s chant of amusement for coaxing a sea animal to crawl from its shell.]
  86ʻAi nō ke kōlea a momona hoʻi i Kahiki.The plover eats until fat, then returns to the land from which it came.
 [Said of a foreigner who comes to Hawaiʻi, makes money, and departs to his homeland to enjoy his wealth.]
  92ʻAkahi hoʻi kuʻu ʻono i ka uhu kāʻalo i kuʻu maka.Now I long for the uhu fish that passes before my eyes.
 [How I would like that handsome fellow for a sweetheart. The uhu is a bright-colored fish, beautiful to look at, and tasty.]
  93ʻAkahi ka hoʻi ka paoa, ke kau nei ka mākole pua heʻo.Here is a sign of ill luck, for the red-eyed bright-hued one rests above.
 [Said when a rainbow appears before the path of one who was on a business journey. Such a rainbow is regarded the same as meeting a red-eyed person — a sign of bad luck. Better to turn about and go home.]

more hoʻi
284E hoʻi e peʻe i ke ōpū weuweu me he moho lā. E ao o haʻi ka pua o ka mauʻu iā ʻoe.Go back and hide among the clumps of grass like the wingless rail. Be careful not to break even a blade of grass.
 [Retum to the country to live a humble life and leave no trace to be noticed and followed. So said the chief Keliʻiwahamana to his daughter when he was dying. Later used as advice to a young person not to be aggressive or show off.]

hōʻi  (1) 608He iʻa laka nō lā hōʻi ka ʻina.The ʻina is easily gathered.
 [A retort to a person who frequently says, “If I had this” or “If I had that.” A play on ʻina (sea egg) and inā (if).]

hoihoi  (2) 138ʻAʻohe hale i piha i ka hoihoi; hāʻawi mai a lawe aku nō.No house has a perpetual welcome; it is given and it is taken away.
 [A warning not to wear out one’s welcome.]
  2846Ua pau koʻu lihi hoihoi i ka nani o Poka ʻAilana.I havent the slightest interest in the beauty of Ford Island.
 [Said when one has lost interest. This is a line from a chant.]

hoʻihoʻi  (1) 1649Ka wai hoʻihoʻi lāʻī o ʻEleile.The water of ʻEleile that carries back the ti-leaf stalk.
 [The pool of ʻEleile on Maui is famed in songs and chants. Visitors throw ti stalks into the pool and watch the water carry them all around before washing them downstream.]

hōʻike  (3) 130ʻAʻohe e hōʻike ana ka mea hewa ua hewa ia.The wrongdoer does not tell on himself.
  287E hōʻike mai ana ka lāʻau a ke kia manu.The stick of the birdcatcher will tell.
 [We will know how successful one is by what he produces. One knew whether a birdcatcher was successful by counting the birds on his gummed stick.]
  587He hōʻike na ka pō.A revelation of the night.
 [A revelation from the gods in dreams, visions, and omens.]

Hōʻike ʻAna  (1) 2073Mai Kinohi a Hōʻike ʻAna.From Genesis to Revelation.
 [From the beginning to the end. A favorite expression after Christianity was introduced.]

hōʻike ʻia  (1) 1161ʻIhi ka kua, meha ka alo; ka hua i ka umauma hōʻike ʻia.Sacred is the back, silent the front; the word on the chest, reveal.
 [An expression often used by chiefs. No one stands behind and no one else is here in my presence, so deliver your message to me.]

hoʻīlina  (1) 588He hoʻīlina ka make no ke kino.Death is an inheritance for the hody.

hoʻina  (1) 291E hoʻōki i ka hoʻina wale o hōʻino ʻia mai ke kumu.One should never go home without [some knowledge] lest his teacher be criticized.

hoʻīnana  (1) 1316Ka honua nui a Kāne i hoʻīnana a ʻahu kīnohinohi.The great earth animated and adorned by Kāne.
 [Kāne was the god of fresh water and life.]

hōʻino  (1) 291E hoʻōki i ka hoʻina wale o hōʻino ʻia mai ke kumu.One should never go home without [some knowledge] lest his teacher be criticized.

hoka  (2) 14Ahu ka hoka i Kapākai.A heap of disappointment at Kapākai.
 [Fooled and left stranded. In ancient times, two fishermen sailed from Kapākai, a small canoe landing between ʻUpolu Point and the heiau of Moʻokini in Kohala. As they were about to leave for Maui, a stranger asked permission to accompany them, and it was granted. Late that night one of the fishermen signaled to the other to toss the passenger overboard because he was doing nothing to help with the canoe. The passenger guessed what they were up to and cried, “Oh! I forgot my cowry sinkers at the canoe landing.” Cowry sinkers were valuable, so they turned about and retumed to Kapākai. Upon landing, the passenger leaped ashore. When asked where the sinkers were, he pointed to two half-buried rocks nearby. The fishermen were disappointed (hoka) in not obtaining the coveted cowry sinkers. In another version the saying originated at the birth of Kamehameha I on a canoe. At the landing at Kapākai his mother pretended illness, whieh drew attention to herself and gave Naeʻole the opportunity to seize the newborn baby and flee with him into hiding.]
  1874Kū i ka īpuka o ka hoka.Stands at the doorway of disappointment.

hokahoka  (1) 1975Lele au lā, hokahoka wale iho.I fly away, leaving disappointment behind.
 [Said of one who is disillusioned after giving many gifts. Wakaʻina was a ghost of North Kohala who deceived people. He often flew to where people gathered and chanted. When he had their attention he would say, “I could chant better if I had a tapa cloth.” In this way he would name one thing after another, and when all had been given him he would fly away chanting these words.]

hōkai  (3) 1046Hōkai ʻo Wawaia ke kūkini holo lalau.The runner, Wawaia, who ran out of his course, caused hindrance and delay.
 [Said of one who does not concentrate and wastes considerable time. Wawaia was a runner who, instead of running on the errand assigned to him by his chief, went on a visit before completing the errand, thus causing delay and rousing the ire of his chief.]
  1047Hōkai ua lawaiʻa makapaʻa.A one-eyed fsherman spoils the luck.
 [To meet a one-eyed man on the way is a sign of bad luck; to fish with him is worse still.]
  1048Hōkai ua lawaiʻa o ke kai pāpaʻu, he poʻopaʻa ka iʻa e hoʻi ai.A fisherman who fools around in shallow water takes home poʻopaʻa fsh.
 [The poʻopaʻa (hard-headed) fish is easily caught with hook and line.]

hōkake  (3) 721He lauhau, he iʻa hōkake kāheka.It is a lauhau, the fish that creates disturbances in sea pools. Said of a boisterous person.
  1695Ke hele maila ko Kaʻū; he iho maila ko Palahemo; he hōkake aʻela i Manukā; haele loa akula i Kaleinapueo.There come those of Kaʻū; those of Palahemo descend; those of Manukā push this way and that; and away they all go to Kaleinapueo.
 [Said when one tries to find out something about another and meets with failure at every turn. A play on place names: ʻū (a grunt of contempt) in Kaʻū; hemo (to get away) in Palahemo; kā (to run along like a vine) in Manukā; and leinapueo (owl’s leaping place) in Kaleinapueo.]
  2198Muʻumuʻu hōkake ipu kai.One-armed fellow who messes up his meat dish.
 [An expression of ridicule for a person who has lost a hand or is without hands or fingers. He messes up his dish in his attempt to pick up the food. Also said in humor of anyone who is clumsy with his hands.]

hōkeo  (1) 2328Noho nō ke kanaka a ka lā mālie, kau ka ipu hōkeo a ka lawaiʻa, nānā ana i ka ʻōpua.A person waits for a clear day, sets up the gourd that holds the fishermans paraphernalia, and observes the clouds.
 [To a fisherman, a clear day, his tools, and the signs and omens seen in the clouds are important.]

hōkū  (3) 2513ʻO nā hōkū nō nā kiu o ka lani.The stars are the spies of heaven.
 [The stars look down on everyone and everything.]
  2514ʻO nā hōkū o ka lani kai ʻike iā Pae. Aia a loaʻa ka pūnana o ke kōlea, loaʻa ʻo ia iā ʻoe.Only the stars of heaven know where Pae is. When you find a plover’s nest, then you will find him.
 [Said of something so well hidden that it will not be found. Pae was a priest in the reign of ʻUmi. He was so lucky in fishing that the chief desired his bones for fishhooks after his death. When Pae died, his sons hid his bones so well that none of the chiefs and priests could find them. The sons would say, “When you find the nest of the plover, then will you find him.” But ʻUmi enlisted the help of a noted priest of Kauaʻi, who saw the ghost of Pae drinking from a spring in Waimanu Valley. Thus were the bones of Pae found and made into fishhooks for the chief. The sons of Pae were reminded that the chief was using their father’s bones for hooks by his constant cry, “O Pae, hold fast to our fish!”]
  2515ʻO nā hōkū o ka lani luna, ʻo Paʻaiea ko lalo.The stars are above, Paʻaiea helow.
 [Refers to Kamehameha’s great fish-pond, Paʻaiea, in Kona, Hawaiʻi. Its great size led to this saying — the small islets that dotted its interior were compared to the stars that dot the sky. The pond was destroyed during a volcanic eruption.]

hokua  (2) 1013Hō aʻe ka ʻike heʻe nalu i ka hokua o ka ʻale.Show [your] knowledge of surfing on the back of the wave.
 [Talking about one’s knowledge and skill is not enough; let it be proven.]
  1492Ka nalu haʻaheo i ka hokua o ke kanaka.The surf that proudly sweeps over the nape of one’s neck.
 [Said of a wind which surges and blows from the back. A play on hokua (crest of high wave).]

Hokukoʻa  (1) 748Hele kīkaha ka ua o Hokukoʻa.The rain of Hokukoʻa goes quietly by.
 [Said of one who goes by without dropping in to see his friends.]

hola  (2) 751Hele nō i ka hola iʻa i ka lā.Fish poison should he used in the daytime.
 [Greater efficiency is achieved in the daytime. [cf 1158]]
  1158I hele no ka hola iʻa i ka lā.Poison fish while it is day.
 [It is better to work during the day. [cf 751]]

holāholā  (1) 1049Holāholā wale ʻia aʻe nō a pau ka pupuka.It will all he stripped away until all the ugliness is gone.
 [Said in answer to a remark that a small child is ugly.]

hōlapu  (2) 1050Hōlapu ke ahi, koe iho ka lehu.The fire blazed up, then only ashes were left.
 [After a blaze of temper, the ashes of remorse are left.]
  2086Makaʻā hōlapu kāheka.Makaʻā fish that makes a disturbance in the sea pool.
 [An over-active child who disturbs those around him. The makaʻā is an active little fish.]

hole  (3) 513He āhole ka iʻa, hole ke aloha.Āhole is the fish, love is restless.
 [Said of the āhole fish when used in hana aloha sorcery to arouse love.]
  1164I hole ʻia nō ka iʻe i ke kau o ka lā.The time to cut designs in a tapa beater is when the sun is high.
 [Do your work when you can do your best.]
  2856Ua wela ka nuku o Nuʻuanu i ka hole ʻia e ke āhole.Heated is the Nuuanu gap, by the āhole fish that go to and fro.
 [A vulgar expression referring to sexual intercourse.]

holehole  (3) 1051Holehole iwi.To strip the flesh of the bones.
 [To speak evil of one’s kith and kin, or to reveal confidences that will result in trouble for another.]
  1096Hōʻole ka waha, holehole ʻia nō ka iwi.Though the mouth denies one’s guilt, his bones are stripped anyway.
 [Said of those who deny guilt but are punished anyway. This saying originated in the time of Kamehameha I, when thieves and murderers were severely punished even though they claimed innocence.]
  2497ʻŌlelo ka waha, holehole ka lima.The mouth talks, the hand strips.
 [Said of one who says friendly words yet does unfriendly deeds.]

holehole iwi  (1) 1337Ka iʻa holehole iwi o ka ʻāina.The fish of the land that strips the flesh from the bones.
 [Goats. When one pursues them for meat, many a limb suffers skinning and bruises.]

holo  (23) 98A Keaʻau holo ka ʻōlohelohe.At Keaʻau ran the naked one.
 [Said of a state of destitution; to have nothing. A play on ʻau (swim) and ʻōlohelohe (naked).]
  162ʻAʻohe kana mai o ka holo o ka lio ia Hanalē; pākahi a ka lio, pālua a ka lio.How Henry made the horses run; one on a horse or two on a horse.
 [How hunger (Henry) made the fingers work in conveying poi to the mouth — with one fmger and with two.]
  219Aʻo i ke koa, e aʻo nō i ka holo.When one learns to be a warrior, one must also learn to run.
 [It is no disgrace to run when there is danger of being destroyed; perhaps there may be another day when one can fight and win.]
  549He au holo a ka ʻōlohelohe.A running place for the naked one.
 [Used when one is disappointed in an undertaking. To dream of nakedness is an omen of bad luck.]
  619He ikaika nō nā ʻehu kakahiaka no nā ʻōpio, a piʻi aʻe ka lā heha mai a holo.The morning is full of strength for youth, but when the sun is high they become tired and run.
 [Said of the young who do not work as persistently as their parents — they start well but soon quit.]
  799He manō holo ʻāina ke aliʻi.The chief is a shark that travels on land.
 [The chief, like a shark, is not to be tampered with.]

more holo
966He waʻa holo honua.A land-sailing canoe.
 [A horse, mule, or donkey used for transportation.]

holo lua  (1) 2430ʻO ka mūheʻe ka iʻa holo lua.The cuttlefish is the sea creature that travels two ways.
 [Said of a two-faced person.]

holoholo  (4) 207ʻAʻohe pueo keʻu, ʻaʻohe ʻalae kani, ʻaʻohe ʻūlili holoholo kahakai.No owl hoots, no mudhen cries, no ʻūlili runs on the beach.
 [There is perfect peace.]
  957He ʻūlili holoholo kahakai, pā i ke kai nui, hina.A sandpiper running about on the beach, when struck by a big wave, falls.
 [A disparaging remark applied to a weakling who cannot fight.]
  1705Keiki holoholo kuāua o Makawao.The lad of Makawao who goes about in the rain.
 [Said of a native of that place who is not afraid of being wet.]
  2012Liʻuliʻu wale ka nohona i ka lā o Hauola, a holoholo i ke one o ʻAlio.Long has one tarried in the sunlight of Hauola and walked on the sand of ʻAlio.
 [Said in praise of an aged person. There is a play on ola (life) in the name Hauola.]

Holoholokū  (4) 467Hānau ke aliʻi i loko o Holoholokū, he aliʻi nui; hānau ke kanaka i loko o Holoholokū, he aliʻi nō; hānau ke aliʻi ma waho aʻe o Holoholokū, ʻaʻohe aliʻi, he kanaka ia.The child of a chief born in Holoholokū is a high chief; the child of a commoner born in Holoholokū is a chief; the child of a chief born outside of the borders of Holoholokū is a commoner.
 [Holoholokū, sacred birthplace of the chiefs, is in Wailua, Kauaʻi.]
  2602Papani ka uka o Kapela; puaʻi hānono wai ʻole o Kukaniloko; pakī hunahuna ʻole o Holoholokū; ʻaʻohe mea nāna e ʻaʻe paepae kapu o Līloa.Close the upland of Kapela; no red water gushes from Kukaniloko; not a particle issues from Holoholokū; there is none to step over the sacred platform of Līloa.
 [The old chiefs and their sacredness are gone; the descendants are no longer laid to rest at Ka-pela-kapu-o-Kakaʻe at ʻīao; the descendants no longer point to Kukaniloko on Oʻahu and Holoholokū on Kauaʻi as the sacred birthplaces; there is no one to tread on the sacred places in Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, where Līloa once dwelt.]

holoholona  (2) 192ʻAʻohe nānā; he holoholona ia he mea ʻuhane ʻole; o ke kanaka nō ka nānā, he mea ʻuhane.Never mind; it is an animal, a soulless creature; take heed of man, for he is a creature with a soul.
  452Hānai holoholona, ʻaʻohe lohe i ka ʻohumu.Feed animals and no complaints are heard.
 [A retort by one who is criticized for raising animals instead of children.]

holo-kahiki  (1) 1634Kauō ulupau ka holo-kahiki.A sailor drags his anchor in many harbors.
 [A sailor has a sweetheart in every port.]

hololua  (1) 830He mūheʻe ka iʻa hololua.A cuttlefish is a creature that moves two ways.
 [Said of a two-faced person.]

holomua  (1) 2758Pūpūkahi i holomua.Unite in order to progress.

holopapa  (1) 841He niuhi ʻai holopapa o ka moku.The niuhi shark that devours all on the island.
 [A powerful warrior. The niuhi shark was dreaded because of its ferociousness. It was believed that a chief or warrior who captured this vicious denizen of the deep would acquire something of its nature.]

holoʻūhā  (1) 2096Makani holoʻūhā.The wind that brushes the thighs.
 [A cold wind that chills the legs of the fisherman.]

holowaʻa  (1) 1607Kau i ka lani ka holowaʻa ua o Hilo.Placed high in heaven is the rain trough of Hilo.
 [An expression of admiration for a person of regal bearing.]

holu  (4) 1053Holu ka pua o ka mauʻu, kapalili ka lau o ka lāʻau, māewa ka lau o ke ʻuki.The grass blossoms sway, the leaves on the trees flutter, the leaves of the ʻuki grass wave to and fro.
 [Said of speed in traveling. The traveler went so fast he was like a passing gust of wind that caused the leaves to sway or flutter.]
  1054Holu ka wai o Kaʻulili i ka makani.The water of Kaʻulili ripples in the wind.
 [A humorous saying applied to one whose proud swagger is like the movement of the ʻūlili (wandering tattler).]
  1665Kāwelu holu o Lanihuli.The swaying grass of Lanihuli.
 [Visitors to Nuʻuanu Pali know the kāwelu grass on the slope of the hill, dipping, rippling, and swaying in the breeze. It is mentioned in many chants and poems.]
  1722Ke kai holu o Kahului.The swaying sea of Kahului.
 [Refers to Kahului, Maui.]

Homa  (1) 1919Kū ma ka pā o Homa.Stood by the fence of Homa.
 [Standing in the way of disappointment. A Mr. Oliver Holmes (“Homa” to the Hawaiians) lived at Polelewa in Honolulu. A play on homa (disappointment).]

home  (1) 1315Ka home kaupoku ʻole.The home without a ridgepole.
 [A prison, ship, or any place that is occupied but is not actually a home.]

Honalo  (1) 48Aia i Kona i Honalo.It is in Kona, in Honalo.
 [A play on nalo (lost). You’ve lost it and it is gone.]

honi  (1) 433Halemano honi palai o uka.Halemano smells the ferns of the upland.
 [At Halemano, Oʻahu, the breezes bring the fragrance of ferns from the upland.]

hono  (1) 2218hono a Piʻilani.The bays of Piʻilani.
 [The realm of Piʻilani, a powerful ruling chief of Maui, included the islands of Molokaʻi and Lānaʻi, as well as all the bays of Maui whose names begin with hono.]

Honokeʻā  (1) 1816Kohala, mai Honokeʻā a Keahualono.Kohala, from Honokeʻā to Keahuaiono.
 [The extent of Kohala.]

Honokōhau  (3) 1056Honokōhau ʻōpae lele.Honokōhau’s leaping shrimp.
 [An epithet for the kauā of Honokōhau, Maui.]
  1503Kano ke kihi poʻohiwi o Honokōhau.Hard are the shoulder muscles of Honokōhau.
 [The people of Honokōhau, Maui, were said to be hard workers.]
  2140Mānuʻunuʻu wale kini o Honokōhau.Multitudinous are the inhabitants of Honokōhau.
 [Said of the people of Honokōhau, Maui, who were known for having big families.]

Honoliʻi  (1) 2374ʻO Honoliʻi, huewai ʻolāʻolā i ka nuku.Honoliʻi, where the water bottle gurgles at the mouth.
 [Said of those of Honoliʻi, Hilo, by Hiʻiaka. In ancient days, expert sorcerers there who prayed others to death muttered prayers that sounded like the gurgling of a water bottle.]

Honolua  (1) 1057Honolua kōhi lae.Honolua of the weighted hrow.
 [Said of the fishermen of Honolua, Maui, who never raised their heads lest they be expected to share their catch of fish.]

Honolulu  (3) 1016Hoʻā ke ahi, kōʻala ke ola. O nā hale wale nō kai Honolulu; ʻo ka ʻai a me ka iʻa i Nuʻuanu.Light the fire for there is life-giving suhstance. Only the houses stand in Honolulu; the vegetable food and meat are in Nuuanu.
 [An expression of affection for Nuʻuanu. In olden days, much of the taro lands were found in Nuʻuanu, which supplied Honolulu with poi, taro greens, ʻoʻopu, and freshwater shrimp. So it is said that only houses stand in Honolulu. Food comes from Nuʻuanu.]
  1423Ka lā ikiiki o Honolulu.The intensely warm days of Honolulu.
 [People from the country often claim that Honolulu is excessively warm.]
  1575Ka ua Kūkalahale o Honolulu.The Kūkalahale rain of Honolulu.
 [The rain that announces itself to the homes by the pattering it makes on the roofs as it falls. Often mentioned in songs.]

Honomaʻele  (1) 2237Nā keiki o Waipouli me Honomaʻele.Children of Waipouii and Honomaʻele.
 [A humorous reference to very dark people. A play on pouli (dark) in Waipouli and ʻele (black) in Honomaʻele.]

Honopū  (1) 2833Ua nīkiʻi ʻia i ke olonā o Honopū.Tied fast with the olonā cord of Honopū.
 [Honopū, Kaua’i, was said to produce excellent olonā in ancient days.]

honu  (5) 589He honu ka ʻāina he mea paneʻe wale.Land is like a turtle: it moves on.
 [Land passes slowly but inexorably from owner to heir.]
  590He honu maeaea akula ia.It is a māeaea variety of turtle.
 [He is a stinker. A play on māeaea (unpleasant smelling).]
  2219honu neʻe o Polihua.The moving turtles of Polihua.
 [Polihua is a place on Lānaʻi where turtles come to lay their eggs.]
  2716Pūhā hewa ka honu i ka lā makani.The turtle breathes at the wrong moment on a windy day.
 [Said of a person who says the wrong thing at the wrong time and suffers the result.]
  2717Pūhā ka honu, ua awakea.When the turtle comes up to breathe, it is daylight.
 [Said when a person yawns. Sleeping time is over; work begins.]

honua  (14) 119ʻAno lani; ʻano honua.A heavenly nature; an earthly nature.
 [Said of some ʻaumākua who make themselves visible to loved ones by assuming an earthly form, such as fish, fowl, or animal, yet retain the nature of a god.]
  282E hiolo ana nā kapu kahiko; e hina ana nā heiau me nā lele; e hui ana nā moku; he iho mai ana ka lani a e piʻi ana ka honua.The ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars willfall; the islands will be united; the heavens will descend and the earth ascend.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time. The last part of the saying means that chiefs will come down to humble positions and commoners rise to positions of honor.]
  718He lani i luna, he honua i lalo.Heaven above, earth beneath.
 [Said of a person who owns his own property, or of one who is sure of his security. The sky above him and the earth beneath his feet are his.]
  966He waʻa holo honua.A land-sailing canoe.
 [A horse, mule, or donkey used for transportation.]
  1316Ka honua nui a Kāne i hoʻīnana a ʻahu kīnohinohi.The great earth animated and adorned by Kāne.
 [Kāne was the god of fresh water and life.]
  1421Kalaʻihi ka lani, kūpilikiʻi ka honua.When the day is stormy, the earth is distressed.
 [When the chief is angry, the people are unhappy.]

more honua
1431Ka lani kaʻapuni honua.The chief who went around the world.
 [Kalākaua, who traveled to many lands.]

Honua-ʻino  (1) 1841Kona Honua-ʻino.Kona, [the] Bad Land.
 [Said in humor of Kona, Hawaiʻi, for within its boundaries is a place called Honuaʻino.]

Honuakaha  (1) 1272Ka ʻāina hiʻialo ʻo Honuakaha.The land of Honuakaha [where chiefs] were embraced.
 [Honuakaha, back of the Kawaiahaʻo Cemetery, was once the home of Kalākaua. Here chiefs were entertained with parties.]

Honuʻapo  (1) 2375ʻO Honuʻapo aku nō ia ʻo kahi o ka ʻahuʻawa.That is Honuapo where the ʻahuʻawa grows.
 [A Kaʻū saying about disappointment. The ʻahuawa was much used as fiber for straining ʻawa. A play on hoka (to strain, to be disappointed).]

Honuaʻula  (2) 1058Honuaʻula, e pāluku ʻia ana nā kihi poʻohiwi e nā ʻale o ka Moaʻe.Honuaʻula whose shoulders are pummelled by the Moaʻe wind.
 [A poetical expression for a person being buffeted by the wind. Honuaʻula, Maui, is a windy place.]
  1059Honuaʻula kua laʻolaʻo.Callous-backed Honuaʻula.
 [Said of the people of Honuaʻula, Maui, who were hard workers. The loads they carried often caused callouses on their backs.]

hoʻohaehae  (1) 645He ʻiwa hoʻohaehae nāulu.An ʻiwa that teases the rain clouds.
 [A beautiful maiden or handsome youth who rouses jealous envy in others.]

hoʻohāhā  (1) 2664Poʻe hoʻohāhā paʻakai.Salt gatherers.
 [A derogatory expression for people who do nothing that requires courage or stamina. Salt-gathering is an easy task that even a child can do.]

hoʻohaka  (2) 1060Hoʻohaka kai; hoʻohaka uka.Nothing from the shore; nothing for the upland.
 [A rough sea when fish cannot be caught gives the uplander no fish to eat.]

hoʻohē  (1) 676He kaua kamaliʻi, he hoʻohē wale.A battle by children shows much fear.
 [When fighting, children give up too soon and cry.]

hoʻohemahema  (2) 680He kā waiho hoʻohemahema.A bail left unnoticed.
 [Said of one who could be of help because of his skill and knowledge but is overlooked, like an unused canoe bail.]
  1543Ka pō nui hoʻolakolako, ke ao nui hoʻohemahema.The great night that provides, the great day that neglects.
 [The gods supply, but man does not always accept with appreciation. Guidance is given in dreams that man often misunderstands and neglects.]

hoʻohewahewa  (1) 1061Hoʻohewahewa ke aloha, aia i Puna i Nānāwale.Love failed to recognize him, for it is gone to Puna, to Nānāwale.
 [Said when an acquaintance or friend merely looks at another and offers no greeting. A play on nānā-wale (merely look).]

hoʻohiaʻā  (1) 1755Ke kope hoʻohiaʻā maka o Kona.The coffee of Kona that keeps the eyes from sleeping.
 [This saying applies not only to coffee, but also to love. To be in love with a person of Kona is to lose much sleep.]

hoʻohihi  (1) 2184Mokihana onaona o Maunahina, lei hoʻohihi a ka malihini.The fragrant mokihana berries of Maunahina, lei in which visitors delight.
 [Maunahina is a mountain on Kauaʻi, where the mokihana berries grow best.]

hoʻohihia  (1) 1338Ka iʻa hoʻohihia makau o ʻĀinahou.The fish of ʻĀinahou that tangles the fish line.
 [The ʻalalauwā, which came in great schools to the waterfront of Honolulu. Fishermen of all ages came with their poles to fish, and the crowds were sometimes so great that the lines tangled.]

Hoʻohila  (2) 2266Nanā ka leo o ke kai o Hoʻohila.Surly is the voice of the sea of Hoʻ ohila.
 [Said of one who speaks harshly.]
  2930Wela ke kai o Hoʻohila.Warm is the sea of Hoʻohila.
 [Praise for a fearless warrior, or a warning that danger is near. It is said that the presence of a shark is indicated by the warmth of the sea.]

hoʻohoa  (2) 216ʻAʻohe waʻa hoʻohoa o ka lā ʻino.No canoe is defiant on a stormy day.
 [It doesn’t pay to venture into the face of danger.]
  457Hana ka iwi a kanaka makua, hoʻohoa.First get some maturity into the bones before challenging.

hoʻohoihoi  (1) 1062Hoʻohoihoi makua hūnōai.A pleasing of a parent-in-law.
 [Said of one who begins with much enthusiasm but soon loses interest.]

hoʻohū  (1) 1064Hoʻohū ka ua i ka moana, pilipili ʻāina ʻole mai.The rain driving out to the ocean does not come near the land.
 [Said when a person snubs his old friends.]

hoʻohui  (1) 1063Hoʻohui ʻāina pala ka maiʻa.Annexation [is] ripe bananas.
 [A saying that cropped up when talk of the annexation of Hawaiʻi began. It was a sign of bad luck to encounter someone with a bunch of bananas while on a business trip. Hence this warning that annexation will bring bad luck to Hawaiʻi.]

hoʻohulei  (1) 1168I hoʻolulu, hoʻohulei ʻia e ka makani.There was a lull, and then the wind began to blow about.
 [There was a promise of peace and quiet, and then the disturbance was renewed.]

hoʻohuli  (2) 71Aia nō ka pono — o ka hoʻohuli i ka lima i lalo, ʻaʻole o ka hoʻohuli i luna.That is what it should be — to turn the hands palms down, not palms up.
 [No one can work with the palms of his hands turned up. When a person is always busy, he is said to keep his palms down.]

hoʻoilina  (1) 642He ipu hoʻoilina mai nā kupuna mai.An inherited container from the remotest ancestress.
 [Said of the womb, the container by which the family line continues.]

hoʻoilo  (14) 100Ako ʻē ka hale a paʻa, a i ke komo ʻana mai o ka hoʻoilo, ʻaʻole e kulu i ka ua o Hilinehu.Thatch the house beforehand so when winter comes it will not leak in the shower of Hilinehu.
 [Do not procrastinate; make preparations for the future now.]
  332E lei kau, e lei hoʻoilo i ke aloha.Love is worn like a wreath through the summers and the winters.
 [Love is everlasting.]
  423Hala ka hoʻoilo; ua pau ka ua.Winter is gone, the rain has ceased.
 [Hard times are over; weeping has stopped.]
  427Hala nā lā ʻino o ka hoʻoilo.Gone are the stormy days of winter.
 [Troublesome days are over.]
  1536Kāpeku ka leo o ke kai, o hoʻoilo ka malama.When the voice of the sea is harsh, the winter months have come.
 [First uttered by Hiʻiaka.]
  1753Ke kokoke maila ka Hoʻoilo.The rainy season is drawing near.
 [Beware lest you shed tears.]

more hoʻoilo
1968Lehu ke poʻo i ka uahi o ka hoʻoilo.The head turns ash gray in the smoke of winter.
 [Said of one who remains indoors constantly during the windy, rainy month of Welehu, huddled by a fireplace for warmth. Later applied to one who prefers being indoors.]

hoʻoipo  (2) 289E hoʻoipo ana me Niolopua.Making love with Niolopua.
 [Asleep. Niolopua is the god of sleep.]
  2645Pili aloha ʻo Kona, hoʻoipo i ka mālie.Love remains close to Kona, who woos the calm.
 [Kona is a land beloved for its calm and pleasant weather.]

hoʻoipoipo  (1) 2061Maikaʻi nō ka hoʻoipoipo i ka wā e lana ana ke koko; a pau ka lana ana, pau nō ka hie o ia mea.Lovemaking is good when the blood is circulating freely [in youth]; but when the blood ceases to circulate freely [as in old age] the pleasure one derives from it ceases.

hoʻokaʻawale  (2) 881He pali nui ka make e hoʻokaʻawale ana.Death is a sheer cliff that separates.
 [Death divides the living from the dead.]
  1065Hoʻokaʻawale i ka ʻōʻō mai ka lima aku.[To] take the digging stick out of the hand.
 [To deprive someone of work.]

hoʻokahakaha  (1) 651He kāhiko hoʻokahakaha nō ia kula.Finery belonging to the plain, put on display.
 [Said of a place when the blooming season arrives, or of a person dressed in fine array.]

hoʻokahi  (37) 143ʻAʻohe hua o ka maiʻa i ka lā hoʻokahi.Bananas do not fruit in a single day.
 [A retort to an impatient person.]
  203ʻAʻohe pau ka ʻike i ka hālau hoʻokahi.All knowledge is not taught in the same school.
 [One can learn from many sources.]
  320E keʻekeʻehi kūlana i paʻa. ʻO ʻoe hoʻokahi, ʻo wau hoʻokahi, kū mai i mua.Take a firm stand. You, by yourself, and I, by myself, let us step forth.
 [A challenge to one to step out of a crowd and fight man to man.]
  346E mālama i ka mākua, he mea laha ʻole; ʻo ke kāne he loaʻa i ka lā hoʻokahi.Take care of parents for they are choice; a husband can he found in a day.
 [Parents should be cared for, for when they are gone, there are none to replace them. One can marry again and again.]
  560He hālau a hālau ko ka niu, hoʻokahi nō hālau o ka niuniu.The coconut tree has many shelters to go to; but the person who merely aspires has but one.
 [Said in scom to or of a person of low rank who assumes the air of a chief. A true chief (niu) is welcome every-where he goes; a pretender is only welcome in his own circle.]
  591He hoʻokahi no wai o ka like.All dyed with the same color.
 [Identical.]

more hoʻokahi
697He koa ka mea hele hoʻokahi i ʻOʻopuloa.Only a warrior dares to go alone to ʻOʻopuloa.
 [Said of a venture fit only for the brave. The way to ʻOʻopuloa, Maui, was feared because of robbers.]

hoʻokala  (1) 299E hume i ka malo, e hoʻokala i ka ihe.Gird the loincloth, sharpen the spear.
 [A call to prepare for war or to prepare for the project at hand.]

hoʻokanaka  (1) 290E hoʻokanaka.Be a man.

hoʻokau  (1) 1248I ʻo Nana hoʻokau ka mālie.When Nana arrives, calm weather finds a place.
 [Good weather comes in the month of Nana.]

hoʻokauhua  (1) 1167I hoʻokauhua i ke kōlea, no Kahiki ana ke keiki.When there is a desire for plovers, the child-to-be will travel to Kahiki.
 [Said of a pregnant woman. If she craves plovers, her child will someday travel to foreign lands.]

hoʻokē  (2) 411Hāiki Kaʻula i ka hoʻokē a nā manu.There isn’t room enough on the island of Kaʻula, for the birds are crowding.
 [It is overcrowded. Kaʻula is a bird-inhabited island beyond Niʻihau.]
  1084Hoʻokē a maka.Deny the eyes.
 [Said of a very selfish person who eats without sharing, no matter who looks on with longing; or of one who does his own work only, without lifting a finger to help another. Also said of one who gives to his own children but refuses to share with the children of neighbors and relatives.]

hoʻokelakela  (1) 912He pono ka pākiko ma mua o ka hoʻokelakela wale aku.Better to be economical than too liberal.

hoʻokele  (1) 939He puʻu pale ia lae na ka hoʻokele.The cape is just something to be passed by the canoeman.
 [A boast — difficulties are mere trifles to an expert.]

hoʻokele waʻa  (1) 592He hoʻokele waʻa no ka lā ʻino.A canoe steersman for a stormy day.
 [A courageous person.]

hoʻōki  (1) 291E hoʻōki i ka hoʻina wale o hōʻino ʻia mai ke kumu.One should never go home without [some knowledge] lest his teacher be criticized.

hoʻokiʻekiʻe  (1) 361E noho iho i ke ōpū weuweu, mai hoʻokiʻekiʻe.Remain among the clumps of grasses and do not elevate yourself.
 [Do not put on airs, show off, or assume an attitude of superiority.]

hoʻokō  (1) 1229I lohe i ka ʻōlelo a hoʻokō, e ola auaneʻi a laupaʻi.One who hears good counsel and heeds [it] will live to see many descendants.

hoʻokohu  (1) 1085Hoʻokohu Kauaʻula, ka makani o ʻUlupaʻu.The Kauaula wind ofʻUlupaʻu claims honors that do not belong to it.
 [Said in derision of one who steals, then boasts of possessions that are not rightly his. Also said of one who claims illustrious relatives. The Kauaʻula wind is a wind of Maui.]

hoʻokolo  (2) 650He kaha luʻu ke ala, mai hoʻokolo aku.The trail leads to a diving place; do not follow after.
 [A warning to leave well enough alone.]
  1086Hoʻokolo aku i ka nui manu.Go inquire of the other birds.
 [Go and consult others. From the following story: One day a man went up to a mountain spring for water. On the way down he paused to rest, then fell asleep. An ʻelepaio lighted and, seeing the man’s gourd bottle, pecked a hole in the gourd. The sound of the pecking woke the man, who saw the water running out. In anger he threw a stone at the ʻelepaio and injured its leg. It flew away and met an ʻio. “O! ʻIo, I was stoned by a man,” ʻElepaio cried. “What did you do?” asked ʻIo. “Pecked the man’s bottle.” “Then the fault is yours,” answered ʻIo. ʻElepaio flew on and met Pueo. The same words were exchanged between them. So it was with ʻIʻiwi, ʻŌʻō, and all the others. ʻElepaio’s disgust grew greater with ʻAmakihi, who laughed at him in derision. Receiving no sympathy, ʻElepaio sat and thought and finally admitted to himself that he, indeed, was to blame.]

hoʻokomo  (1) 1087Hoʻokomo i ko waho i ko loko.Put inside that which is outside.
 [Eat.]

hoʻokū  (1) 179ʻAʻohe māʻalo kanaka o Hoʻokū.No one passes at Hoʻokū.
 [Said of a place that is avoided by people fearing trouble. At Hoʻokū, the smoke and heat of Pele were feared.]

hoʻokuakea  (1) 1301Ka hau hoʻokuakea ʻili.The snow that bleaches the skin.
 [Living in a land where it snows was believed to lighten the skin.]

hoʻokuʻi  (2) 1088Hoʻokuʻi a kole ka lae.Bumped and made a raw sore on the brow.
 [Said of one who is really in trouble.]
  2059Mai ka hoʻokuʻi a ka hālāwai.From zenith to horizon.
 [An expression mueh used in prayers. In calling upon the gods in prayers, one mentions those from the east, west, north, south, and those from zenith to horizon.]

hoʻokuli  (1) 509He aha ka hala i kapuhia ai ka leo, i hoʻokuli mai ai?What was the wrong that forbade the voice, that caused the deafness?
 [What causes you to refuse to speak or listen to me?]

hoʻokumu  (1) 1699Ke hoʻokumu nei Kumukahi i ka ʻino.Kumukahi is brewing a storm.
 [Said of one whose anger increases. Kumukahi is a point at Puna, Hawaiʻi.]

hoʻōla  (1) 946He ʻuala ka ʻai hoʻōla koke i ka wī.The sweet potato is the food that ends famine quickly.
 [The sweet potato is a plant that matures in a few months.]

hoʻolaʻi  (2) 1089Hoʻolaʻi maka ma waho, ʻoʻoleʻa loko.A friendly face outside, a hardness inside.
 [A hypocrite.]
  1090Hoʻolaʻi nā manu i ke aheahe.The birds poise quietly in the gentle breeze.
 [Said of those who are at peace with the world, undisturbed and contented.]

hoʻolakolako  (1) 1543Ka pō nui hoʻolakolako, ke ao nui hoʻohemahema.The great night that provides, the great day that neglects.
 [The gods supply, but man does not always accept with appreciation. Guidance is given in dreams that man often misunderstands and neglects.]

hoʻolalau  (1) 1091Hoʻolalau ka helena i Kualoa, piʻi ana i ka pali o Kānehoalani.In wandering about Kualoa, he ascends the cliff of Kānehoalani.
 [He goes off his course and thereby gets nothing. On the cliff of Kānehoalani stands a phallic stone, a symbol of bad luck when seen in a dream.]

hoʻolale  (4) 1092Hoʻolale a ka ua ʻūkiu.A suggestion of the ʻūkiu rain.
 [Go ahead and do what was suggested. The ʻūkiu rain is cold enough to make one hurry and scurry.]
  1093Hoʻolale i ka ʻai a ka uʻi.Show what youth can do.
 [Let the youth show us what he can do.]
  1690Ke ʻEka, makani hoʻolale waʻa o nā Kona.The ʻEka breeze of Kona that calls to the canoemen to sally forth to fish.
 [Refers to Kona, Hawaiʻi.]
  1806Kioea hoʻolale waʻa.The kioea, who calls the canoes to sally forth [to fish].
 [A Molokaʻi saying.]

hoʻolapa  (1) 1461Ka makani hoʻolapa o Kaumaea.The playful wind of Kaumaea.
 [Kaumaea is in Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi.]

hoʻolaukanaka  (1) 1094Hoʻolaukanaka i ka leo o nā manu.The voices of birds give the place a feeling of being inhabited.
 [Used by those who live, work, or travel in lonely places — life is made happy by the voices of many birds. Common in songs.]

hōʻole  (4) 1095Hōʻole akua, hōʻole mana.Deny the gods, deny their power.
 [Said of an unbeliever who denies the power of the gods.]
  1096Hōʻole ka waha, holehole ʻia nō ka iwi.Though the mouth denies one’s guilt, his bones are stripped anyway.
 [Said of those who deny guilt but are punished anyway. This saying originated in the time of Kamehameha I, when thieves and murderers were severely punished even though they claimed innocence.]
  1700Ke hōʻole mai nei o Hāloa.Hāloa denies that.
 [Hāloa is the god of taro. It was said that whatever business was discussed before an open poi bowl was denied by Hāloa. If a medical kahuna was called while eating, he took it as a sign that he was not the right person to treat the sick one. However, if he was told while eating that someone was dying, he was able to treat the illness, for Hāloa would deny the death.]

hoʻoleʻaleʻa  (1) 2879ʻUnu mai a hoʻonuʻanuʻa ke kilu o Kalamaʻula, hoʻoleʻaleʻa i ke kaha o Kaunalewa.Bring all the kilu for amusement at Kalamaʻula to make merry on the field of Kaunalewa.
 [To come together for a gay time and bring whatever you have to add to the fun. There is a play on lewa, whieh refers to the swinging of the hips in hula.]

hoʻolehelehekiʻi  (1) 1869hoʻolehelehekiʻi i ka mahina ʻai a Nūkeʻe.Standing like a protruding-lip image at the food patch of Nūkeʻe.
 [Standing around doing nothing, gaining nothing; hence, worth nothing. The reference to Nūkeʻe (Twist-mouth) adds a touch of contempt.]

Hoʻolehua  (2) 1935Kuʻu manu lawelawe ō o Hoʻolehua.My bird of Hoʻolehua that cries out about food.
 [Said of the kioea, whose cry sounds like “Lawelawe ke ō! Lawelawe ke ō!" (“Take the food! Take the food!”). The kioea is the bird that calls to the fishermen to set out to sea.]
  2164Moʻa nopu ka lā i ke kula o Hoʻolehua.The sun scorches the plain of Hoʻolehua.
 [Refers to Hoʻolehua, Molokaʻi.]

hoʻolei  (1) 2761Pupuʻu hoʻolei loa, a noho ana!A humping up and a fling, and there he was!
 [Said of one who traveled very swiftly — as though he had flung himself through the air.]

hoʻolele  (2) 701He kohu puahiohio i ka hoʻolele i ka lepo i luna.Like a whirlwind, whirling the dust upward.
 [Said of a commoner who makes an attempt to elevate himself so he will be regarded as a chief.]
  1097Hoʻolele ka uila o Makaweli.Sending the lightning of Makaweli flying.
 [A play on maka-weli (terrifying eyes), this saying refers to the sending of a god on an errand of destruction.]

hoʻolewa  (1) 1181I ka hoʻolewa aku nei o Kuhelemai.Attended the funeral of Kuhelemai.
 [A play on hoʻolewa (to lift) and kū hele mai (stand up and come), meaning that we stood up and lifted the beer down our throats. An expression used by the sweet-potato beer drinkers of Lahaina, Maui.]

hoʻolike  (1) 1098Hoʻolike ka manaʻo i Wailohia.Make your minds alike at Wailohia.
 [Turn your minds onto the same channel with bright thoughts. A play on wai (water) and lohia (sparkle).]

hoʻolohe  (1) 2268Nānā ka maka; hoʻolohe ka pepeiao; paʻa ka waha.Observe with the eyes; listen with the ears; shut the mouth.
 [Thus one learns.]

hoʻolono  (2) 11A hua a pane; a pane ka waha, he hoʻolono ko neʻi.A word in reply; open the mouth and speak, for a listener is here.
 [A command to speak up and tell what one has come for. Used in hoʻopāpā riddling.]
  1263I Waialua ka poʻina a ke kai, ʻo ka leo ka ʻEwa e hoʻolono nei.The dashing of the waves is at Waialua but the sound is being heard at ʻEwa.
 [Sounds of fighting in one locality are quickly heard in another.]

hoʻolua  (1) 593He hoʻolua pikaʻo.Food that has to be recooked.
 [Similar to the expression “half-baked.”]

Hoʻolua  (3) 1099Hoʻolua nui.Big Hoʻolua wind.
 [Said of a person who talks boisterously.]
  1516Ka ō ʻole i ka wehe a ka Hoʻolua.No stopping when the Hoʻolua wind opens up.
 [Said of anything that can’t be stopped.]
  2808Ua laʻi ka makani Hoʻolua.The Hoʻolua gale has calmed.
 [One’s wrath has ceased. Also, the trouble is now passed.]

hoʻoluhi  (1) 551Heʻaumakua hoʻoluhi, hōʻapaʻapa i ke kahuna.An ʻaumakua that does not help is a burden to the kahuna.

hoʻolulu  (1) 1168I hoʻolulu, hoʻohulei ʻia e ka makani.There was a lull, and then the wind began to blow about.
 [There was a promise of peace and quiet, and then the disturbance was renewed.]

hoʻomaʻemaʻe  (1) 683He kēhau hoʻomaʻemaʻe ke aloha.Love is like cleansing dew.
 [Love removes hurt.]

hoʻomaha  (1) 1100Hoʻomaha ʻole ke kai a Mokupaoa.The sea of Mokupaoa never rests.
 [Said of anything or anyone who goes on and on without resting. Mokupaoa is a place name.]

hoʻomakamaka  (1) 2051Mai hoʻomakamaka wahine, he hūpē ka loaʻa.Do not make friends of a woman lest you blow your nose with weeping.
 [Advice to a bride. Be too friendly with another woman and she may hecome too friendly with your husband.]

hoʻomakua  (3) 347E mālama i ka mākua, o hoʻomakua auaneʻi i ka haʻi.Take care of [your] parents lest [the day come when] you will be caring for someone else’s.
 [Mākua includes all relatives of the parents’ generation, including their siblings and cousins.]
  454Hana ʻino i ka ke kino ʻelemakule a hoʻomakua aku i ka haʻi.Mistreat your own oldsters and the day may come when youll be caringfor someone else’s.
 [Said to a rude or ungrateful child. You should think of your own elder first, while he is alive, lest after his death you must take care of someone who had no part in rearing you.]
  2790Ua hoʻomakua ka lāʻau.The plant has become a tree.
 [Said of a habit that might once have been easily overcome but has now gained a good stronghold.]

hoʻomalu  (1) 2816Ua lilo i kai kuewa nā kai kapu i hoʻomalu ʻia.The protected sea [shores] have become sea [shores] for wanderers.
 [Cherished daughters have been led astray.]

hoʻomanaʻo  (1) 292E hoʻomanaʻo i ka lua o ka ʻōhiki.Remember the hole dug by the sand crab.
 [A vulgar expression. A woman may be petite but she can be sexually “deep.”]

hoʻomanawanui  (1) 353E moni i ke koko o ka inaina, ʻumi ka hanu o ka hoʻomanawanui.Swallow the blood of wrath and hold the breath of patience.

hoʻomano  (1) 800He manō ka iʻa hoʻomano ke aloha.Shark is the fish; may love be persistent.
 [An expression used in hana aloha sorcery. A play on manō and hoʻomano (persistent).]

hoʻomaoe  (1) 690He keu a ka hoʻomaoe!Such hinting!
 [Said to a person who hinted his liking for another’s possessions; one was obliged to say, “Take it, I give it to you.” Such a hinting person was disliked, and favorite possessions were hidden away when he approached.]

hoʻomau  (1) 1101Hoʻomau ʻia aku, wahi a ka nūpepa.To be continued, according to the newspaper.
 [Many Hawaiian newspaper articles were continued from week to week. This was said of anything put off to be finished later.]

hoʻomāuna  (1) 2052Mai hoʻomāuna i ka ʻai o huli mai auaneʻi o Hāloa e nānā.Do not be wasteful of food lest Hāloa turn around and stare [at you].
 [Do not be wasteful, especially of poi, because it would anger Hāloa, the taro god, who would someday let the waster go hungry.]

hoʻomoe  (1) 1102Hoʻomoe wai kahi ke kāoʻo.Let all travel together like water flowing in one direction.

hoʻonā  (1) 1103Hoʻonā ke ola i ka hale o ke akua.The distresses of life are relieved in the house of the god.
 [The gods help man.]

hoʻoneʻeneʻe  (1) 2135Mānā, i ka puʻe kalo hoʻoneʻeneʻe a ka wai.Mānā, where the mounded taro moves in the water.
 [Refers to Mānā, Kauaʻi. In ancient days there were five patches at Kolo, Mānā, in which deep water mound-planting was done for taro. As the plants grew, the rootlets were allowed to spread undisturbed because they helped to hold the soil together. When the rainy season came, the whole area was flooded as far as Kalamaihiki, and it took weeks for the water to subside. The farmers built rafts of sticks and rushes, then dived into the water. They worked the bases of the taro mounds free and lifted them carefully, so as not to disturb the soil, to the rafts where they were secured. The weight of the mounds submerged the rafts but permitted the taro stalks to grow above water just as they did before the flood came. The rafts were tied together to form a large, floating field of taro.]

hoʻoni  (1) 2053Mai hoʻoni i ka wai lana mālie.Do not disturb the water that is tranquil.
 [Let the peaceful enjoy their peace.]

hoʻonohonoho  (1) 1104Hoʻonohonoho i Waineki kauhale o Limaloa.Set in order at Waineki are the houses of Limaloa.
 [Limaloa, the god of mirages, made houses appear and disappear on the plains of Mānā. This saying applies to the development of ideas, the setting of plans, or the arranging of things in order.]

hoʻonuʻa  (1) 1105Hoʻonuʻa Hilo i ka lehua.Hilo produces the lehua in abundance.

hoʻonuʻanuʻa  (1) 2879ʻUnu mai a hoʻonuʻanuʻa ke kilu o Kalamaʻula, hoʻoleʻaleʻa i ke kaha o Kaunalewa.Bring all the kilu for amusement at Kalamaʻula to make merry on the field of Kaunalewa.
 [To come together for a gay time and bring whatever you have to add to the fun. There is a play on lewa, whieh refers to the swinging of the hips in hula.]

hoʻonui  (1) 2659Pipī ka wahie, hoʻonui ka pulupulu.If the firewood burns slowly, add more tinder.
 [Keep trying until you succeed.]

hoʻonuinui  (1) 1080Hoʻokahi no makani ʻino o ke Kalakalaʻihi Kalaloa, he hoʻonuinui ʻōlelo.There is only one bad wind, the Kalakalaʻihi Kalaloa, which creates too much talk.
 [Said of nasty words that start dissension and argument. A play on kalakala (rough) and kala loa (very rough). First uttered by the lizard-goddess Kilioe, who was trying to stir Pele to wrath by her insults.]

hoʻonuʻu  (1) 1106Hoʻonuʻu ihola a kū kahauli.Ate with eagerness until he stood up with excitement.
 [Said of a person who tries to please by eagerly heeding everyone’s advice and commands, and by so doing receives approval and advancement.]

hoʻopā  (1) 1339Ka iʻa hoʻopā ʻili kanaka o Waimea.The fish of Waimea that touch the skins of people.
 [When it was the season for hinana, the spawn of ʻoʻopu, at Waimea, Kauaʻi, they were so numerous that one couldn’t go into the water without rubbing against them.]

hoʻopaʻa  (3) 286E hoʻi ka waʻa; mai hoʻopaʻa aku i ka ʻino.Make the canoe go back; do not insist on heading into a storm.
 [A plea not to do something or associate with someone that will lead to serious trouble.]
  377E puʻu auaneʻi ka lae i ka ua o Kawaupuʻu, i ka hoʻopaʻa a ka hōʻakamai.The forehead is likely to be lumped by the rain of Kawaupuu if one insists on being a smarty.
 [A warning not to get cocky or smart lest one be hurt. A play on puʻu (lump).]
  1225I leʻa ka hula i ka hoʻopaʻa.The hula is pleasing because of the drummer.
 [The lesser details that one pays little attention to are just as important as the major ones. Although the attention is given to the dancer, the drummer and chanter play an important role in the dance.]

hoʻopala  (1) 1554Ka ua hoʻopala ʻōhiʻa.The rain that ripens mountain apples.
 [The rain that comes just as the mountain apple is beginning to ripen.]

hoʻopāpā  (1) 1107Hoʻopāpā i Waipā ka Lūpua.The Lūpua wind touches at Waipā.
 [Said of one who cannot refrain from touching or pawing. Waipā is the name of a wind and location on Kauaʻi]

hoʻopau  (3) 1108Hoʻopau kaʻā, he lawaiʻa paoa; hoʻānuānu ʻili o ka hele maunu.An unlucky fisherman wastes time in wetting his line; he merely gets his skin cold in seeking bait.
 [Said of an unlucky person who, in spite of every effort, gets nothing.]
  1109Hoʻopau maunu i ka iʻa liʻiliʻi; e kiʻi nō ma ka iʻa nunui.A waste of bait to go for the small fish; go for the big ones.
  1863Kuehu ka ʻai hoʻopau a ka ua.Shaken up are the products over which the rain did its best to produce.
 [Said of good crops as a result of showers.]

Hoʻopaupaualio  (1) 2389ʻO Ikiiki ke kāne, ʻo Hoʻopaupaualio ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he keiki huhū koke.Ikiiki is the husband, Hoʻopaupauaho (Cause-shortness-of-breath) is the wife; a child born to them is short of temper.
 [Said of a child born in the month of Ikiiki.]

hoʻopiha  (3) 293E hoʻopiha i ka lua o ka inaina.Fill the pit of wrath.
 [Fill the stomach.]
  294E hoʻopiha i ka mākālua i hakahaka.Fill the hole from which the plant has been removed.
 [Find someone to replace one who has gone away or died.]
  897He poʻe hoʻopiha waʻa.Canoe fillers.
 [A derogatory remark pertaining to useless people who do nothing to help, like riders in a canoe who wield no paddle, no fishnet, and no pole.]

hoʻopiʻipiʻi  (1) 1110Hoʻopiʻipiʻi kai.Causing the sea to rise.
 [Said of one who stirs up wrath.]

hoʻopilikia  (1) 280E hele ka ʻelemakule, ka luahine, a me nā kamaliʻi a moe i ke ala ʻaʻohe mea nāna e hoʻopilikia.Let the old men, the old women, and the children go and sleep on the wayside; let them not be molested.
 [Said by Kamehameha I.]

hoʻopio  (1) 1111Hoʻopio ʻia e ka noho aliʻi a ka ua.Made prisoner by the reign of the rain.
 [When the rainy season comes, one is kept indoors.]

hoʻopoponi  (1) 2626Pēpē i ka ua hoʻopoponi ʻili.Bruised by the rain that bruises the skin.
 [Said of one whose feelings are hurt.]

hoʻopuhili  (1) 189ʻAʻohe mea nāna e hoʻopuhili, he moho no ka lā makani.There is no one to interfere, for he is a messenger of a windy day.
 [Said in admiration of a person who lets nothing stop him from carrying out the task entrusted to him.]

hoʻopuka  (2) 2127Ma loko o ka hale, hoʻopuka ʻia ka pili, a ma waho o ka hale, he haku ia.Inside of the house you may mention your relationship, but outside of the house your chief is your lord.
 [Those who served the chief in his home were usually loyal blood relatives. From childhood they were taught not to discuss the relationship with anyone outside of the household, and always to refer to their chief as Kuu haku (My lord), never by any relationship term. Only the chief could mention a relationship if he chose.]
  2464ʻO ke kumu, o ka māna, hoʻopuka ʻia.The teacher, the pupil — let it come forth.
 [A challenge from a pupil to the teacher who trained him in warfare or sports — “Now let the teacher and pupil vie against each other.”]

hoʻopumehana  (1) 1340Ka iʻa hoʻopumehana i ka weuweu.The fish that warms the clumps of grass.
 [Mountain shrimp, which cling to weeds and grasses along the banks of streams when a cloudburst occurs in the upland. Unlike the ʻoʻopu, they are not washed down to the lowland.]

hoʻopunipuni  (1) 218Aʻo i ka hoʻopunipuni, aʻo aku nō i ka ʻaihue.Learn to lie and the next thing will be to steal.

hoʻouai  (1) 2290Nā puʻe ʻuala hoʻouai.Movable mounds of sweet potato.
 [It was the custom of Pūlaʻa, Puna, Hawaiʻi, to remove the best mounds of sweet potato, earth and all, to wide strips of thick, coarse lauhala mats stretched out on racks. When a chief came on a visit, these mats were placed on the right-hand side of the road and made kapu. Should he return, the mat-grown potato field was carried to the opposite side of the road so that it would still be on the right of the traveling chief.]

hoʻoūlu  (1) 1159I hewa i ka lele mua, i ka hoʻoūlu i ka lā ʻino.The fault lies in leaping first, in inspiring a bad day.
 [Said of a person who starts a fight or an argument, especially after he has been worsted.]

hoʻoūnauna  (1) 453Hānai kanaka, hiki ke hoʻoūnauna.Feed humans and one can send them on errands.
 [Said to people who adopt or take in children to raise. Children can be helpful.]

hoʻowali  (1) 2447ʻO ka wai kau nō ia o Keʻanae; ʻo ka ʻūlei hoʻowali ʻuala ia o Kula.It is the pool on the height of Keanae; it is the ʻūlei digging stick for the potato [patch] of Kula.
 [A handsome young man of Kula and a beautiful young woman of Keʻanae, on Maui, were attracted to each other. She boasted of her own womanly perfection by referring to her body as the pool on the heights of Keʻanae. Not to be outdone, he looked down at himself and boasted of his manhood as the digging stick of Kula.]

hope  (9) 181ʻAʻohe ma mua, ʻaʻohe ma hope, ʻaʻohe i ka ʻākau, ʻaʻohe i ka hema.Nothing before, nothing behind, nothing at the right, nothing at the left.
 [Utter, absolute poverty.]
  489Hāʻule i ka hope waʻa.Left in the aft of the canoe.
 [Said of one who comes last or is tardy.]
  773He lono ma mua, he kulina ma hope; kulikuli wale ka makani o Kaʻū!Report went first, heedlessness followed; what a din the wind of Kaʻū raised!
 [From a chant for Kaumualiʻi of Kauaʻi.]
  1873Kū i ka hāiki, ʻaʻole ma mua, ʻaʻole ma hope.Stands in a narrnow space until nothing before and nothing behind.
 [Said of one who has nothing to fall back on and no one to help.]
  2265Nāna i waele mua i ke ala, ma hope aku mākou, nā pōkiʻi.He [or she] first cleared the path and then we younger ones followed.
 [Said with affection and respect for the oldest sibling (hiapo).]
  2436ʻO ka poʻe hulilau ʻole o hope.Those with no large gourd calabashes in the back.
 [Those with no wives at home.]

more hope
2459ʻO ke kahua ma mua, ma hope ke kūkulu.The site first, and then the building.
 [Learn all you can, then practice.]

hopo  (1) 1112Hopo ana i ka wai poniponi o Waipuhi.Fearful of the dark water of Waipuhi.
 [Said of one who is fearful of getting into trouble.]

Hōpoe  (5) 474Haoʻe nā ʻale o Hōpoe i ka ʻino.The billows of Hōpoe rise in the storm.
 [His anger is mounting. Hōpoe, Puna, has notoriously high seas.]
  738He lehua neneʻe wale i Hōpoe.A low spreading lehua tree at Hōpoe.
 [A petite person, as pretty as a small, flower-laden tree.]
  1113Hōpoe, ka wahine lewa i ke kai.Hōpoe, the woman who dances in the sea.
 [Hōpoe was a dancer of Keaʻau, Puna, in that long ago day when gods mingled with men. Because of her dancing and her kindly nature, Hōpoe was taken by the goddess Hiʻiaka as a favorite friend. When Pele sent Hiʻiaka to Kauaʻi to fetch Lohiʻau, the first request Hiʻiaka made to Pele was to be kind to her friend, Hōpoe. After a time, when Hiʻiaka did not return as expected, Pele in a fit of rage destroyed Hiʻiaka’s grove and the beloved Hōpoe. The latter was changed into a balancing stone that seemed to dance in the sea.]
  1567Ka ua kiawe lehua o Hōpoe.The rain that sets the lehua of Hōpoe to swaying.
 [When the rain patters down, the lehua of Hōpoe, Puna, gently sway to and fro.]
  2534ʻOpihi kauwawe lehua o Hōpoe.ʻOpihi covered by the lehua blossoms of Hōpoe.
 [The fringes of lehua at Hōpoe fall into the sea, and are washed up over the rocks, hiding the ʻopihi.]

hopu  (6) 613He iʻa no ka pāpaʻu, he loaʻa wale i ka hopu lima; he iʻa no ka hohonu, noho i kaʻeaʻea.Fish of the shallows are easy to catch with the hands; but fish of the depths keep the fisherman wet with sea sprays.
 [Ordinary folks are easy to find but an outstanding one is not.]
  1114Hopu hewa i ka ʻāhui hala o Kekele.[One] grasps the pandanus cluster of Kekele by mistake.
 [Said of one who meets with disappointment. A play on hala (to miss or to be gone). The hala cluster is often used figuratively to refer to the scrotum. Kekele is a grove at the base of Nuʻuanu Pali.]
  1115Hopu hewa i ka loli, i ka iʻa maka ʻole.Grasped the eyeless fish by mistake.
 [Met with disappointment. The loli (sea cucumber) is known as the fish without eyes.]
  1242I noho ʻoukou a i pae mai he waʻa o Kahiki-makolena, hopu ʻoukou a paʻa; o ke kahuna ia ʻaʻohe e ʻeha ka ʻili ʻoiai no Kahiki aku ana ka ʻāina.If sometime in the future a canoe from Kahiki-makolena arrives, grasp and hold fast to it. There is the kahuna for you, and your skins will never more he hurt [in war],for the land will someday he owned hy Kahiki.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kaleikuahulu to Kaʻahumanu and her sisters as he was dying. Foreign priests (missionaries) will come. Accept their teachings.]
  2054Mai hopu mai ʻoe, he manu kapu; ua kapu na ka nahele o ʻOʻokuauli.Do not catch it, for it is a bird reserved; reserved for the forest of ʻOʻokuauli.
 [Do not try to win one who is reserved for another.]
  2791Ua hopu hewa i ka uouoa.Accidentally caught an uouoa fish.
 [A play on uō (to howl). Said of one who has gotten himself into something distressing.]

hou  (16) 152ʻAʻohe i nalo ka ʻulaʻula o ka lepo, loaʻa hou nō ka wahine.The redness of the earth hasnt even vanished when a new wife is obtained.
 [Said in scorn of a person who takes a new mate shortly after the death of the old one.]
  157ʻAʻohe kahe o ka hou i ka ʻōʻō kōhi paʻōʻō a kamaliʻi.With the digging implement used by children to dig up leftover potatoes, no perspiration is shed.
 [Said of a task requiring little elfort.]
  594He hou moe kāheka.A hou fish that sleeps in a sea pool.
 [Said of a person who snores. The hou when sleeping makes a snoring sound.]
  595He hou ʻoe, he iʻa moe ahiahi.You are a hou, a fish that sleeps in the evening.
 [A small, inoffensive fellow — but one who will fight when annoyed.]
  723He lau maiʻa pala ka wahine, hou aku nō ʻoe, pōhae.A woman is like a yellowed banana leaf that tears when one pokes at it.
 [A woman does not have the strength of a man.]
  737He leho hou kēia, ke ola nei nō ka ʻiʻo.This is a fresh cowry; the flesh is still alive.
 [A warning that a new idea or plan may turn out badly. When the animal in a shell dies, a stench results.]

more hou
1024Hoʻi hou i ka iwi kuamoʻo.Return to the backbone.
 [To return to the homeland or family after being away.]

houpo  (5) 79ʻĀina i ka houpo o Kāne.Land on the bosom of Kāne.
 [Puna, Hawaiʻi. It is said that before Pele migrated there from Kahiki, no place in the islands was more beautiful than Puna.]
  375E pū paʻakai aku a paʻa ka houpo.Take a bit of salt till the diaphragm is solid.
 [Said by one whose fare is humble, consisting mostly of poi with salt or kukui relish. “Eat till you are satisfied of this humble fare.”]
  951He ukana ko ka houpo.A burden on ihe diaphragm.
 [A problem in the mind.]
  2839Ua paʻa ka houpo.The diaphragm is made firm.
 [Hunger is gone and the stomach is filled.]
  2877ʻUmi ka hanu i ka houpo.Hold back the breath in the chest.
 [Bear with utmost patience.]

  (8) 1119 akula i kula.Lost on the plain.
 [Said of one who goes off-course.]
  1124 hewa ʻia paha ke Kinaʻu, a ke Kalaukina e huli hele nei.Perhaps the Kinaʻu is off her course, to have the Claudine go in search of her.
 [Said in fun of a person who goes in search of another. This is a line from a hula song.]
  1125 hewa i Kapua ka ʻauwaʻa pānānā ʻole.The fleet of canoes without a compass landed at Kapua by mistake.
 [Said of one who is off his course, mentally or otherwise. A saying from Kohala.]
  1131 i kula ka make o ka ʻaiā.The wicked dead is washed up by the sea.
 [In ancient times, certain priests would take charge of a chief’s corpse. The flesh and viscera, called pela, were sometimes taken out to sea where they were deposited. It was said that the viscera of a good chief was accepted by the sea and hidden in its depth, but that of a wicked chief was washed ashore and left there.]
  1132 ka ʻalaʻala.The aerial bulbs appeared.
 [A lot of nothing worth troubling about. Here, ʻalaʻala refers to the aerial bulbs on the hoi vine. ʻAlaʻala is also the term applied to the liver of the octopus in songs and sayings, regarded as a symbol for something unimportant.]
  1133 ka makani.The wind blows a gale.
 [Said of great speed. There is a hū (hum) and one is gone like the wind.]

more
1134 ka wai i ke pili.The water overflows to the pili grass.
 [Said of anything that overflows its boundaries, including a person whose behavior goes beyond the bounds of propriety.]

hua  (13) 11A hua a pane; a pane ka waha, he hoʻolono ko neʻi.A word in reply; open the mouth and speak, for a listener is here.
 [A command to speak up and tell what one has come for. Used in hoʻopāpā riddling.]
  143ʻAʻohe hua o ka maiʻa i ka lā hoʻokahi.Bananas do not fruit in a single day.
 [A retort to an impatient person.]
  144ʻAʻohe hua waiho i Kahiki.Not even the eggs should be left in Kahiki.
 [Used when inviting all to come — even the little children are welcome. Also, bring everything and leave nothing.]
  779He maiʻa ke kanaka a ka lā e hua ai.A man is like a banana tree on the day it bears its fruit.
 [When a man’s body was removed from a grave, a banana stalk was laid in to take its place.]
  1073Hoʻokahi no hua a ka ʻaʻo.The ʻaʻo bird lays but a single egg.
 [Said of the mother of an only child.]
  1118Hua kanawao ka liko o ke kapu.Kanawao seeds produce sacred leaf buds.
 [The seeds of the kanawao, a small tree, were believed to help in making a woman fertile. In royal chants, large families of chiefs were sometimes compared to kanawao trees and their seeds.]

more hua
1161ʻIhi ka kua, meha ka alo; ka hua i ka umauma hōʻike ʻia.Sacred is the back, silent the front; the word on the chest, reveal.
 [An expression often used by chiefs. No one stands behind and no one else is here in my presence, so deliver your message to me.]

hua kahi  (1) 596He hua kahi.A single seed.
 [An only child.]

huʻa kai  (1) 2864ʻŪlili alualu huʻa kai.Wandering tattler that chases after sea foam.
 [Said of a person who runs here and there for trivial things.]

hua moa  (1) 2410ʻO ka ʻīlio i paoa ka waha i ka hua moa ʻaʻole e pau ia hana iā ia.A dog whose mouth likes the taste of eggs will not stop taking them.
 [Said of one who cannot be cured of a bad habit.]

Huaʻā  (1) 857He ʻoi wale aku nō ʻo Huaʻā.Great indeed was Huaʻā.
 [A sarcasm. Huaʻā was a chief of Puna on Hawaiʻi. When the chief of another district threatened to war against him, he hastily sent word to Kamehameha for protection. The latter ordered the war-minded chief to cease his threats.]

huʻahuʻa  (1) 2608Pau ka wai o ia pūnāwai, ke piʻi maila ka huʻahuʻa lepo.The water is gone from that spring, for only muddy foam arises.
 [Said of a mudslinger. First uttered by the Reverend George B. Rowell on Kauaʻi.]

huahuaʻi  (1) 1652Ka wai huahuaʻi o Kewalo.The bubbling water of Kewalo.
 [Kewalo once had a large spring where many went for cool, refreshing water.]

huaʻi  (2) 1117Huaʻi ka ʻulu o Lele i ka makani Kona.The breadfruit of Lele is exposed by the Kona wind.
 [Hidden matters are exposed in time of anger. When the Kona wind blows, the leaves of the trees are blown off to expose the fruit.]
  1765Ke lepo ke kumu wai, e huaʻi ana ka lepo i kai.When the source of the water is dirty, muddy water will he seen in the lowland.
 [When the thoughts are dirty, dirty words are heard.]

huakaʻi  (3) 597He huakaʻi paoa, he pili i ka iwi.An unlucky journey in which the body was wagered.
 [Suffering.]
  1143Hulili ka lā i ke kula o Makahuʻena, he huakaʻi ʻoiʻo.When the sunlight vibrates over the plain of Makahuena, a procession of ghosts is going through.
 [A saying used when the heat of the sun appears to vibrate. The huakaʻi ʻoiʻo is a procession of departed chiefs and their followers.]
  2408ʻŌkaʻi ka ʻeʻa, ʻōkaʻi huakaʻi ʻula.A moving cloud of dust; a reddish procession.
 [A great cloud of dust moving along warns of the advance of warriors.]

Huanu  (1) 307Eia ʻo Kuʻiʻaki me Huanu ke hana nei i ka lāua hana o ka ʻohi ʻiʻo pūpū.Here are Kuʻiʻaki and Huanu doing their work gathering shellfish.
 [An intense cold. A play on Kuʻi-ʻaki (Gritting-the-molars) and Hu-anu (Overflowing-cold). Huanu is Hawaiian for Juan.]

huaʻole  (1) 2376ʻO huaʻole ka lā, ʻo nakaka ka lā, ʻo ʻōmilu ka lā, ʻo pōnalo ka lā.Fruitless is the day, cracked is the day, puny is the day, blighted is the day.
 [Said of a day that brings no luck to the worker.]

hue  (1) 2827Ua maloʻo ka pua hue.The gourd blossom has withered.
 [Said of a person withered with age.]

huʻe  (2) 298E huʻe mai ʻoe i ke koaiʻe o Makawao!Try uprooting the koaiʻe tree of Makawao!
 [I defy you to tackle a lad of Makawao! A boast from a native of Makawao, Maui.]
  1121Huʻe a kaua, moe i ke awakea.A battle attack, then sleep at midday.
 [The sleep of death. When Kawelo fought Kauahoa, the latter uttered this, meaning that he would fight back until his opponent was dead.]

hue wai  (1) 1506Ka nui e paʻa ai i ka hue wai.The size that enables one to carry a water bottle.
 [Said of a child about two years old. In Kaʻū, where fresh water was scarce and had to be obtained from upland springs, every person who went helped to carry home water. When a child was about two, he was given a small gourd bottle for carrying water.]

huʻea  (2) 1120Huʻea i kai nā pihaʻā moe wai o uka.Washed down to the sea are the stones and debris of the upland stream beds.
 [Said of a cloudburst that washes the stones from the stream beds, or of a person who, like the torrents, leaves no scandal untold.]
  1122Huʻea pau ʻia e ka wai.All scooped up by rushing water.
 [Everything is told, no secrets are kept.]

Huʻehuʻewai  (1) 1475Ka malu niu o Huʻehuʻewai.The coconut grove of Huʻehuʻewai.
 [This grove was in Kaimū, Puna.]

huelo  (5) 954He ula, ke paneʻe ala ka huelo.It is a lobster, for it flips its tail.
 [Said of a person who is always moving about.]
  1596Ka ua peʻe pū hala o Huelo.The rain of Huelo that makes one hide in a hala grove.
  2187Moku ka huelo o Kalahumoku lā!Bitten off was the tail of Kalahumoku!
 [Said when one starts a fight and then gets beaten. Kalahumoku was a supernatural dog from Kahiki who became the friend of ʻAiwohikupua, chief of Kauaʻi. He was taken by the latter to Hawaiʻi to fight the lizard guardian of Paliuli and to destroy ʻAiwohikupua’s sisters, who resided there. The girls had been deserted by the chief when they did not win for him the woman he wanted to wed. The lizard won the battle and the dog returned to his friend with his ears chewed up and part of his tail bitten off.]
  2236Nā keiki huelo loloa o ka ʻĀina Pua.The long-tailed sons of the Flowery Kingdom.
 [The Chinese, who once wore queues.]
  2935Welo ka huelo kū.The standing tails sway.
 [Said of young vines that appear in the month of Welo and have not yet spread. Owls sometimes mistake them for rats and pounce on them.]

huewai  (6) 598He huewai ola ke kanaka na Kāne.Man is Kāne’s living water gourd.
 [Water is life and Kāne is the keeper of water. To dream of a well-filled water gourd that breaks and spills its contents is a warning of death for someone in the family.]
  1123Huewai maka.Unripe water gourd.
 [A small water hole, which is nearly too small to be of value. Not applied to people.]
  1247I ʻolāʻolā nō ka huewai i ka piha ʻole.The water gourd gurgles when not filled full.
 [A person not very well informed talks more than one who is.]
  1253I pao i ka huewai nuku pueo a ke kanaka.Pecked at the man’s short-necked gourd bottle.
 [Attempted an affair with another’s wife. This saying comes from the story of the ʻelepaio bird that pecked at a man’s water bottle while he slept.]
  2208Nahā ka huewai a ua kahe ka wai.The gourd water-bottle is broken and the water has run out.
 [The body is dead; life has fled.]
  2374ʻO Honoliʻi, huewai ʻolāʻolā i ka nuku.Honoliʻi, where the water bottle gurgles at the mouth.
 [Said of those of Honoliʻi, Hilo, by Hiʻiaka. In ancient days, expert sorcerers there who prayed others to death muttered prayers that sounded like the gurgling of a water bottle.]

huhiā  (2) 113Aloha mai nō, aloha aku; ʻo ka huhiā ka mea e ola ʻole ai.When love is given, love should he returned; anger is the thing that gives no life.
  2406ʻO ka huhiā ʻino ka mea e ola ʻole ai.Rage is a thing that does not produce life.

huhū  (4) 739Hele huhū ke ahi me ka momoku.Angrily goes the fire and the firebrand.
 [Said of lightning and thunder.]
  1187I kani koʻaka i ka leʻaleʻa; i puʻu ko nuku i ka huhū; i leʻa ka nohona i ka māʻona.One laughs when joyous; sulks when angry; [is] at peace with all when the stomach is satisfed with food.
  1899Kū ke ʻehu o ka huhū o ka mea hale, nakeke ka ʻauwae i ka inaina.The anger of the house owner rises like the [sea] spray, and the chin rattles with wrath.
 [Said of an angry host. First uttered by Lohiʻau when he arrived at Kīlauea and encountered the wrath of Pele.]
  2389ʻO Ikiiki ke kāne, ʻo Hoʻopaupaualio ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he keiki huhū koke.Ikiiki is the husband, Hoʻopaupauaho (Cause-shortness-of-breath) is the wife; a child born to them is short of temper.
 [Said of a child born in the month of Ikiiki.]

huhui  (1) 1126Huhui nā ʻōpua i Awalau.The clouds met at Pearl Harbor.
 [Said of the mating of two people.]

huhuki  (1) 148ʻAʻohe ʻike wale iho iā Maliʻo, i ka huhuki laweau a Uwēkahuna.Malio is not recognized because Uwēkahuna is drawing her away.
 [Said of one who refuses to recognize old friends and associates or is snubbed by friends because they have interests elsewhere. Maliʻo was a mythical woman of Puna whom Pele once snubbed. Uwēkahuna is the bluff overlooking the crater of Kīlauea.]

Huhune  (1) 2550ʻO Welehu ke kāne, ʻo Huhune ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he luluāʻina.Welehu is the husband, Huhune (Tiny-specks) the wife; a child born to them is freckled.
 [Said of a child born in the month of Welehu.]

hui  (6) 282E hiolo ana nā kapu kahiko; e hina ana nā heiau me nā lele; e hui ana nā moku; he iho mai ana ka lani a e piʻi ana ka honua.The ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars willfall; the islands will be united; the heavens will descend and the earth ascend.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time. The last part of the saying means that chiefs will come down to humble positions and commoners rise to positions of honor.]
  1127Hui aku, hui mai, hui kalo me ka nāwao.Mixed there, mixed here, all mixed together are the cultivated and the wild taros.
 [Said of a great mix-up.]
  1128Hui aku na maka i Kou.The faces will meet in Kou.
 [We will all meet there. Kou (now central Honolulu) was the place where the chiefs played games, and people came from everywhere to watch.]
  2823Ua loha nā hui o Hāʻupu.The flippers of Hāʻupu droop.
 [Said poetically of an aged person. The ridges on both sides of Hā’upu hill on Kaua’i go down gradually, with a rise here and there, but none is as high as Hā’upu itself.]

huihui  (2) 362E noho ma lalo o ka lāʻau maka, iho mai ka huihui, māʻona ka ʻōpū.Sit under a green tree. When the cluster comes down, the stomach is filled.
 [Serve a worthy person. When your reward comes you will never be hungry.]
  1129Huihui pāipu a Lono.Lono’s cluster of gourd vessels.
 [Lono was a woman who had a large family of children and an indolent, pleasure-seeking husband. Hers was a life of drudgery. Tired of it, she sought a home on the sun. But when she tried to go up to it, she grew so uncomfortably warm that she came down again. Then she tried to go to a star, but the twinkling of the stars made her feel that they were laughing at her plight. Then, when the full moon rose, she changed her children into gourds and traveled up a rainbow toward the moon. Her husband saw her and ran to grasp her ankle as she went up. Her foot slipped off like a lizard’s tail. So Lono entered the moon and remained there. On full-moon nights, the people would point out the shadows in the moon and say, “There is Lono and her gourds.” Today a mother who goes about with her flock of children is compared to Lono and her gourds.]

huikau  (4) 633He imu pale ʻole; huikau ka nohona.An uncovered oven; abiding in confusion.
 [Like an imu in which each kind of food is not set apart in its own place, but piled in helter skelter, so is a promiscuous and careless family.]
  842He nohona huikau, noho aku a noho mai.A life of confusion, living this way and that.
 [Referring to promiscuous people who share each other’s mates.]
  1130Huikau nā makau a ka lawaiʻa i Wailua, lou mai ʻo Kawelowai iā Waiehu.The fishhooks of the fishers became entangled at Wailua and caught Kawelowai at Waiehu.
 [An entangling love affair. The first line of a chant.]
  2321No Hilina paha, ke huikau ala ka ʻōlelo.Perhaps he was born in Hilina — his speech is confused.
 [A play on hili (confusion). Hilina is the month of winds.]

huki  (3) 38Aia i ka huki nehu, ka iʻa kaulana o ka ʻāina.Gone to haul in the nehu, the well-known fish of the land.
 [Gone to get nehu for bait. Gone to get her man; that is, gone to get the bait that will get him.]
  39Aia i ka huki ulua.Gone to haul ulua fish.
 [Gone to get her man. The ulua fish signifies a man.]
  1135Huki kū i luna ka lae o Kalaʻau.The point of Kalaʻau holds itself high.
 [Said of an uncooperative person who wants his own way or of an egotistic, self-centered person. A Molokaʻi expression.]

hula  (4) 2ʻAʻa i ka hula, waiho ka hilahila i ka hale.When one wants to dance the hula, bashfulness should be left at home.
 [Also expressed Aʻo i ka hula,....]
  1225I leʻa ka hula i ka hoʻopaʻa.The hula is pleasing because of the drummer.
 [The lesser details that one pays little attention to are just as important as the major ones. Although the attention is given to the dancer, the drummer and chanter play an important role in the dance.]
  2571Paʻi ana nā pahu a hula leʻa; ʻo kaʻu hula nō kēia.Let the better-enjoyed hula chanters beat their own drums; this is the hula chant that I know.
 [A retort: Let those who claim to know a lot produce their knowledge; this is what I know.]

hulali  (1) 837He nani hulali ka hao.A beauty like the shine of steel.
 [Not applied to persons. From the chorus of a song of the 1800s.]

huleilua  (1) 1136Huleilua i nā nalu o Launiupoko.The waves of Launiupoko toss this way and that.
 [Said of one who is unsure of himself. From Maui.]

huli  (11) 316E kanu i ka huli ʻoi hāʻule ka ua.Plant the taro stalks while there is rain.
 [Do your work when opportunity affords.]
  1137Huli ka lau o ka ʻamaʻu i uka, nui ka wai o kahawai.When the leaves of the ʻamaʻu turn toward the upland, it is a sign of a flood.
 [When the wind blows the leaves of the ʻamau fern so that they bend toward the mountains it is also blowing clouds inland, which will produce rain.]
  1138Huli ka malau, ka ʻiako a ka lawaiʻa.The malau that serves as an outrigger of the canoe is turned over.
 [Work is done. The malau is a live-bait carrier attached to the canoe. When the fishing was done the empty malau was tumed over. First used by Hiʻiaka in a chant when she saw two shark men flee at the sight of her, though she intended no harm.]
  1139Huli ke alo i ka paia.Turn the face to the wall.
 [There is nothing to fear. To go to sleep with one’s face to the wall is an indication of confidence in one’s safety.]
  1140Huli ke alo i luna.Facing upward.
 [Said of a baby not yet able to sit up or a person too sick to rise.]
  1141Huli ke alo i luna, helu i ka ʻaʻaho.Lying face up and counting the rafters.
 [Lazy.]

more huli
1142Huli kua nā ʻale o ka moana.The billows of the ocean turn their backs on each other.
 [Said of friends who are not on speaking terms.]

huli hana  (2) 1481Kamaʻomaʻo, ka ʻāina huli hana.At Kamaʻomaʻo, land of activities.
 [Ghosts who do not go to the pō of their ancestors often wander about in certain areas. Kamaomao, Maui, is such a place. The activities of such ghosts usually annoy the living.]
  1761Ke kula o Kamaʻomaʻo ka ʻāina huli hana.The plain of Kamaʻomaʻo — that is the place where plenty of work is to he found.
 [A taunt to one who talks of looking for work but does not do it. The plain of Kamaʻomaʻo, Maui, was said to be the haunt of ghosts whose activities were often terrifying.]

huli hele  (1) 1124Hū hewa ʻia paha ke Kinaʻu, a ke Kalaukina e huli hele nei.Perhaps the Kinaʻu is off her course, to have the Claudine go in search of her.
 [Said in fun of a person who goes in search of another. This is a line from a hula song.]

huli pū  (1) 1948Lanalana, pā i ke Kona, huli pū.Insecurely rooted, when the Kona winds blow it topples over.
 [When one is insecurely rooted in his knowledge or character, any adversity causes him to fall.]

hulilau  (1) 2436ʻO ka poʻe hulilau ʻole o hope.Those with no large gourd calabashes in the back.
 [Those with no wives at home.]

hulili  (2) 1143Hulili ka lā i ke kula o Makahuʻena, he huakaʻi ʻoiʻo.When the sunlight vibrates over the plain of Makahuena, a procession of ghosts is going through.
 [A saying used when the heat of the sun appears to vibrate. The huakaʻi ʻoiʻo is a procession of departed chiefs and their followers.]
  1144Hulili wela ka lā o Maunaloa.The sun shining on Maunaloa makes it vibrate with heat.
 [Maunaloa, Moloka’i, is a very warm place.]

hulilua  (1) 2155Me he makani hulilua lā, huli ka manaʻo, hele ka noʻonoʻo.Like the wind that blows one way and then blows another, so does the mind turn and the thoughts depart.
 [Said of one who makes a promise and then forgets all about it.]

hulu  (10) 56Aia kēkē nā hulu o ka umauma hoʻi ke kōlea i Kahiki e hānau ai.When the feathers on the breast darken [because of fatness] the plover goes back to Kahiki to breed.
 [A person comes here, grows prosperous, and goes away without a thought to the source of his prosperity.]
  565He hamo hulu puna ma waho.A brushing on the outside with whitewash.
 [A friendly exterior only.]
  803He manu hulu.A feathered bird.
 [A prosperous person.]
  1074Hoʻokahi no hulu like o ia poʻe.Those people are all of the same feather.
  1279Kaʻapā ka manu hulu ʻole.A bird without feathers is helpless.
 [Said of a weakling.]
  2414ʻŌkala ka hulu o Hilo i ka wai.The fur of Hilo bristles in the water.
 [Sexual passion is rising.]

more hulu
2416ʻŌkalakala nā hulu ʻauwae.The hairs on his chin bristle.
 [Said of an angry person who raves and rants.]

hulu aliʻi  (1) 599He hulu aliʻi.Royal feathers.
 [Said of the adornment of a chief, or of an elderly chief himself who is one of a few survivors of his generation and therefore precious.]

hulu makua  (1) 601He hulu makua.A feather parent.
 [When most of the relatives of the parents’ generation were gone, the few left were referred to as hulu mākua and considered as precious and choice as feathers. Hulu can refer to relatives as far back as three generations.]

huluhulu  (3) 156ʻAʻohe kā he lohe o ko pepeiao huluhulu?Don’t your hairy ears hear?
 [Said in annoyance or disgust for disobedience or heedlessness. The ears are too full of fuzz to let sounds enter.]
  600He huluhulu kau i ka puka ihu.Hair growing inside of the nostril.
 [Said in envy of a person who is regarded as a favorite by a superior — he is so closely allied to the person that he is likened to a hair in the other’s nostril. Also said in criticism of one who is made too much of.]
  1206ʻIke ʻia aʻe nō ma ka huluhulu kau i ka puka ihu.Attention is paid only to the hairs of the nostrils.
 [Attention is paid to the favored few whom one does not like to offend.]

hului  (2) 657He kai hului ko Kālia.A sea for fishing with a draw net is the sea of Kālia.
 [The water at Kālia is very shallow.]
  1145Hului kōkō a Makaliʻi a kau i luna.The carrying net of Makaliʻi takes all and suspends them on high.
 [Said of a stingy person. Makaliʻi was a supernatural chief of ancient times who gathered all the food plants in a net and hung them in the sky among the stars of the Pleiades. The result was famine.]

hume  (4) 299E hume i ka malo, e hoʻokala i ka ihe.Gird the loincloth, sharpen the spear.
 [A call to prepare for war or to prepare for the project at hand.]
  2223Na kahi ka malo, na kahi e hume.The loincloth of one, the other can wear.
 [A close relationship. As a general rule, Hawaiians would not wear the clothing of people other than blood relatives. In explaining genealogy to a young relative, this conveyed the idea that a relationship was near enough to warrant the wearing of each other’s clothing.]
  2341Nona ka malo, naʻu e hume; noʻu ka malo, nāna e hume.His loincloth I could wear; my loincloth he could wear.
 [Said of very close kin.]

humu  (1) 831He naha ipu auaneʻi o paʻa i ka hupau humu.It isn’t a break in a gourd container that can he easily mended by sewing the parts together.
 [A broken relationship is not as easily mended as a broken gourd. Also, the breaking up of the family brought a stop to the support each gave the other.]

hūnā  (10) 20Ahuwale ka nane hūnā.The hidden answer to the riddle is seen.
 [That which was a secret is no longer hidden.]
  304Eia ka lua hūnā o nā aliʻi: ʻo ka waha.Here is the secret cave of the chiefs: the mouth.
 [We refuse to discuss our chiefs too freely.]
  836He nane hūnā ia.A riddle whose answer is well hidden.
  913He poʻo hūnā i ka lewa.A head hidden in the sky.
 [Said of a god, who is invisible. Also expressed He poʻo hūnā i ke aoūli.]
  1269Ka ʻai hūnā i ka poli.The food hidden in the bosom.
 [Breast milk.]
  1508Kanukanu, hūnā i ka meheu, i ka maʻawe alanui o Kapuʻukolu.Covering with earth, hiding the footprints on the narrow trail of Kapuukolu.
 [Said of a cautious person who guards his ways from those who pry. In ancient times a person who did not want to be traced by his footsteps carefully eradicated them as he went.]

more hūnā
1653Ka wai hūnā a ka pāoʻo.The hidden water of the pāoʻo fish.
 [A little pool of water on Lehua often mentioned in chants of Niʻihau. It is said to be guarded by a supernatural pāoʻo fish. When this fish rises to the surface, its back resembles the surrounding rocks, which makes the pool difficult to see. When the pāoʻo sinks to the bottom, the water can again be seen. Also, a pool not far from the crater of Kīlauea. The priests of Pele who knew of its location obtained water from it to mix with the ʻawa drinks they offered to her. Like the pool on Lehua, a supernatural pāoʻo fish guarded it. This pool was destroyed during the making of a road.]

huna lepo  (1) 625He iki huna lepo mai kēia e pula ai ka maka.This is a small speck of dust that causes a roughness in the eye.
 [One may be small but he can still cause distress. This was the retort of Kaʻehuiki, a shark-god of Puna, when he was taunted for his small size by Kaiʻanuilalawalu, shark-god of Kīpahulu, Maui.]

hunahuna  (1) 2602Papani ka uka o Kapela; puaʻi hānono wai ʻole o Kukaniloko; pakī hunahuna ʻole o Holoholokū; ʻaʻohe mea nāna e ʻaʻe paepae kapu o Līloa.Close the upland of Kapela; no red water gushes from Kukaniloko; not a particle issues from Holoholokū; there is none to step over the sacred platform of Līloa.
 [The old chiefs and their sacredness are gone; the descendants are no longer laid to rest at Ka-pela-kapu-o-Kakaʻe at ʻīao; the descendants no longer point to Kukaniloko on Oʻahu and Holoholokū on Kauaʻi as the sacred birthplaces; there is no one to tread on the sacred places in Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, where Līloa once dwelt.]

hūnōai  (3) 262E aʻo i ka hana o pā i ka leo o ka makua hūnōai.Learn to work lest you be struck by the voice of the parent-in-law.
 [Advice to a son or daughter before marriage.]
  662He kaikamahine ke keiki, ola nā iwi; ʻo ke keiki kāne he hānai mākua hūnōai.A girl child brings life to the bones [of her parents], but a boy child supports his parents-in-law.
 [In old Hawaiʻi, a man went to live with his wife’s parents, while a woman remained with her own.]
  1062Hoʻohoihoi makua hūnōai.A pleasing of a parent-in-law.
 [Said of one who begins with much enthusiasm but soon loses interest.]

hupau  (1) 831He naha ipu auaneʻi o paʻa i ka hupau humu.It isn’t a break in a gourd container that can he easily mended by sewing the parts together.
 [A broken relationship is not as easily mended as a broken gourd. Also, the breaking up of the family brought a stop to the support each gave the other.]

hūpe  (1) 1470Kamaliʻi hūpe kole.Runny-nosed brats.

hūpē  (1) 2051Mai hoʻomakamaka wahine, he hūpē ka loaʻa.Do not make friends of a woman lest you blow your nose with weeping.
 [Advice to a bride. Be too friendly with another woman and she may hecome too friendly with your husband.]

hupo  (1) 602He hupo no ka waʻa pae.A stupid one belonging to the canoe landing.
 [Little skill is required to get a canoe out of the water at a landing. Said of one whose knowledge is very shallow and whose skill is practically nil.]

Hupō-e-nui  (1) 1146Hupō-e-nui.Extremely stupid.
 [Applied to those whose blood was mingled with that of kauā.]

 A    E    H    I    K    L    M    N    O    P    R    S    U    W