updated: 3/23/2019

ʻŌlelo Noʻeau
Concordance

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I

i    ia    iah    iak    iao    iau    ie    ihe    ihi    iho    ihu    ii    ika    ike    iki    iku    ili    ilo    imi    imu    ina    ini    ino    inu    io    iol    ipo    ipu    iwa    iwi    

i  (1,358) 2ʻAʻa i ka hula, waiho ka hilahila i ka hale.When one wants to dance the hula, bashfulness should be left at home.
 [Also expressed Aʻo i ka hula,....]
  3A ʻai ka manu i luna.The birds feed above.
 [An attractive person is compared to a flower-laden tree that attracts birds.]
  5Aʻeaʻe mōhala i luna o ke kukui.Whiteness unfolds on the kukui trees.
 [Used in reference to a person who grays, comparing him to a blooming kukui tree laden with white flowers.]
  6ʻĀhaʻi akula i ka welowelo.Took off into the breeze.
 [Rose in triumph, as a kite rises into the sky; hastened away with great speed.]
  7ʻĀhaʻi lā i ka pupuhi.Away like a gust [of wind].
 [Travel with the speed of wind.]
  14Ahu ka hoka i Kapākai.A heap of disappointment at Kapākai.
 [Fooled and left stranded. In ancient times, two fishermen sailed from Kapākai, a small canoe landing between ʻUpolu Point and the heiau of Moʻokini in Kohala. As they were about to leave for Maui, a stranger asked permission to accompany them, and it was granted. Late that night one of the fishermen signaled to the other to toss the passenger overboard because he was doing nothing to help with the canoe. The passenger guessed what they were up to and cried, “Oh! I forgot my cowry sinkers at the canoe landing.” Cowry sinkers were valuable, so they turned about and retumed to Kapākai. Upon landing, the passenger leaped ashore. When asked where the sinkers were, he pointed to two half-buried rocks nearby. The fishermen were disappointed (hoka) in not obtaining the coveted cowry sinkers. In another version the saying originated at the birth of Kamehameha I on a canoe. At the landing at Kapākai his mother pretended illness, whieh drew attention to herself and gave Naeʻole the opportunity to seize the newborn baby and flee with him into hiding.]

more i
16Ahu kāpeku i ka nalu o Puhili.Much thrashing about in the surf of Puhili.
 [Signifying an abundance of food. Thrashing about in the water drives fish into the nets.]

ʻī  (5) 195ʻAʻohe nō hoʻi ou ʻī mai ʻaʻohe wai o lalo.You didn’t tell me that there wasn’t any water below.
 [Why didn’t you warn me? Two men, one totally and one partially blind, wanted to cross Punaluʻu Stream in Kaʻū. The blind one didn’t know his companion was unable to see well. When they reached the bank he asked his companion, “Is there water down there?” The partly blind one replied, “Yes, there is.” So they jumped in with the intention of swimming across. But the stream was dry, and both men suffered broken bones and bruises.]
  253E akahele i ka mamo a ʻĪ, o kolo mai ka mole uaua.Beware the descendant of ʻĪ, lest the tough roots crawl forth.
 [A warning uttered by Palena, a chief of Kohala, who saw Kuaʻana-a-ʻĪ cruelly treated by the chiefs of Kona. Kuaʻana later went to see the people of his mother, Hoʻoleialiʻi, in Hāna, and to help the chiefs of Hilo in fighting those of Kona.]
  561He hālau loa na ʻĪ.A longhouse belonging to ʻĪ.
 [ʻĪ was a wise and generous chief and because he was an ancestor of many, he was referred to as the owner of the longhouse in which all were sheltered. ʻĪ also had a large longhouse in Hilo called ʻĪ-hālau, and a fish station at sea called ʻĪ-koʻa. It is said that when those of ʻĪ-hālau closed their food bowls all at once after eating, the sound could be heard at ʻĪ-koʻa.]
  1292Ka hālau a ʻĪ.The house of ʻĪ.
 [The descendants of ʻĪ, who extended through Hāmākua, Hilo, Puna and Kaʻū. One of these was ʻĪmakakoloa, who was condemned to death by Kamehameha. According to the historian Kamakau, ʻĪmakakoloa was put to death in Kamaʻoa. But according to the people of Kaʻū, a junior kinsman of similar appearance was substituted at the execution.]
  1768Ke momole nei no ka mole ʻo ʻĪ.The ʻĪ chiefs still adhere to their taproots.
 [The descendants of ʻĪ hold fast.]

ʻĪ  (5) 195ʻAʻohe nō hoʻi ou ʻī mai ʻaʻohe wai o lalo.You didn’t tell me that there wasn’t any water below.
 [Why didn’t you warn me? Two men, one totally and one partially blind, wanted to cross Punaluʻu Stream in Kaʻū. The blind one didn’t know his companion was unable to see well. When they reached the bank he asked his companion, “Is there water down there?” The partly blind one replied, “Yes, there is.” So they jumped in with the intention of swimming across. But the stream was dry, and both men suffered broken bones and bruises.]
  253E akahele i ka mamo a ʻĪ, o kolo mai ka mole uaua.Beware the descendant of ʻĪ, lest the tough roots crawl forth.
 [A warning uttered by Palena, a chief of Kohala, who saw Kuaʻana-a-ʻĪ cruelly treated by the chiefs of Kona. Kuaʻana later went to see the people of his mother, Hoʻoleialiʻi, in Hāna, and to help the chiefs of Hilo in fighting those of Kona.]
  561He hālau loa na ʻĪ.A longhouse belonging to ʻĪ.
 [ʻĪ was a wise and generous chief and because he was an ancestor of many, he was referred to as the owner of the longhouse in which all were sheltered. ʻĪ also had a large longhouse in Hilo called ʻĪ-hālau, and a fish station at sea called ʻĪ-koʻa. It is said that when those of ʻĪ-hālau closed their food bowls all at once after eating, the sound could be heard at ʻĪ-koʻa.]
  1292Ka hālau a ʻĪ.The house of ʻĪ.
 [The descendants of ʻĪ, who extended through Hāmākua, Hilo, Puna and Kaʻū. One of these was ʻĪmakakoloa, who was condemned to death by Kamehameha. According to the historian Kamakau, ʻĪmakakoloa was put to death in Kamaʻoa. But according to the people of Kaʻū, a junior kinsman of similar appearance was substituted at the execution.]
  1768Ke momole nei no ka mole ʻo ʻĪ.The ʻĪ chiefs still adhere to their taproots.
 [The descendants of ʻĪ hold fast.]

ia  (111) 130ʻAʻohe e hōʻike ana ka mea hewa ua hewa ia.The wrongdoer does not tell on himself.
  145ʻAʻohe ia e loaʻa aku, he ulua kāpapa no ka moana.He cannot be caught for he is an ulua fish of the deep ocean.
 [Said in admiration of a hero or warrior who will not give up without a struggle.]
  162ʻAʻohe kana mai o ka holo o ka lio ia Hanalē; pākahi a ka lio, pālua a ka lio.How Henry made the horses run; one on a horse or two on a horse.
 [How hunger (Henry) made the fingers work in conveying poi to the mouth — with one fmger and with two.]
  191ʻAʻohe na ia mau mea e uē iā ʻoe, na ke kanaka ʻoe e uē.Things will not mourn you, but people will.
 [Said to one who thinks more of his possessions than of his kinfolk or friends.]
  192ʻAʻohe nānā; he holoholona ia he mea ʻuhane ʻole; o ke kanaka nō ka nānā, he mea ʻuhane.Never mind; it is an animal, a soulless creature; take heed of man, for he is a creature with a soul.
  225ʻAʻole e ʻōlelo mai ana ke ahi ua ana ia.Fire will never say that it has had enough.
 [The fire of anger or of love will burn as long as it has something to feed upon.]

more ia
266E ao o pau poʻo, pau hiʻu ia manō.Be careful lest you go head and tail into the shark.
 [A warning to be on one’s guard. Nanaue, of Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, had two forms — that of a man and that of a shark. As people passed his farm to go to the beach, he would utter this warning. After they had passed, he would run to the river, change into a shark, and swim under the water to the sea where he would catch and eat those he had warned. No one knew that it was Nanaue who was eating the people until someone pulled off the shoulder covering he always wore and discovered a shark’s mouth between his shoulder blades. After he was put to death the people were safe again.]

  (49) 35Aia Kaʻaikiola.Kaʻaikiola has it.
 [Mr. Throw-away has it. A play on the name Ka-ʻai-kiola (Throw-away-food). Said when an article is carelessly mislaid.]
  52Aia ka ʻike Polihua a lei i ka mānewanewa.One proves a visit to Polihua by wearing a lei of mānewanewa.
 [A person proves his visit to a place by bringing back something native to the area. Refers to Polihua, Lānaʻi.]
  74Aia paha Lima-ʻāpā.Perhaps Touch-hand has taken it.
 [Somebody with very quick hands must have taken it.]
  112A! Loaʻa akula ʻoe nā niu o Kaunalewa.Ah! Now you have the coconuts of Kaunalewa.
 [Your worldly possessions are gone. An impolite saying with a play on Kau-nā-lewa (Hang-suspended), as if to say, “Now all you have is a hanging scrotum.” Kaunalewa was a famous coconut grove on Kauaʻi.]
  127ʻAʻohe ʻalawa wale iho Maliʻo.Not even a glance at Maliʻo.
 [Said of a haughty person. Pele was once so annoyed with Maliʻo and her brother Halaaniani that she turned them both into stone and let them lie in the sea in Puna, Hawaiʻi. It was at the bay named after Halaaniani that clusters of pandanus were tossed into the sea with tokens to loved ones. These were borne by the current to Kamilo in Kaʻū.]
  128ʻAʻohe aʻu ʻala ʻinamona ʻoukou.I do not find even the fragrance of roasted kukui nuts in you.
 [I don’t find the least bit of good in you. First uttered by Pele to her sisters, who refused to go to Kauaʻi for her lover, Lohi’au.]

more
132ʻAʻohe e loaʻa Niu-a-Kāne ʻoe.Youll never be able to reach Kāne’s coconuts.
 [Said of something unattainable. Niu-a-Kāne is a rock islet in the sea at Hāna, Maui.]

iʻa  (172) 23Aia a kau ka iʻa i ka waʻa, manaʻo ke ola.One can think of life after the fish is in the canoe.
 [Before one feels elated and makes plans he should first secure his “fish.”]
  38Aia i ka huki nehu, ka iʻa kaulana o ka ʻāina.Gone to haul in the nehu, the well-known fish of the land.
 [Gone to get nehu for bait. Gone to get her man; that is, gone to get the bait that will get him.]
  62Aia ko kāne i ka lawaiʻa, hoʻi mai he ʻōpeʻa ka iʻa.Your husband has gone fishing and returns with bats for meat.
 [This saying comes from a children’s chant of amusement for coaxing a sea animal to crawl from its shell.]
  120Anu hewa i ka pō, he kuʻuna iʻa ʻole.Feeling the cold air of the night was all in vain; no fish was caught in the net.
 [A wasted effort.]
  123Anu ʻo ʻEwa i ka iʻa hāmau leo e. E hāmau!ʻEwa is made cold by the fish that silences the voice. Hush!
 [A warning to keep still. First uttered by Hiʻiaka to her friend Wahineʻomaʻo to warn her not to speak to Lohiʻau while they were in a canoe near ʻEwa.]
  161ʻAʻohe kanaka o kauhale, aia i Mānā, ua haohia i ka iʻa iki.No one is at home, for all have gone to Mānā, attracted there by small fishes.
 [Said of one who is distracted by an insignificant matter or goes away on any excuse.]

more iʻa
204ʻAʻohe pilipili ʻāina wale mai, aia ka iʻa i ke kai.The fish remain at sea and come nowhere near the shore.
 [Said of a person who avoids his friends or relatives.]

ʻia  (118) 4A aloha wale ʻia kā hoʻi o Kaunuohua, he puʻu wale nō.Even Kaunuohua, a hill, is loved.
 [If a hill can be loved, how much more so a human?]
  31Aia a paʻi ʻia ka maka, haʻi ʻia kupuna nāna ʻoe.Only when your face is slapped should you tell who your ancestors are.
 [Hawaiians were taught never to boast of illustrious ancestors. But when one is slandered and called an offspring of worthless people, he should mention his ancestors to prove that the statement is wrong.]
  81ʻAina kō kiola wale ʻia i ka nahele.Sugar-cane trash thrown in the wilderness.
 [A derogatory expression applied to a person of no consequence.]
  124ʻAʻohe ʻai pani ʻia o ka ʻamo.No particular food blocks the anus.
 [All food is good; there is none that hinders evacuation. A rude remark to a very finicky person.]
  142ʻAʻohe hana nui ke alu ʻia.No task is too big when done together by all.
  147ʻAʻohe ʻike o ka puaʻa nona ka imu e hōʻā ʻia nei.The pig does not know that the imu is being lighted for it.
 [Said of a person who is unaware that he is being victimized.]

more ʻia
209ʻAʻohe puʻu kiʻekiʻe ke hoʻāʻo ʻia e piʻi.No cliff is so tall that it cannot be scaled.
 [No problem is too great when one tries hard to solve it.]

ʻiāhini  (1) 949He ʻiāhini ka iʻa o kahi maloʻo.The locust is the meat of dry places.
 [Said of a type of locust, now extinct, that was easy to catch and much eaten when fish were scarce.]

ʻiako  (1) 1138Huli ka malau, ka ʻiako a ka lawaiʻa.The malau that serves as an outrigger of the canoe is turned over.
 [Work is done. The malau is a live-bait carrier attached to the canoe. When the fishing was done the empty malau was tumed over. First used by Hiʻiaka in a chant when she saw two shark men flee at the sight of her, though she intended no harm.]

ʻiao  (1) 449Hānai ʻia i ka ʻiao.Fed with ʻiao fish.
 [One is given small gifts to interest him until, like the deep-sea fish, he takes the hook and is landed. The ʻiao is a small fish used as a bait for large, deep-sea fish.]

ʻĪao  (3) 1529Ka pali kāohi kumu aliʻi o ʻĪao.The cliff of ʻĪao that embraces the chiefly sources.
 [ʻĪao, Maui, was the burial place of many chiefs of high rank who are the ancestors of living chiefs.]
  1781Ke pani wai o ʻĪao.The dam of ʻĪao.
 [In a battle between Kamehameha and Kalanikūpule at ʻĪao, Maui, the latter escaped and fled to Oʻahu. The stream of ʻĪao was dammed by the bodies of the dead. This battle was called Kaʻuwaʻupali (Precipice-clawing) because the defeated warriors clawed the hillside in an attempt to escape.]
  2207Nae iki ʻĪao i ka uhiwai.Īao is barely breathing in the heavy mist.
 [Said of one who is in dire distress, with trouble pressing on all sides.]

iaʻu  (2) 90ʻAkahi a komo ke anu iaʻu, ua nahā ka hale e malu ai.Cold now penetrates me, for the house that shelters is broken.
 [Fear enters when protection is gone. Said by ʻAikanaka of Kauaʻi when two of his war leaders were destroyed by Kawelo.]
  373E pili mai auaneʻi ia pupuka iaʻu!That homeliness will not attach itself to me!
 [Ugliness is not contagious. Said by a good-looking person in answer to, “I wonder why a handsome person like you should have such a homely mate.”]

iʻe  (1) 1164I hole ʻia nō ka iʻe i ke kau o ka lā.The time to cut designs in a tapa beater is when the sun is high.
 [Do your work when you can do your best.]

ihe  (5) 201ʻAʻohe pahuna ihe hala a ka Maluakele.The Maluakele wind never misses with its spear-like thrusts.
 [Said in praise of one who always gets what he is after.]
  299E hume i ka malo, e hoʻokala i ka ihe.Gird the loincloth, sharpen the spear.
 [A call to prepare for war or to prepare for the project at hand.]
  378E uhaʻi i ka maka o ka ihe.Break off the point of the spear.
 [Cease warfare and resume friendly relations.]
  1785Ke wela nei nō ka ʻili i ka maka ihe.The skin still feels the heated sting of the spear point.
 [Said when one is still at war. First uttered by Keaweamaʻuhili to Kahāhana.]
  2775Ua ʻeha ka ʻili i ka maka o ka ihe.The skin has been hurt by the point of the spear.
 [Said of a warrior who has been wounded in war. This was said with pride and affection, for it meant that he had been faithful to his chief.]

ihea  (1) 2800Ua ka ua i Papakōlea, ihea ʻoe?When it rained in Papakōlea, where were you ?
 [The reply of a sweet-potato grower on Papakōlea to one who asks for some of his crop. If one answered that he had been there when the rain fell to soak the earth for planting, and had not planted, then he was lazy and would be given no potatoes.]

ʻihi  (2) 1161ʻIhi ka kua, meha ka alo; ka hua i ka umauma hōʻike ʻia.Sacred is the back, silent the front; the word on the chest, reveal.
 [An expression often used by chiefs. No one stands behind and no one else is here in my presence, so deliver your message to me.]
  1682Keauhou i ka ʻihi kapu.Keauhou, where strict kapu were observed.
 [Keauhou, Kona. This was the place where many of the highest chiefs resided and where Kamehameha III was born.]

ʻihiʻihi  (1) 843He nohona ʻihiʻihi ko ke alo aliʻi.Life in the presence of a chief is very rigid in strictness.

iho  (37) 29Aia anei ka maka i ke kua o ʻike ʻole iho?Are the eyes on the back that one cannot see what is being done?
 [Said of one who declares that he doesn’t know how to do a certain thing and perhaps will not be able to learn.]
  127ʻAʻohe ʻalawa wale iho iā Maliʻo.Not even a glance at Maliʻo.
 [Said of a haughty person. Pele was once so annoyed with Maliʻo and her brother Halaaniani that she turned them both into stone and let them lie in the sea in Puna, Hawaiʻi. It was at the bay named after Halaaniani that clusters of pandanus were tossed into the sea with tokens to loved ones. These were borne by the current to Kamilo in Kaʻū.]
  148ʻAʻohe ʻike wale iho iā Maliʻo, i ka huhuki laweau a Uwēkahuna.Malio is not recognized because Uwēkahuna is drawing her away.
 [Said of one who refuses to recognize old friends and associates or is snubbed by friends because they have interests elsewhere. Maliʻo was a mythical woman of Puna whom Pele once snubbed. Uwēkahuna is the bluff overlooking the crater of Kīlauea.]
  149ʻAʻohe ʻike wale iho i ke kinikini o Kolokini, i ka wawalo o ke kai o Kahalahala.[He] does not deign to recognize the multitude of Kolokini, nor the roaring of the sea of Kahalahala.
 [Said of a person who deliberately refuses to recognize kith or kin and goes about with a haughty air.]
  150ʻAʻohe i maneʻo iho ke kumu pepeiao i kau hīmeni.Even the base of the ear isn’t tickled by your song.
 [A rude remark to one whose song or story is not appealing.]
  197ʻAʻohe o kahi nānā o luna o ka pali; iho mai a lalo nei; ʻike i ke au nui ke au iki, he alo a he alo.The top of the cliff isnt the place to look at us; come down here and learn of the big and little current, face to face.
 [Learn the details. Also, an invitation to discuss something. Said by Pele to Pāʻoa when he came to seek the lava-encased remains of his friend Lohiʻau.]

more iho
282E hiolo ana nā kapu kahiko; e hina ana nā heiau me nā lele; e hui ana nā moku; he iho mai ana ka lani a e piʻi ana ka honua.The ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars willfall; the islands will be united; the heavens will descend and the earth ascend.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time. The last part of the saying means that chiefs will come down to humble positions and commoners rise to positions of honor.]

ihola  (6) 1106Hoʻonuʻu ihola a kū kahauli.Ate with eagerness until he stood up with excitement.
 [Said of a person who tries to please by eagerly heeding everyone’s advice and commands, and by so doing receives approval and advancement.]
  1163Iho ihola ka puna palaʻai.Down goes the pumpkin spoon.
 [Said in derision to one who pouts, whose pouting lips are compared to a spoon.]
  1200ʻIke aku, ʻike mai, kōkua aku kōkua mai; pēlā ihola ka nohona ʻohana.Recognize and he recognized, help and he helped; such is family life.
 [Family life requires an exchange of mutual help and recognition.]
  1872ihola i Mamalakā, i ka hale o Kāneheoheo.There one stands at Mamalakā, the house of Kāneheoheo.
 [Luck has departed, and one is left disappointed. A play on heo (to be gone or to depart) in Kāneheoheo.]
  2409ʻO ka iki hāwaʻe ihola nō ia o Miloliʻi.Here is the little sea urchin of Miloliʻi.
 [A boast. I am small but potent.]
  2739Pulu ihola i ka wai a ka nāulu.Drenched by the water from the rain clouds.
 [Drunk.]

ihona  (2) 617He ihona, he piʻina, he kaolo.A going down, a going up, a going on a level road.
 [So it is with life.]
  1498Kani ke ʻō, he ihona pali.One may shout with joy, as this is a going downhill.
 [The hard work is over; from here on all is easy.]

ihu  (21) 59Aia ke ola i ka ihu o ka lio.Life is where the horse’s nose points.
 [The scent of food leads one toward sustenance.]
  73Aia nō ke ea i ka puka ihu.The breath is still in the nostrils.
 [A facetious reply when someone asks how a friend or relative is.]
  600He huluhulu kau i ka puka ihu.Hair growing inside of the nostril.
 [Said in envy of a person who is regarded as a favorite by a superior — he is so closely allied to the person that he is likened to a hair in the other’s nostril. Also said in criticism of one who is made too much of.]
  1008Hinuhinu ka ihu, pohā ka ʻauwae.When the nose shines, the chin gets a blow.
 [Said of a drunken person who gets into a fight.]
  1055Hō mai ka ihu, a hele aʻe au.Give hither the nose ere I go.
 [Kiss me ere I depart.]
  1206ʻIke ʻia aʻe nō ma ka huluhulu kau i ka puka ihu.Attention is paid only to the hairs of the nostrils.
 [Attention is paid to the favored few whom one does not like to offend.]

more ihu
1376Ka iʻa pā i ka ihu o ka waʻa a lele.The fish that touches the prow of the canoe and leaps.
 [The mālolo, or flying fish.]

ʻiʻi  (1) 1805Kioea ʻai pua ʻiʻi o Hīlia.The kioea bird that eats the fish spawn of Hīlia.
 [Said of the kioea (curlew), an eater of little fish, or of a big fellow who gobbles up little ones.]

īkā  (1) 2554Paʻa ʻia iho i ka hoe uli i ʻole e īkā i ke koʻa.Hold the steering paddle steady to keep from striking the rock.
 [Hold on; donʻt let yourself get into trouble.]

ikaika  (6) 223ʻAʻole e kū ka ikaika i kēia pakela nui; ke pōʻai mai nei ka ʻohu ma uka, ma kai, ma ʻō a ma ʻaneʻi.One cannot show his strength against such odds; the rain clouds are circling from the upland, the lowland, and from all sides.
 [Said by Maheleana, a warrior of Kualiʻi, when he saw his small company surrounded by the enemy.]
  275E hānai ʻawa a ikaika ka makani.Feed with ʻawa that the spirit may gain strength.
 [One offers ʻawa and prayers to the dead so that their spirits may grow strong and be a source of help to the family.]
  618He ikaika ke kanaka kaena i ka wā pilikia ʻole, akā he hōhē wale i ka lā o ka pilikia.A braggart is strong when there is no trouble, but flees when there is.
  619He ikaika nō nā ʻehu kakahiaka no nā ʻōpio, a piʻi aʻe ka lā heha mai a holo.The morning is full of strength for youth, but when the sun is high they become tired and run.
 [Said of the young who do not work as persistently as their parents — they start well but soon quit.]
  1147I aʻa nō i ka lā o ka ikaika.He can be daring as long as his strength lasts.
 [Said of a cocky person. As long as he has more strength than others, he acts the bully; but it soon ends when someone superior shows up.]
  2450ʻO ke aliʻi ka mea ikaika, ʻaʻole ʻo ke kanaka.It is the chief who is strong, not the commoner.
 [A commoner’s own work of planting and fishing is limited by his physical ability. A chief can command a multitude to carry out his projects.]

Ikapoka  (1) 2793Ua Ikapoka, ua hala ka nani o ka Ikelaʻela.It is Ichabod, for the glory of Israel has departed.
 [It is too late to do anything about it. Also expressed simply Ua Ikapoka.]

ʻike  (76) 29Aia anei ka maka i ke kua o ʻike ʻole iho?Are the eyes on the back that one cannot see what is being done?
 [Said of one who declares that he doesn’t know how to do a certain thing and perhaps will not be able to learn.]
  52Aia ka ʻike iā Polihua a lei i ka mānewanewa.One proves a visit to Polihua by wearing a lei of mānewanewa.
 [A person proves his visit to a place by bringing back something native to the area. Refers to Polihua, Lānaʻi.]
  91ʻAkahi au a ʻike i ka ʻino o Hilo.It is the first time I have seen a Hilo storm.
 [For the first time I have met with evil people who wish to harm me.]
  147ʻAʻohe ʻike o ka puaʻa nona ka imu e hōʻā ʻia nei.The pig does not know that the imu is being lighted for it.
 [Said of a person who is unaware that he is being victimized.]
  148ʻAʻohe ʻike wale iho iā Maliʻo, i ka huhuki laweau a Uwēkahuna.Malio is not recognized because Uwēkahuna is drawing her away.
 [Said of one who refuses to recognize old friends and associates or is snubbed by friends because they have interests elsewhere. Maliʻo was a mythical woman of Puna whom Pele once snubbed. Uwēkahuna is the bluff overlooking the crater of Kīlauea.]
  149ʻAʻohe ʻike wale iho i ke kinikini o Kolokini, i ka wawalo o ke kai o Kahalahala.[He] does not deign to recognize the multitude of Kolokini, nor the roaring of the sea of Kahalahala.
 [Said of a person who deliberately refuses to recognize kith or kin and goes about with a haughty air.]

more ʻike
171ʻAʻohe lihi ʻike aku i ka nani o Punahoa.Hasn’t known the beauty of Punahoa.
 [Used when the charms of a person or place are unknown. Punahoa is an unusually attractive place.]

ʻikea  (3) 839He Napoʻopoʻo i ʻikea ke poʻo, he Napoʻopoʻo nō i ʻikea ka pepeiao.A [person of] Napoʻopoʻo whose head is seen; a Napoʻopoʻo whose ears are seen.
 [A play on napoʻo (to sink), as the sun sinks in the west. No matter what your claim to rank may be, we can see that your head is low and that your mindfulness of etiquette is equally low.]
  1203ʻIkea maila ʻo Mānā, ua hāʻale i ka wai liʻulā.Mānā notices the waters of the mirage.
 [The attempt to fool is very obvious.]

Ikelaʻela  (1) 2793Ua Ikapoka, ua hala ka nani o ka Ikelaʻela.It is Ichabod, for the glory of Israel has departed.
 [It is too late to do anything about it. Also expressed simply Ua Ikapoka.]

ʻikena  (1) 2814Ua lehulehu a manomano ka ʻikena a ka Hawaiʻi.Great and numerous is the knowledge of the Hawaiians.

iki  (34) 161ʻAʻohe kanaka o kauhale, aia i Mānā, ua haohia i ka iʻa iki.No one is at home, for all have gone to Mānā, attracted there by small fishes.
 [Said of one who is distracted by an insignificant matter or goes away on any excuse.]
  197ʻAʻohe o kahi nānā o luna o ka pali; iho mai a lalo nei; ʻike i ke au nui ke au iki, he alo a he alo.The top of the cliff isnt the place to look at us; come down here and learn of the big and little current, face to face.
 [Learn the details. Also, an invitation to discuss something. Said by Pele to Pāʻoa when he came to seek the lava-encased remains of his friend Lohiʻau.]
  303Eia ka iki nowelo a ka mikioi.Here is the clever and dainty little one.
 [A boast, meaning “I may be little, but....”]
  325E kuhikuhi pono i nā au iki a me nā au nui o ka ʻike.Instruct well in the little and the large currents of knowledge.
 [In teaching, do it well; the small details are as important as the large ones.]
  344E mālama i ka iki kanaka, i ka nuʻa kanaka. O kākou nō kēia hoʻākua.Take care of the insignificant and the great man. That is the duty of us gods.
 [Said by Hiʻiaka to Pele in a chant before she departed for Kauaʻi to seek Lohiʻau.]
  451Hāna i ka iʻa iki.Hāna of the little fish.
 [Believing slanderous tales about Kuʻula and his wife, Hinahele, the ruling chief of Hāna ordered them destroyed. Having mana over the fish of the sea, the two caused a scarcity until their son ʻAiʻai brought them back to life. Kuʻula and Hinahele were worshipped as deities by fishermen.]

more iki
526He ala iki ko kahuna.A kahuna has a narrow trail.
 [A kahuna should mind and be careful of what he does.]

ikiiki  (3) 1214Ikiiki i ka lā o Keawalua.Depressed with the heat of Keawalua.
 [Sick and tired of living in an atmosphere of unkindness and hatred.]
  1423Ka lā ikiiki o Honolulu.The intensely warm days of Honolulu.
 [People from the country often claim that Honolulu is excessively warm.]
  2389ʻO Ikiiki ke kāne, ʻo Hoʻopaupaualio ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he keiki huhū koke.Ikiiki is the husband, Hoʻopaupauaho (Cause-shortness-of-breath) is the wife; a child born to them is short of temper.
 [Said of a child born in the month of Ikiiki.]

ʻIkuwā  (6) 2390ʻO ʻIkuwā i pohā kōʻeleʻele, ʻikuwā ke kai, ʻikuwā ka hekili, ʻikuwā ka manu.ʻIkuwā is the month when the dark storms arise, the sea roars, the thunder roars, the birds make a din.
  2391ʻO ʻIkuwā ke kāne, ʻo Paʻiakuli ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he leo nui.ʻIkuwā is the husband, Paʻia-kuli (Deafening-noise) is the wife; a child born to them is loud of voice.
 [Said of a child born in the month of ʻIkuwā.]
  2562Paʻapaʻaʻina ka malo i loko o ʻIkuwā.The [flap of the] loincloth [flutters and] snaps in the month of ʻIkuwā.
 [ʻIkuwā is a month of rains, winds, and thunderstorms.]

ʻili  (23) 1ʻAʻahu ʻili kao.Wearer of goat hide.
 [An expression of contempt for a person who is so lazy he uses goat hides instead of mats, which require work to make, for his bedding. Such a person is recognized by his goaty odor.]
  172ʻAʻohe like o ka ʻili.The skin is not alike.
 [Some Hawaiians have an aversion to wearing someone else’s clothing, not knowing whether they are equals in bloodline, rank, or background. This saying does not express that they are of a different race, only of different family backgrounds.]
  630He ʻili puakea.Skin like a white blossom.
 [Said of a white person.]
  670He kāne ʻeha ʻole o ka ʻili.A husband who does not inflict pain on his wife.
 [Said by a wife in appreciation for a husband who never beats her.]
  672He kapa maloʻo wale ka ʻili.The skin is a garment that dries easily.
 [Being wet is nothing to worry about.]
  813He mea aloha ʻia ke kāne i ka ʻili.The husband of the skin is to be loved.
 [One’s husband, who is as close as the skin of one’s body, should always be loved. The term for a husband who is always near, in joy and in sorrow, is “Kāne i ka ʻili.” Such a wife is “ Wahine i ka ʻili.”]

more ʻili
876He paepae wāwae koʻu ʻili no kona kapuaʻi.My skin is like the soles of his feet.
 [An expression of humbleness acknowledging the superiority of another.]

ʻiliahi  (1) 1662Ka wai ʻula ʻiliahi o Waimea.The red sandalwood water of Waimea.
 [This expression is sometimes used in old chants of Waimea, Kauaʻi. After a storm Waimea Stream is said to run red. Where it meets Makaweli Stream to form Waimea River, the water is sometimes red on one side and clear on the other. The red side is called wai ʻula ʻiliahi.]

ʻiliʻili  (7) 529He ʻalamihi no ka lae ʻiliʻili.A mud crab on a rocky point.
 [Just a noisemaker.]
  731Hele aku nei e ʻimi i ka ʻiliʻili hānau o Kōloa.Went to seek the pebbles that give birth at Kōloa.
 [Said of one who goes and forgets to come home. These pebbles were found at a small beach called Kōloa, in Punaluʻu, Kaʻū.]
  1227ʻIliʻili o Hāloa.Pebbles of Hāloa.
 [Descendants of chiefs of Hāloa, grandson of Wākea and Papa, or any chiefs descended from the gods.]
  1405Ka ʻiliʻili o ʻĀʻalāmanu.Pebbles of ʻĀʻalāmanu.
 [ʻAʻalāmanu is in Puna, Hawaiʻi. The best pebbles of this district were found here and were much liked by the chiefs for the game of kōnane.]
  1406Ka ʻiliʻili o Kalaekimo.The pebbles of Kalaekimo.
 [Kalaekimo is where the chiefs of Kaʻū played the game of kimo. The pebbles there were much liked for the purpose. The place is now called Kalaeokimo.]
  1668Keaʻau, i ke kai nehe i ka ʻiliʻili.Keaʻau, where the sea murmurs over the pebbles.
 [Keaʻau, Hawaiʻi.]
  1683Keauhou, kai nehe i ka ʻiliʻili.Keauhou, where the sea murmurs to the pebbles.
 [Keauhou, Puna, Hawaiʻi.]

ʻiliki  (1) 1228ʻIliki ke kai i ka ʻopeʻope lā, lilo; i lilo no he hāwāwā.The sea snatches the bundle and it is gone; it goes when one isn’t watchful.
 [A person who fails to watch out often loses.]

ʻilima  (3) 1312Kahilihili lau ʻilima.A brushing off with ʻilima leaves.
 [After leaping into dirt at Kaumaea, Kaʻū, the players wiped off the dust that adhered to their skin with ʻilima branches before going to Paiahaʻa to surf. Later applied to one who takes a sketchy bath.]
  2487Ola nā ʻilima wai ʻole i ke ao ʻōpua.Healed are the ʻilima of waterless places by the rain cloud.
  2489Ola nō i ka pua o ka ʻilima.There is healing in the ʻilima blossoms.
 [The ʻilima blossom is one of the first medicines given to babies. It is a mild laxative. Hiʻiaka, goddess of medicine in Pele’s family, used ʻilima in some of her healings.]

ʻilina  (1) 2220ʻilina wai ʻole o Kohala.The waterless plains of Kohala, where water will not remain long.
 [After a downpour, the people look even in the hollows of rocks for the precious water.]

ʻīlio  (16) 84ʻAi nō ka ʻīlio i kona luaʻi.A dog eats his own vomit.
 [Said of one who says nasty things of others and then has those very things happen to himself.]
  167ʻAʻohe laka o kā haʻi ʻīlio.Other people’s dogs do not mind you.
 [Said as a warning to beware of the gods of others.]
  310E ʻike i ka hoa kanaka, o kipa hewa ke aloha i ka ʻīlio.Recognize your fellow man lest your love be wasted on a dog.
 [Love man above animals.]
  389Haʻahaʻa haka, pau i ka ʻīlio.The contents of a low shelf can he stolen by dogs.
 [Things carelessly left about can be stolen. First said by Kamalalawalu to Lonoikamakahiki in making fun of the short stature of the latter’s half-brother and chief steward, Pupukea.]
  562He hale kanaka, ke ʻalalā ala no keiki, ke hae ala no ka ʻīlio.It is an inhabited house, for the wail of children and the bark of a dog are heard.
 [The signs of living about a home are the voices of humanity and animals. Used in answer to someone’s apology over their children crying or dogs barking.]
  628He ʻīlio kawaū.A damp, cold dog.
 [Used disparagingly or humorously of a person who shivers and is afraid of the cold. Dogs in old Hawaiʻi were rarely pampered and petted and were often seen shivering in cold, damp weather.]

more ʻīlio
629He ʻīlio welu moe poli.A well-fed dog that sleeps in the bosom.
 [Said of a well-fed pet dog or of a person who is able to work but is too pampered to want to.]

ʻiliwai  (1) 1067Hoʻokahi ʻiliwai o ka like.The likeness is all on one level.
 [One is just like the other.]

ilo  (2) 383ʻEu nō ka ilo, make!The maggot creeps, it dies!
  1852Kōpī wale nō i ka iʻa a ʻeu nō ka ilo.Though the fish is well salted, the maggots crawl.
 [Similar to the saying, “There’s a skeleton in every closet.”]

ʻīloli  (2) 771He loli ka iʻa, ʻīloli ke aloha.Loli is the sea creature, passionate is the love.
 [An expression used in hana aloha sorcery when loli was secured as an offering.]
  1713Ke kaha ʻai ʻole a ʻīloli.The foodless place, ʻĪloli.
 [ʻĪloli, Molokaʻi, was said to be a place where no food could be grown because of its lack of moisture.]

ʻimi  (12) 27Aia akula paha i Waikīkī i ka ʻimi ʻahuʻawa.Perhaps gone to Waikīkī to seek the ʻahuʻawa sedge.
 [Gone where disappointment is met. A play on ahu (heap) and ʻawa (sour).]
  185ʻAʻohe mea ʻimi a ka maka.Nothing more for the eyes to search for.
 [Everything one desires is in his presence.]
  235ʻAuhea nō hoʻi kou kanaka uʻi a ʻimi ʻoe i wahine nāu?Why is it that you do not show how handsome you are by seeking your own woman ?
 [A woman might say, under the same circumstances, “ʻAuhea nō hoʻi kou wahine uʻi a ʻimi ʻoe i kāne nau?’]
  311E ʻimi i ke ola ma waho.Seek life outside.
 [Consult a kahuna to see what is causing the delay in healing. Said when a person lies sick, and recovery is slow.]
  312E ʻimi wale nō i ka lua o ka ʻuwaʻu ʻaʻole e loaʻa.Seek as you will the burrow of the ʻuwaʻu, it cannot be found.
 [A boast of one’s skill in lua fighting, of the depth of one’s knowledge, or of a skill that isn’t easily acquired. A play on lua, a burrow, a pit, or an art of fighting. The burrow of the ʻuwaʻu bird is often deep. Birdcatchers inserted a piece of aerial root of the ʻieʻie, gummed at one end, to catch the fledglings.]
  424Hala ka Puʻulena aia i Hilo ua ʻimi akula iā Papalauahi.The Puʻulena breeze is gone to Hilo in search of Papalauahi.
 [Said of one who has gone away or of one who finds himself too late to do anything.]

more ʻimi
631He ʻimi aliʻi, he aliʻi nō ke loaʻa; he ʻimi kanaka, he kanaka no ke loaʻa.When a chief is sought, a chief is begotten; when a commoner is sought, a commoner is begotten.
 [A reminder to a chief seeking a mate to consider the rank of his offspring.]

ʻimina  (1) 2318Noʻeau ka hana a ka ua; akamai ka ʻimina o ka noʻonoʻo.Clever are the deeds of the rain; wise in seeking knowledge.
 [Said in admiration of a clever person.]

imu  (10) 147ʻAʻohe ʻike o ka puaʻa nona ka imu e hōʻā ʻia nei.The pig does not know that the imu is being lighted for it.
 [Said of a person who is unaware that he is being victimized.]
  227ʻAʻole i ʻenaʻena ka imu i ka māmane me ka ʻūlei, i ʻenaʻena i ka laʻolaʻo.The imu is not heated by māmane and ʻūlei wood alone, but also by the kindling.
 [To be powerful, a ruler must have the loyalty of the common people as well as the chiefs.]
  351E mānalo ka hala o ke kanaka i ka imu o ka puaʻa.The wrongs done by man are atoned for by a pig in the imu.
 [When a person has committed a wrong against others or against the gods, he makes an offering of a hog with prayers of forgiveness.]
  380E uhi wale nō ʻaʻole e nalo, he imu puhi.No matter how much one covers a steaming imu, the smoke will rise.
 [The secret will get out.]
  633He imu pale ʻole; huikau ka nohona.An uncovered oven; abiding in confusion.
 [Like an imu in which each kind of food is not set apart in its own place, but piled in helter skelter, so is a promiscuous and careless family.]
  634He imu puhi na ka lā o Kalaʻe.Kalaʻe is made a steaming oven by the sun.
 [At Kalaʻe, Molokaʻi, stood an imu that was said to have baked the rain, making it a dry place.]

more imu
1677Ke aliʻi nāna e kālua i ke poʻo i ka imu a poʻalo aʻe i nā maka.The chief who can roast the head in the imu and scoop out the eyes.
 [Said of a chief who had the power and authority to have the head of one who offended him cut off and roasted in an imu, or to order his eyes dug out. The heads were roasted and then discarded, a warning to lesser chiefs and commoners to respect their superiors.]

ʻina  (2) 114ʻĀluka ka ʻina i kai o Kamaʻole.Thick with sea urchins in the sea of Kamaʻole.
 [Applied to a person laden with somebody else’s work. A chief was once traveling along the beach at Kamaʻole, Kula, Maui. A woman, not recognizing him as a chief, asked him to carry her bundle of sea urchins, which he did. Other women came along and did likewise until the chief was loaded with them.]
  608He iʻa laka nō lā hōʻi ka ʻina.The ʻina is easily gathered.
 [A retort to a person who frequently says, “If I had this” or “If I had that.” A play on ʻina (sea egg) and inā (if).]

ʻinā  (3) 1238ʻInā e lepo ke kumu wai, e hōʻea ana ka lepo i kai.If the source of water is dirty, the muddy water will travel on.
 [Where there is evil at the source, the evil travels on.]
  1239ʻInā he moe maiʻa makehewa ka hele i ka lawaiʻa.If one dreams of bananas it is useless to go fishing.
  1241ʻInā paha he puaʻa, pau i kālua.If a pig, [you] would have heen roasted.
 [Said with laughter when a person forgets to come home on time. A straying pig can end up roasted in an imu. A common saying in Puna and eastem Kaʻū.]

ʻīnaʻi  (4) 151ʻAʻohe ʻīnaʻi komo ʻole o ka ʻai.There is no meat that doesnt taste good with poi.
 [Let it go at that. Used especially with regard to genealogy to mean: Even if one claims kinship with me, it doesn’t matter whether the connection is genuine. My life will continue; I can still eat poi.]
  635He ʻīnaʻi na ka wela a ka lā.Meat consumed by the heat of the sun.
 [Said of one who has a severe case of sunburn.]
  1347Ka iʻa kaʻa poepoe o Kalapana, ʻīnaʻi ʻuala o Kaimū.The round, rolling fish of Kalapana, to be eaten with the sweet potato of Kaimū.
 [The kukui nut, cooked and eaten as a relish. This is from a hoʻopāpā riddling chant in the story of Kaipalaoa, a boy of Puna, Hawaiʻi, who went to Kauaʻi to riddle with the experts there and won.]
  2291Nā puʻe ʻuala ʻīnaʻi o ke ala loa.The sweet-potato mounds that provide for a long journey.
 [Said of a patch of sweet potatoes whose crops are reserved for a voyage or journey.]

inaina  (5) 293E hoʻopiha i ka lua o ka inaina.Fill the pit of wrath.
 [Fill the stomach.]
  353E moni i ke koko o ka inaina, ʻumi ka hanu o ka hoʻomanawanui.Swallow the blood of wrath and hold the breath of patience.
  1606Kauhū ka ʻena o ka ukiuki na ka inaina.Annoyance gives heat to anger.
 [Annoyance easily leads to wrath.]
  1899Kū ke ʻehu o ka huhū o ka mea hale, nakeke ka ʻauwae i ka inaina.The anger of the house owner rises like the [sea] spray, and the chin rattles with wrath.
 [Said of an angry host. First uttered by Lohiʻau when he arrived at Kīlauea and encountered the wrath of Pele.]
  2832Ua nā ka lua o ka inaina.The pit of wrath is satisfied.
 [Said when one has had enough to eat.]

ʻinamona  (1) 128ʻAʻohe aʻu ʻala ʻinamona iā ʻoukou.I do not find even the fragrance of roasted kukui nuts in you.
 [I don’t find the least bit of good in you. First uttered by Pele to her sisters, who refused to go to Kauaʻi for her lover, Lohi’au.]

ʻīnana  (1) 1710Ke ʻīnana la me he ʻōpae ʻoehaʻa.Active like freshwater shrimp.
 [Said of scattered warriors who climb rocks and hillsides to escape death.]

inanu  (1) 426Halakau ka inanu i ka lāʻau.The bird perches way up high in the tree.
 [Said of a man or woman who is not easily ensnared.]

ʻiniki  (2) 636He ʻiniki me ka wawalu ka ʻeha a kamaliʻi.All the hurt that a child can infict is by pinching and scratching.
 [An expression of ridicule said to or of one considered to be no stronger than a child.]
  1345Ka iʻa ʻiniki o ka mākeke.The pinched fish of the market.
 [Fish at the market are pinched by customers to determine their freshness.]

ʻino  (40) 8Ahē nō ka manu o Kaʻula, he lā ʻino.When the birds of Kaʻula appear wild, it denotes a stormy day.
 [Signs of trouble keep people away.]
  91ʻAkahi au a ʻike i ka ʻino o Hilo.It is the first time I have seen a Hilo storm.
 [For the first time I have met with evil people who wish to harm me.]
  135ʻAʻohe e nalo ka iwi o ke aliʻi ʻino, o ko ke aliʻi maikaʻi ke nalo.The bones of an evil chief will not be concealed, but the bones of a good chief will.
 [When an evil chief died, the people did not take the trouble to conceal his bones.]
  216ʻAʻohe waʻa hoʻohoa o ka lā ʻino.No canoe is defiant on a stormy day.
 [It doesn’t pay to venture into the face of danger.]
  221ʻAʻole e ʻai ʻia he maunu ʻino.It will not be taken by the fish; it is poor bait.
 [People will pay no attention to poor production. When it is good, it will attract attention.]
  234ʻAu ana ka Lae o Maunauna i ka ʻino.Point Maunauna swims in the storm.
 [Said of a courageous person who withstands the storm of life. Point Maunauna (Battered) is at Waimea, Oʻahu, where high seas are common.]

more ʻino
271E hahai ana nō ke kolekole i kahi nui a ka wahie, a e hahai ana no ke ʻino i kahi nui o ka paʻakai.Underdone meat follows along even where wood is plentiful, and decomposition follows along even where much salt is found.
 [Even where good is found, evil creeps in.]

inoa  (7) 153ʻAʻohe inoa komo ʻole o ka ʻai.No name prevents food from entering the mouth.
 [Similar to the saying, “Sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me.”]
  514Hea ʻia mai kēia kanaka, malia he inoa i loaʻa iā ʻoe.Call an invitation to this person, perhaps you know the name.
 [A request to be called into someone’s home, usually uttered by a passing relative or friend who would like to pause and rest but is not sure that he is recognized by the others.]
  637He inoa ʻala.A fragrant name.
 [Said of a chief whose reputation is good.]
  1827Kōlea hewa i ka inoa.He cried “Plover!” over the wrong name.
 [He told untruths about someone.]
  1830Kōlea nō ke kōlea i kona inoa iho.The plover can only cry its own name.
 [Said of an egotistical person.]
  2484Ola ka inoa.The name lives.
 [Said when the name of a beloved, deceased relative is given to a child.]
  2757Pupuka auaneʻi, he inoa ʻala.Homely he may be, but his name is fragrant.
 [He bears an honorable name.]

ʻinoʻino  (2) 492Haumanumanu ka ipu ʻinoʻino.A misshapen gourd makes an ugly container.
 [Said of an ugly person. Also said in warning to a mother to be careful with the body of her baby — to mold it lest it be imperfect and ugly.]
  1435Kalaupapa ʻai ʻinoʻino.Kalaupapa of the bad food.
 [An epithet for Kalaupapa, Molokaʻi. In the early days of the leper settlement, the food situation was deplorable. Poi was floated in on the tide, and meat sometimes began to spoil before it was received.]

inu  (6) 255E ake ana e inu i ka wai hū o Koʻolihilihi.Eager to drink of the gushing spring of Koʻolihilihi.
 [Eager to make love. Koʻolihilihi (Prop-eyelashes) is a spring in Puna. When royal visitors were expected, the people attached lehua blossoms to the makaloa sedge that grew around the spring so that when their guests stooped to drink, the lehua fringes touched their cheeks and eyelashes. The last person for whom the spring was bedecked was Keohokalole, mother of Liliʻuokalani.]
  432Hālawa, inu wai kūkae.Hālawa drinker of excreta water.
 [An insult applied to the kauā of Hālawa, Molokaʻi.]
  1237I mua e nā pōkiʻi a inu i ka wai ʻawaʻawa.Forward, my younger hrothers, until you drink the bitter water [of battle].
 [Uttered by Kamehameha as he rallied his forces in the battle of ʻĪao Valley.]
  1245Inu wai kōliʻuliʻu o Hilo.Drink the waters of the distant sky in Hilo.
 [The rain of Hilo is a chief source of drinking water.]
  1711Ke inu akula paha aʻu ʻĀlapa i ka wai o Wailuku.My ʻĀlapa warriors must now be drinking the water of Wailuku.
 [Said when an expected success has turned into a failure. This was a remark made by Kalaniʻōpuʻu to his wife Kalola and son Kiwalaʻō, in the belief that his selected warriors, the ʻAlapa, were winning in their battle against Kahekili. Instead they were utterly destroyed.]
  2429ʻO ka mea ukuhi kai ʻike i ka lepo o ka wai; o ka mea inu ʻaʻole ʻo ia i ʻike.He who dips knows how dirty the water is, but he who drinks does not.
 [He who does the work knows what trouble it takes; he who receives does not.]

inuwai  (1) 475Hao ka Inuwai, maloʻo ka lau lāʻau.The Inuwai breeze blew, withering the leaves of the trees.
 [Along he came and nothing was left. The Inuwai (Drink-water) breeze is very drying.]

ʻio  (10) 638He ʻio au, ʻaʻohe lālā kau ʻole.I am a hawk; there is no branch on which I cannot perch.
 [I can go anywhere I please; I am a chief.]
  639He ʻio au, he manu i ka lewa lani.I am an ʻio, the bird that soars in the heavenly space.
 [A boast. The highest chiefs were often called ʻio (hawk), king of the Hawaiian birds.]
  640He ʻio ʻoe, he ʻio au, he ʻio nā ʻānela o ke akua, kiʻi maila nō iā ʻoe a lawe.You are a hawk, I am a hawk, and the angels of God are hawks.
 [Uttered by Hitchcock, a missionary, over the coffin of a sorcerer who had threatened to pray him to death and referred to himself as an ʻio, the bird that flies the highest.]
  641He ʻio poʻi moa.Chicken-catching hawk.
 [Said of a clever thief or of one who steals the sweetheart of another.]
  1288Kaha ka ʻio i ka mālie.The ʻio bird poises in the calm.
 [Said in admiration of a handsome person. An ʻio dips gracefully as it flies, with wings that flap slowly.]
  1412Ka ʻio nui maka lana au moku.The great ʻio with eyes that see everywhere on the land.
 [A ruling chief.]

more ʻio
1802Kinikini kauhale liʻiliʻi o lalo lilo e. "He Ahu au no Kaʻū"; "He ʻIo au no Hilo."A multitude are the small houses way down helow. [The inhabitants claim,] “I am an Ahu of Kaʻu’ and “I am an ʻIo of Hilo.”
 [This saying is used in anger or to make fun of those who are low in rank yet claim relationship with the high chiefs. A play on ahu (a heap of nothing), ʻū (a grunt of contempt) in Kaʻū, and ʻio, the mighty hawk that sits on any branch it chooses.]

ʻiʻo  (12) 302Eia ʻiʻo nō, ke kolo mai nei ke aʻa o ka wauke.Truly now, the root of the wauke creeps.
 [It was not destroyed while it was small; now it’s too big to cope with. Said by Keaweamaʻuhili’s warriors of Kamehameha. They were at the court of Alapaʻi when the order was given to “Nip off the leaf bud of the wauke plant while it is tender” [E ʻōʻū i ka maka o ka wauke oi ʻōpiopio). This attempt to kill the baby didn’t succeed, and the child grew into a powerful warrior who quelled all of his foes.]
  307Eia ʻo Kuʻiʻaki me Huanu ke hana nei i ka lāua hana o ka ʻohi ʻiʻo pūpū.Here are Kuʻiʻaki and Huanu doing their work gathering shellfish.
 [An intense cold. A play on Kuʻi-ʻaki (Gritting-the-molars) and Hu-anu (Overflowing-cold). Huanu is Hawaiian for Juan.]
  455Hana ʻiʻo ka haole!The white man does it in earnest!
 [Hawaiians were generally easygoing and didn’t order people off their lands or regard them as trespassers. When the whites began to own lands, people began to be arrested for trespassing and the lands were fenced in to keep the Hawaiians out.]
  480Hapa haole ʻiʻo ʻoniʻoni.Half-white with quivering flesh.
 [What restless, active people these part-Caucasians are!]
  737He leho hou kēia, ke ola nei nō ka ʻiʻo.This is a fresh cowry; the flesh is still alive.
 [A warning that a new idea or plan may turn out badly. When the animal in a shell dies, a stench results.]
  780He maiʻa līlā, ʻaʻohe ʻiʻo.A thin banana without substance.
 [Not worth troubling about. Maiʻa can refer to either the fruit or the plant.]

more ʻiʻo
1921Kūneki nā kūʻauhau liʻiliʻi, noho mai i lalo; hoʻokahi nō, ʻo ko ke aliʻi ke piʻi i ka ʻiʻo.Set aside the lesser genealogies and remain humble; let only one be elevated, that of the chief.
 [Boast not of your own lineage but elevate that of your chief. Said to members of the junior line of chiefs.]

ʻiole  (13) 85ʻAi nō ka ʻiole a haʻalele i kona kūkae.A rat eats, then leaves its droppings.
 [Said of an ungrateful person.]
  180ʻAʻohe mālama pau i ka ʻiole.No one who takes care of his possessions has ever found them eaten by rats.
 [When one takes care of his goods he will not suffer losses.]
  778Hemahema nō ka ʻiole, mikimiki ka ʻowau.When the rat is careless, the cat comes around.
 [Be on guard.]
  891He piko pau ʻiole.An umbilical cord taken by a rat.
 [A chronic thief. The umhilical cords of infants were taken to special places where the cords of other family members were kept for many generations. If a rat took a cord before it was hidden away safely, the child became a thief.]
  1411Ka ʻiole ʻaihue moa o Keauhou.The chicken-stealing rat of Keauhou.
 [One who steals another’s sweetheart or mate. Any place name may be used, depending on where the “rat” is from.]
  1782Ke pau ka moa, kākā i ka nuku; ke pau ka ʻiole, ahu kūkae; ke pau ka manō, lanaō i ke kai.When a chicken finishes [eating] he cleans his beak; when a rat finishes, he leaves a heap of excreta; when a shark finishes, he rises to the surface of the sea.
 [A description of the table manners of people. Some are clean like the chicken; others are unclean and careless, like the rat; and still others, like the shark, loll around without offering to help.]

more ʻiole
1822Kōkō ʻiole ka ua i ke kula.Like the rat [-gnawed] net is the rain over the plains.
 [A Kaʻū saying. Makaliʻi, an ancient chief, once gathered all the food plants in a huge net and hung it up in the sky. The result was famine. A rat volunteered to go up to see what he could do about it. He ascended a rainbow and found the net, which he chewed. Down fell the contents, everywhere. So when the rain pours over the land and plants sprout everywhere, it is compared to the gnawed net that scattered food from the hills to the sea, bringing life to all.]

ipo  (3) 1736Ke kalukalu moe ipo o Kapaʻa.The kalukalu of Kapaʻa that sleeps with the lover.
 [Lovers were said to like whiling the time in the soft kalukalu plants.]
  1910Kūkuni i kāʻili o ka ipo ahi.Burning the skin of the lovers.
 [When sparks from hurled firebrands fell near the spectators, lovers would pick them up quickly and drop them on the skin. The resulting scar was a remembrance of the event.]
  2454ʻO ke aloha o ke ipo, he wela ia nō ke kino.The love of a sweetheart is like a hot fire within the body.

ipu  (16) 155ʻAʻohe ipu ʻōpio e ʻole ka mimino i ka lā.No immature gourd can withstand withering in the sun [without care].
 [No child can get along without adult supervision.]
  492Haumanumanu ka ipu ʻinoʻino.A misshapen gourd makes an ugly container.
 [Said of an ugly person. Also said in warning to a mother to be careful with the body of her baby — to mold it lest it be imperfect and ugly.]
  642He ipu hoʻoilina mai nā kupuna mai.An inherited container from the remotest ancestress.
 [Said of the womb, the container by which the family line continues.]
  643He ipu kāʻeo.A full calabash.
 [A knowledgeable person. Also expressed ʻUmeke kaeo.]
  644He ipu pala ʻole.A calabash without a dah [of poi ] in it.
 [An ignoramus. Also expressed ʻUmeke pala ʻole.]
  831He naha ipu auaneʻi o paʻa i ka hupau humu.It isn’t a break in a gourd container that can he easily mended by sewing the parts together.
 [A broken relationship is not as easily mended as a broken gourd. Also, the breaking up of the family brought a stop to the support each gave the other.]

more ipu
965He waʻa auaneʻi ka ipu e pau ai nā pipi me nā ʻōpae.A gourd container is not a canoe to take all of the oysters and shrimps.
 [The container is not too large and cannot deplete the supply. A reply to one who views with suspicion another’s food container, or who balks at sharing what he has.]

īpuka  (1) 1874Kū i ka īpuka o ka hoka.Stands at the doorway of disappointment.

ʻīpuka  (3) 518He ʻai leo ʻole, he ʻīpuka hāmama.Food unaccompanied by a voice; a door always open.
 [Said about the home of a hospitable person. The food can be eaten without hearing a complaint from the owners, and the door is never closed to any visitor.]
  1495Kani ka moa i ka ʻīpuka, he malihini kipa.When a cock crows at the door, a guest is to he expected.
  2072Mai kīʻai a hālo wale i ko haʻi ʻīpuka o pā auaneʻi i ka leo.Do not peer or peep in the doorway of other people’s houses or you’ll be struck by the voice.
 [Mind your own business, or you’ll hear something that will hurt your feelings.]

ipukukui  (1) 1414Ka ipukukui pio ʻole i ke Kauaʻula.The light that will not go out in spite of the blowing of the Kauaʻula wind.
 [Said of the Lahainaluna School, where many leaders of old Hawaiʻi were educated.]

ʻiwa  (4) 645He ʻiwa hoʻohaehae nāulu.An ʻiwa that teases the rain clouds.
 [A beautiful maiden or handsome youth who rouses jealous envy in others.]
  1795Kīkaha ka ʻiwa he lā makani.When the ʻiwa bird soars on high it is going to be windy.
 [Said of a nice-looking, well-dressed person.]
  1796Kīkaha ka ʻiwa i nā pali.The ʻiwa hird soars over the cliff.
 [Said of a well-dressed person.]
  1979Lele ka ʻiwa mālie kai koʻo.When the ʻiwa bird flies [out to sea] the rough sea will be calm.

iwi  (24) 40Aia i ka mole kamaliʻi, ʻaʻohe i oʻo ka iwi.Still rooted in childhood when the bones have not matured.
 [Said of a person who is still a child, either physically or mentally.]
  135ʻAʻohe e nalo ka iwi o ke aliʻi ʻino, o ko ke aliʻi maikaʻi ke nalo.The bones of an evil chief will not be concealed, but the bones of a good chief will.
 [When an evil chief died, the people did not take the trouble to conceal his bones.]
  410Haʻihaʻi nā iwi o ke kolohe.Broken are the bones of the mischiefmaker.
 [Said of one who is caught in mischief and given a trouncing.]
  457Hana ka iwi a kanaka makua, hoʻohoa.First get some maturity into the bones before challenging.
  464Hānau ʻia i ka pō Lāʻau, lāʻau nā iwi, he koa.Born was he on a Lāʻau night for his bones are hard and he is fearless.
 [Said of a bold, fearless person. Lāʻau nights are a group of nights in the lunar month. The days following each of these nights are believed to be good for planting trees.]
  564He hale kipa nō lā hoʻi ko ke kōlea haʻihaʻi ʻē ʻia nā iwi.The house of a plover might have been that of a friend if one hadn’t broken his bones.
 [A stranger might have been a friend if he hadn’t been treated so shamefully.]

more iwi
597He huakaʻi paoa, he pili i ka iwi.An unlucky journey in which the body was wagered.
 [Suffering.]

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