updated: 4/13/2018

ʻŌlelo Noʻeau
Concordance

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P

pa    paa    pae    pah    pai    pak    pal    pam    pan    pao    pap    pau    paw    pe    pea    pee    peh    pek    pel    pep    peu    pi    pia    pie    pih    pii    pik    pil    pin    pio    pip    piw    po    poa    poe    poh    poi    pok    pol    pom    pon    poo    pop    pou    pu    pu    pua    pue    puh    pui    puk    pul    pum    pun    puo    pup    puu    puw    

  (31) 166ʻAʻohe komo o kā haʻi puaʻa ke paʻa i ka .Other people’s pigs would not come in if the fence were kept in good repair.
 [Be prepared always, and you’ll find yourself free of trouble. Also, evil influence cannot enter when one keeps his own mental realm fortified from within.]
  262E aʻo i ka hana o i ka leo o ka makua hūnōai.Learn to work lest you be struck by the voice of the parent-in-law.
 [Advice to a son or daughter before marriage.]
  350E mālama o i ka leo.Be careful lest you he struck by the voice.
 [Be careful not to do something that will lead to a scolding.]
  604He iʻa i i ka makau.A fish that had once taken a hook.
 [Said of a person made wary by an unpleasant experience.]
  749He lele iki kau ka manaʻo; ke aloha kamaliʻi he lālau nō.[An adult] lets his fancy take fight and touches lightly while a child lover reaches out directly.
 [An adult lover dreams, plans, and gently woos; a child is clumsy in his lovemaking.]
  750He lele iki — ke aloha kamaliʻi.A light touch — so is love among children.
 [Children may imagine themselves in love, but it is only a passing fancy — puppy love. Not so is the love of a mature person.]

more
787He makamaka, ke lā kāhea.That is a friend, for he calls out an invitation.
 [It was the custom to call out an invitation as a visitor approached.]

paʻa  (45) 100Ako ʻē ka hale a paʻa, a i ke komo ʻana mai o ka hoʻoilo, ʻaʻole e kulu i ka ua o Hilinehu.Thatch the house beforehand so when winter comes it will not leak in the shower of Hilinehu.
 [Do not procrastinate; make preparations for the future now.]
  129ʻAʻohe ʻauwaʻa paʻa i ka hālau i ka mālie.No canoes remain in the sheds in calm weather.
 [Everybody goes fishing in good weather. Also used when people turn out in great numbers to share in work or play.]
  166ʻAʻohe komo o kā haʻi puaʻa ke paʻa i ka pā.Other people’s pigs would not come in if the fence were kept in good repair.
 [Be prepared always, and you’ll find yourself free of trouble. Also, evil influence cannot enter when one keeps his own mental realm fortified from within.]
  276E hana mua a paʻa ke kahua ma mua o ke aʻo ana aku iā haʻi.Build yourself a firm foundation before teaching others.
  320E keʻekeʻehi kūlana i paʻa. ʻO ʻoe hoʻokahi, ʻo wau hoʻokahi, kū mai i mua.Take a firm stand. You, by yourself, and I, by myself, let us step forth.
 [A challenge to one to step out of a crowd and fight man to man.]
  321E kipi ana lākou nei. ʻAʻole naʻe ʻo lākou ponoʻī akā ʻo kā lākou mau keiki me nā moʻopuna. ʻO ke aliʻi e ola ana i ia wā e kū ʻōlohelohe ana ia, a ʻo ke aupuni e kūkulu ʻia aku ana, ʻo ia ke aupuni paʻa o Hawaiʻi nei.These people [the missionaries] are going to rebel; not they themselves, but their children and grandchildren. The ruler at that time will be stripped of power, and the government established then will be the permanent government of Hawaiʻi.
 [Prophesied by David Malo.]

more paʻa
334E Lēkia e, ʻonia i paʻa.O Lēkia, move that you may hold fast.
 [Make a move to give yourself a secure holel. Lēkia and Pōhaku-o-Hanalei are stones in Puna. When the demigod Kaleikini came to the district, he dug around Lēkia with the intention of toppling it off the hill. Before he could uproot it, he got hungry and departed. It was then that the other stone, Pōhaku-o-Hanalei, cried out, “E Lēkia e, ʻonia i paʻa.” Lēkia moved downward and held fast. Kaleikini tried in vain after that and was unable to remove Lēkia.]

pāʻā  (2) 875He pāʻā kō kea no Kohala, e kole ai ka waha ke ʻai.A resistant white sugar cane of Kohala that injures the mouth when eaten.
 [A person that one does not tamper with. This was the retort of Pupukea, a Hawaiʻi chief, when the Maui chief Makakuikalani made fun of liis small stature. Later used in praise of the warriors of Kohala, who were known for valor.]
  2420ʻO ka liʻiliʻi pāʻā kōkea ia Kohala, e kole ai ko nuku.It is the little white sugar stalk of Kohala that makes your mouth raw.
 [Said by Pupukea when Makakuikalani made fun of his small size. The fine, hair-like growth on stalks of sugar cane can cause irritation.]

paʻa ʻāina  (1) 1739Ke kaulana paʻa ʻāina o nā aliʻi.The famed landholders of the chiefs.
 [The best warriors were awarded the best lands by the chiefs.]

paʻa ʻole  (1) 1217I komo nō ka haʻi puaʻa i ka paʻa ʻole o ka pā.Other people’s pigs come in when the fence is not kept in good repair.
 [When you behave well and tend to your own business, no sorcerer can send his evil gods to destroy you, for your own gods will give you their protection.]

Paʻahao  (1) 341E loaʻa ana iā ʻoe ka mea a Paʻahao.Youll get what Paʻahao has.
 [Paʻahao, a native of Kaʻiā, was often teased by his neighbors because when annoyed he would snap, “Naio!” (“Pinworms!”) This amused his tormentors. When annoyed, one might say, “You’ll get what Paʻahao has.” Paʻahao lived in Waiōhinu, Kaʻū, during the late 1800s and early 1900s.]

Paʻaiea  (1) 2515ʻO nā hōkū o ka lani luna, ʻo Paʻaiea ko lalo.The stars are above, Paʻaiea helow.
 [Refers to Kamehameha’s great fish-pond, Paʻaiea, in Kona, Hawaiʻi. Its great size led to this saying — the small islets that dotted its interior were compared to the stars that dot the sky. The pond was destroyed during a volcanic eruption.]

paʻakai  (13) 271E hahai ana nō ke kolekole i kahi nui a ka wahie, a e hahai ana no ke ʻino i kahi nui o ka paʻakai.Underdone meat follows along even where wood is plentiful, and decomposition follows along even where much salt is found.
 [Even where good is found, evil creeps in.]
  754Hele nō ka pilau a ke ālia, i kahi nui o ka paʻakai.Decomposition can also he found where there is so much salt that the earth is encrusted.
 [Scandal is found even in the best of families.]
  874He paʻakai auaneʻi ke kanaka o heheʻe.Man isn’t salt that melts.
 [Said to encourage someone to venture out into the rain.]
  972He wahī paʻakai.Just a package of salt.
 [Something good; a gift of anything one has grown or made.]
  1028Hoʻi hou ka paʻakai i Waimea.The salt has gone back to Waimea.
 [Said when someone starts out on a journey and then comes back again. The salt of Waimea, Kauaʻi, is known for its reddish brown color.]
  1082Hoʻokahi no ʻōpae, ʻula ka paʻakai.One shrimp can redden the salt.
 [Said of a poor fare of food due to a bad crop. A single shrimp and some salt will do for the time being, as long as the shrimp flavors and colors the salt.]

more paʻakai
1216I komo ka ʻai i ka paʻakai.It is the salt that makes the poi go in.
 [Poi tastes much better with salted meats. If there is no meat, one can make a meal of poi and salt.]

paʻakikī  (1) 2560Paʻakikī kanaka o Kauaʻi.Tough are the men of Kauaʻi.
 [Oʻahu was once inhabited by supernatural beings who ate people. They would extend their hospitality by day, but at night they would eat their sleeping guests. A canoe came from Kauaʻi one day, and among the passengers was a man who was distrustful of the Oahuans. When the other men went to sleep, he dug a hole under the wall, crept into it, pulled a mat over himself, and waited. Late at night he listened as the hosts came and ate his companions. After the evil beings were gone, he hurried to the canoe and sailed home. He told his friends, and together they made wooden images, hid them in the canoe, and sailed for Oʻahu, where they were welcomed. That night the images were put inside the house, while the men hid outside. When the hosts came around to eat the visitors, they bit into the hard wooden images. The Kauaʻi men burned the house, thus ending the evil on Oʻahu.]

paʻapaʻaʻina  (1) 2562Paʻapaʻaʻina ka malo i loko o ʻIkuwā.The [flap of the] loincloth [flutters and] snaps in the month of ʻIkuwā.
 [ʻIkuwā is a month of rains, winds, and thunderstorms.]

paʻapaʻakai  (1) 2563Paʻapaʻakai ʻo Malama.Crusted with salt is Malama.
 [Said of a sour situation. Refers to Malama, Puna, Hawaiʻi.]

pae  (18) 146ʻAʻohe i hiki i Hakalauʻai, pae ʻē i Keolewa.Hakalauʻai was never reached, for he landed at Keolewa instead.
 [Before one could receive sufficient food for all his requirements, he found his efforts suspended. A play on Haka-lau-ʻai (Rack-for-much-food) and Ke-olewa (Suspend-in-space).]
  315E kāmau iho i ka hoe a pae aku i ke kula.Dip in the paddle till you reach the shore.
 [Keep dipping your finger into the poi until you’ve had your fill.]
  327E lauhoe mai nā waʻa; i ke kā, i ka hoe; i ka hoe, i ke kā; pae aku i ka ʻāina.Everybody paddle the canoes together; bail and paddle, paddle and bail, and the shore is reached.
 [Pitch in with a will, everybody, and the work is quickly done.]
  602He hupo no ka waʻa pae.A stupid one belonging to the canoe landing.
 [Little skill is required to get a canoe out of the water at a landing. Said of one whose knowledge is very shallow and whose skill is practically nil.]
  615He iʻa pae wale no kaʻuwīʻuwī.The ʻuwīʻuwī is a fish that washes ashore.
 [Said of a ne’er-do-well who goes from house to house and depends on others for his livelihood.]
  962He unu ʻoe no ka waʻa pae.You are a rock for beaching a canoe.
 [You are worth nothing but to be stepped on.]

more pae
1242I noho ʻoukou a i pae mai he waʻa o Kahiki-makolena, hopu ʻoukou a paʻa; o ke kahuna ia ʻaʻohe e ʻeha ka ʻili ʻoiai no Kahiki aku ana ka ʻāina.If sometime in the future a canoe from Kahiki-makolena arrives, grasp and hold fast to it. There is the kahuna for you, and your skins will never more he hurt [in war],for the land will someday he owned hy Kahiki.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kaleikuahulu to Kaʻahumanu and her sisters as he was dying. Foreign priests (missionaries) will come. Accept their teachings.]

pae kō  (2) 1171I ʻike ʻia nō ʻo Kohala i ka pae kō, a ʻo ka pae kō ia kole ai ka waha.One can recognize Kohala by her rows of sugar cane which can make the mouth raw when chewed.
 [When one wanted to fight a Kohala warrior, he would have to be a very good warrior to succeed. Kohala men were vigorous, brave, and strong.]

pae puʻu  (1) 21Ahuwale nā pae puʻu o Hāʻupukele.The row of Hāʻupukele’s hills are in full view.
 [Said of anything that is exposed or very obvious.]

paea  (1) 431Hālāwai ke kila me ka paea.Steel and flint meet.
 [When steel and flint come together, sparks result; so it is with two persons who cannot get along.]

paeaea  (1) 776He luʻu no ke kai paeaea, ʻaʻohe he luʻu no kai mālolo.[He is] a diver of the sea where pole fishing is done and not a diver of the sea where fiying fishes are caught.
 [He does have some knowledge but it is not deep enough to show greater skill.]

pāʻele  (2) 1006Hilo pāʻele kū.Hilo is dark all over.
 [The rain, mist, and mud make Hilo dark.]
  2565Pāʻele kū lani.The chiefy blackening.
 [This expression, used in chants and songs, refers to the tattooing of Kahekili, ruler of Maui. Because he was named for the god of thunder, who was believed to be black on one side of his body, Kahekili had himself tattooed on one side from head to foot.]

paepae  (2) 1914Kūlia i ka nuʻu, i ka paepae kapu o Līloa.Strive to reach the summit, to the sacred platform of Līloa.
 [Strive to do your best.]
  2602Papani ka uka o Kapela; puaʻi hānono wai ʻole o Kukaniloko; pakī hunahuna ʻole o Holoholokū; ʻaʻohe mea nāna e ʻaʻe paepae kapu o Līloa.Close the upland of Kapela; no red water gushes from Kukaniloko; not a particle issues from Holoholokū; there is none to step over the sacred platform of Līloa.
 [The old chiefs and their sacredness are gone; the descendants are no longer laid to rest at Ka-pela-kapu-o-Kakaʻe at ʻīao; the descendants no longer point to Kukaniloko on Oʻahu and Holoholokū on Kauaʻi as the sacred birthplaces; there is no one to tread on the sacred places in Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, where Līloa once dwelt.]

paepae wāwae  (1) 876He paepae wāwae koʻu ʻili no kona kapuaʻi.My skin is like the soles of his feet.
 [An expression of humbleness acknowledging the superiority of another.]

paha  (25) 26Aia akula paha i Kiolakaʻa.Perhaps it is gone to Kiolakaʻa.
 [Gone to the place of thrown-away things. Used when something is thrown away and later wanted. A play on kiola, to throw away. Kiolakaʻa is a place in Kaʻū.]
  27Aia akula paha i Waikīkī i ka ʻimi ʻahuʻawa.Perhaps gone to Waikīkī to seek the ʻahuʻawa sedge.
 [Gone where disappointment is met. A play on ahu (heap) and ʻawa (sour).]
  28Aia aku nei paha i Kaiholena.Perhaps gone to Kaiholena.
 [Perhaps gone to loaf somewhere. A play on lena (lazy).]
  74Aia paha iā Lima-ʻāpā.Perhaps Touch-hand has taken it.
 [Somebody with very quick hands must have taken it.]
  200ʻAʻohe paha he ʻuhane.Perhaps [he has] no soul.
 [Said of one who behaves in a shameful manner.]
  256ʻEā! Ke kau mai nei ke ao panopano i uka. E ua mai ana paha.Say! A black cloud appears in the upland. Perhaps it is going to rain.
 [A favorite joke uttered when a black-skinned person is seen.]

more paha
581He hoa ʻai waiū paha no Kauahoa.Perhaps he shared the breast with Kauahoa.
 [Said of one who is indifferent to the problems of others. A play on uahoa (hard) in Kauahoa, a warrior of Kauaʻi.]

Pāhala  (2) 1565Ka ua kau lāʻau o Pāhala.The tree-resting rain of Pāhala.
 [The rain of Pāhala in Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi, seems to rest on the tree tops.]
  2567Pāhala, ka ʻāina lepo haʻaheo i ka maka.Pāhala, land [of those who are] proud of the dust in the faces.
 [The people of Pāhala, Kaʻū, like others of that district, are proud of their home, even though the wind-blown dust keeps their faces dirty.]

pahaʻoe  (1) 2137Manaʻo pahaʻoe i kaʻeleʻele o kuʻu kuʻemaka he kauā au nāu?Do you think that because my eyebrows are black I am your servant?
 [Said in annoyance by one who is asked to do distasteful work. Kauā were sometimes identifiable by the black tattoos on their foreheads.]

pahapaha  (2) 2011Limu pahapaha nolu i ke kai.Sea lettuce, easily swayed by the action of the tide.
 [A derogatory expression for a person weak of character or physical ability.]
  2568Pahapaha lei o Polihale.The pahapaha lei of Polihale.
 [At Polihale, Kauaʻi, grew pahapaha (sea lettuce). Visitors gathered and wore this pahapaha in lei because its green color could be revived by immersion in sea water after it had partially dried. Although pahapaha is common everywhere, only that which grows at Polihale revives once it is dry. It is famed in songs and chants of Kauaʻi.]

paheʻe  (4) 859He ʻōlali ia he iʻa paheʻe.It is an ʻōlali fish, a slippery one.
 [Said of a person who is too wily and wise to be caught.]
  2313Niʻihau i ka uhi paheʻe.Niʻihau of the slippery yam.
 [The island of Niʻihau was noted for its fine yams. When grated raw for medicine, yams are very slippery and tenacious.]
  2433ʻO ka papa heʻe nalu kēia, paheʻe i ka nalu haʻi o Makaiwa.This is the surfboard that will glide on the rolling surf of Makaiwa.
 [A woman’s boast. Her beautiful body is like the surf board on which her mate “glides over the rolling surf.”]
  2569Paheʻe loa akula i ka welowelo.Slipped away — off to flutter in the breeze.
 [Said of one who missed by a wide margin, whose aim was very poor.]

Pahia  (1) 70"Aia nō i ʻō," wahi ʻo Pahia.“Yet to come,” says Pahia.
 [To be returned in kind later. Pahia, an honest, kindly native of Hilo, always noticed what was given him and always said in gratitude, “Yet to come, says Pahia,” meaning that he would respond in kind. People noticed that when he was given pork, he gave pork in return, and he served fish to those from whom he received fish. His friends and their friends learned to say, “ʻYet to come,’ says Pahia,” when they intended to return a kind favor.]

pāhiʻuhiʻu  (1) 1192I ka pāhiʻuhiʻu.To play the game of pāhiʻuhiʻu.
 [A saucy retort when asked, “Where are you going?” It is a play on hiʻu, which is a part of ʻohiʻu (to pry). Hence, a way of reminding the questioner that he is prying.]

Pāhoa  (1) 1582Ka ua Līhau o Pāhoa.The Līhau rain of Pāhoa.
 [The icy cold rain of Pāhoa, Puna, Hawaiʻi.]

pāhoehoe  (1) 2417ʻO ka lā ko luna, o ka pāhoehoe ko lalo.The sun above, the smooth lava below.
 [Said of a journey in which the traveler suffers the heat of the sun above and the reflected heat from the lava bed helow.]

pahu  (6) 877He pahu nā aliʻi, a pā ʻia kani.A chief is like a drum; there is no sound unless played upon.
 [Chiefs seldom stir to action unless incited by others.]
  1069Hoʻokahi kī, ʻelua pahu.One key, two trunks.
 [A reference to children of the same father and different mothers. ʻElua ki, hoʻokāhi pahu (two keys, one trunk) implies that they have the same mother but diflferent fathers.]
  1189I kani nō ka pahu i ka ʻolohaka o loko.It is the space inside that gives the drum its sound.
 [It is the empty-headed one who does the most talking.]
  1496Kani ka pahu, holo ke kao.The drum is sounded, the goat flees.
 [A humorous expression applied to a bald-headed man whose bare head is likened to a drum.]
  2570Pahu kani.Sounding drum.
 [A humorous epithet for a bald head. The skin-covered dome looks like a drum on which the skin is pulled taut and no hair grows. Also called pahu hinuhinu (shiny drum).]
  2571Paʻi ana nā pahu a hula leʻa; ʻo kaʻu hula nō kēia.Let the better-enjoyed hula chanters beat their own drums; this is the hula chant that I know.
 [A retort: Let those who claim to know a lot produce their knowledge; this is what I know.]

pahu kapu  (1) 2283pahu kapu a Laʻamaikahiki, ʻŌpuku lāua ʻo Hāwea.The sacred drums of Laʻamaikahiki — ʻŌpuku and Hāwea.
 [These were the drums brought by Laʻamaikahiki from the South Sea.]

pahulu  (3) 99ʻAkekeke kiʻo pahulu.ʻAkekeke that excretes in worn-out food patches.
 [An expression of contempt referring to an idle vagabond who eats and departs, thinking nothing of those who have helped him. The ʻakekeke, or ruddy turnstone, is a winter visitor to Hawaiʻi.]
  982He weke, he iʻa pahulu.It is a weke, the fish that produces nightmares.
 [The head of the weke fish is said to contain something that produces nightmares. The nearer to Lānaʻi the fish is caught, the worse the effects of the nightmares. Pahulu was the chief of evil beings (akua) who peopled the island of Lānaʻi. When Kaululaʻau, son of Kakaʻalaneo, ruler of Maui, was a boy, he was banished to Lānaʻi because of his mischief. By trickery, he rid the island of evil beings, and the spirit of Pahulu fled to the sea and entered a weke fish. From that time on, nightmares have been called pahulu, and a person who has had a nightmare is said to have been under the influence of Pahulu.]
  2689Pō nā maka i ka noe, i ka pahulu i ke ala loa.The eyes are blinded by the mist that haunts the long trail.
 [Said of one who is deceived.]

pahuna  (1) 201ʻAʻohe pahuna ihe hala a ka Maluakele.The Maluakele wind never misses with its spear-like thrusts.
 [Said in praise of one who always gets what he is after.]

paʻi  (8) 31Aia a paʻi ʻia ka maka, haʻi ʻia kupuna nāna ʻoe.Only when your face is slapped should you tell who your ancestors are.
 [Hawaiians were taught never to boast of illustrious ancestors. But when one is slandered and called an offspring of worthless people, he should mention his ancestors to prove that the statement is wrong.]
  190ʻAʻohe mea nāna e paʻi i ke poʻo.No one to slap his head.
 [He has no equal in his accomplishments.]
  1901Kū ke paʻi, hana ka hāʻawe.A big heap that requires carrying on the back.
 [A heap of work.]
  2571Paʻi ana nā pahu a hula leʻa; ʻo kaʻu hula nō kēia.Let the better-enjoyed hula chanters beat their own drums; this is the hula chant that I know.
 [A retort: Let those who claim to know a lot produce their knowledge; this is what I know.]
  2572Paʻi a paʻi; like a like.A slap and a slap; equal to equal.
 [A tie. Also, when agreement is reached as to the terms of a game, a contestant holds out his hand to be gently slapped by his opponent, then the opponent holds out his hand to be slapped. This clinches the terms, and the game begins.]
  2843Ua paʻi a paʻi ma ka hana.Equals in working.

paʻi ʻai  (1) 416Hakē ka paʻi ʻai o ka Malulani.The Malulani is overloaded with bundles of hard poi.
 [An impolite reference to a pregnant woman. The Malulani was an inter-island ship.]

paʻi wale  (1) 772He lolo nō a he lolo, paʻi wale.One is from the zenith, the other is from the zenith; therefore equals.
 [They are equally high in rank.]

paia  (3) 1139Huli ke alo i ka paia.Turn the face to the wall.
 [There is nothing to fear. To go to sleep with one’s face to the wall is an indication of confidence in one’s safety.]
  2655Pili pū i ka paia.Pressed hard against the wall.
 [Deep in trouble.]
  2749Puna paia ʻala i ka hala.Puna, with walls fragrant with pandanus blossoms.
 [Puna, Hawaiʻi, is a place of hala and lehua forests. In olden days the people would stick the bracts of hala into the thatching of their houses to bring some of the fragrance indoors.]

Pāʻia  (1) 1459Ka makani hāpala lepo o Pāʻia.Dust-smearing wind of Paia.
 [Pāʻia, Maui, is a dusty place.]

Paiahaʻa  (2) 2472ʻO Kuaʻana ka nalu; ʻo Paiahaʻa ka ʻāina.Kuaʻana is the surf; Paiahaʻa the land.
 [Proud were the people of Kaʻū of the surf of Kuaʻana, where chiefs used to ride the waves to the shore of Paiaha’a.]
  2530ʻO Paiahaʻa ka ʻāina, ʻo Kuaʻana ka nalu.Paiahaʻa was the land, Kuaʻana the surf.
 [Paiahaʻa was a beach near Kaumaea, Kaʻū, Hawai’i. Here the dust that clung to the skin at Kaumaea was washed off by the surf of Kuaʻana. The inner surf, Kaina (Little Brother), was the place for children to surf, and the outer surf, Kuaʻana (Big Brother), was for grown-ups.]

Paʻiakuli  (1) 2391ʻO ʻIkuwā ke kāne, ʻo Paʻiakuli ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he leo nui.ʻIkuwā is the husband, Paʻia-kuli (Deafening-noise) is the wife; a child born to them is loud of voice.
 [Said of a child born in the month of ʻIkuwā.]

paiʻea  (2) 2150Maunu paiʻea.Bait of paiʻea crab.
 [Angry words coming out of the mouth. When a fisherman went out to sea he sometimes chewed crabs and spewed them into the water to attract fish.]
  2573Paiʻea noho i ka māwae.Paiʻea crab that hides in a fissure.
 [Said of a person who is too bashful to meet strangers.]

Paʻieʻie  (1) 2025Luhe i ka wai o Pāʻieʻie.Drooped over the pool of Pāʻieʻie.
 [Drunk.]

paʻihi  (1) 2574Paʻihi ʻoe lā, lilo i ka wai, ʻaʻohe ʻike iho i ka hoa mua.Well adorned are you, borne along by the water, no longer recognizing former friends.
 [Said of one who grows proud with prosperity and looks down on his friends of less prosperous days. There is a play on wai (water). When doubled — waiwai — it refers to prosperity.]

Paikaka  (2) 1728Ke kai leo nui o Paikaka.The loud-voiced sea of Paikaka.
 [Paikaka is in Hilo.]
  2826Ua malino ke kai o Paikaka.The sea of Paikaka is calm.
 [All is peaceful now, for wrath is gone.]

paila  (1) 1892Kū ka paila, hana ka hāʻawe.A pile has accumulated; now to carry the load.
 [Said of a big accumulation of work that requires effort to clear up. Paila is Hawaiianized from the English “pile.”]

Pailolo  (1) 2200Nā ʻale hānupanupa o Pailolo.The choppy billows of Pailolo.
 [Pailolo is the channel between Oʻahu and Molokaʻi.]

paio  (1) 2258Nā makani paio lua o Kawaihae.The two conflicting winds of Kawaihae.
 [Refers to the Mumuku wind from the uplands and the Naulu wind, which brings the rains to Kawaihae.]

paʻipaʻi  (1) 2577Paʻipaʻi ka lima, ʻae ka waha.The hand applauds, the mouth assents.
 [Said of one who offers verbal approval yet does nothing to help.]

pāipu  (1) 1129Huihui pāipu a Lono.Lono’s cluster of gourd vessels.
 [Lono was a woman who had a large family of children and an indolent, pleasure-seeking husband. Hers was a life of drudgery. Tired of it, she sought a home on the sun. But when she tried to go up to it, she grew so uncomfortably warm that she came down again. Then she tried to go to a star, but the twinkling of the stars made her feel that they were laughing at her plight. Then, when the full moon rose, she changed her children into gourds and traveled up a rainbow toward the moon. Her husband saw her and ran to grasp her ankle as she went up. Her foot slipped off like a lizard’s tail. So Lono entered the moon and remained there. On full-moon nights, the people would point out the shadows in the moon and say, “There is Lono and her gourds.” Today a mother who goes about with her flock of children is compared to Lono and her gourds.]

paka  (2) 1490Ka mū ʻai paka o Puʻunui.The tobacco-eating bug of Puʻunui.
 [Said of one who is a pest. Puʻunui is now a part of Honoluiu.]
  2471ʻO Kona i ka paka ʻona — ke haʻu iho ʻoe kūnewanewa.Kona of the potent tohacco — a draw would make one stagger.
 [Kona is said to be a land of potent lovemaking.]

paka ua  (1) 459Hana ka uluna i ka paka ua.Prepare the pillow when the raindrops appear.
 [Get ready for a period of rest. When a storm came, farming and fishing were suspended and the worker remained at home, either resting or doing little chores.]

Pakaʻalana  (2) 627He iki nīoi no Pakaʻalana.A small nīoi of Pakaʻalana.
 [A small but very powerful person. The nīoi, the ʻohe, and the kauila were the kinds of trees entered by the poison gods Kāneikaulanaʻula and Kahuilaokalani, and Kapo, a goddess, at Maunaloa, Molokaʻi. The trees were later cut down and made into images.]
  1501Ka nīoi wela o Pakaʻalana.The burning nīoi of Pakaʻalana.
 [Refers to the heiau of Pakaʻalana in Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi. The timber used about the doorway was of nioi wood. According to ancient legend, the nīoi, ʻohe, and kauila trees on Molokaʻi are said to be possessed by poison gods and are regarded as having mana. To tamper with the trees or the wood, especially in places of worship, is to invite serious trouble.]

pākaʻawili  (2) 703He koali, he pākaʻawili.He is like a morning-glory vine, twisting this way and that.
 [Said of an unstable, changeable person who says one thing now and another thing later.]
  2342Nona ka ʻūmiʻi lauwili i ka pākaʻawili.His is the tie that is twisted and entangled into one that holds fast.
 [His ancestors have intermarried and re-intermarried to preserve the bloodline of his family. He is therefore of a very high and kapu rank.]

pākahi  (2) 162ʻAʻohe kana mai o ka holo o ka lio ia Hanalē; pākahi a ka lio, pālua a ka lio.How Henry made the horses run; one on a horse or two on a horse.
 [How hunger (Henry) made the fingers work in conveying poi to the mouth — with one fmger and with two.]
  2578Pākahi ka nehu a Kapiʻioho.The nehu of Kapiioho are divided, one to a person.
 [Kapiʻioho, ruler of Molokaʻi, had two ponds, Mauʻoni and Kanahā, built on his land at Kahului, Maui. The men who were brought from Molokaʻi and Oʻahu to build the ponds were fed on food brought over from Molokaʻi. The drain on that island was often so great that the men were reduced to eating nehu fish, freshwater ʻōpae and poi. The saying is used when poi is plentiful but fish is scarce and has to be carefully rationed.]

pakali  (1) 1223I laka nō ka uhu i ka pakali.The uhu is attracted by the decoy.
 [If one wants to attract a person he must have something to interest him. Be patient and you will get what you want.]

Pākē  (1) 2581Pākē kini kākai.Chinese with a handled pail.
 [Said in fun of the Chinese, for many of them were salesmen, going about from place to place with pails of goods.]

pakela  (1) 223ʻAʻole e kū ka ikaika i kēia pakela nui; ke pōʻai mai nei ka ʻohu ma uka, ma kai, ma ʻō a ma ʻaneʻi.One cannot show his strength against such odds; the rain clouds are circling from the upland, the lowland, and from all sides.
 [Said by Maheleana, a warrior of Kualiʻi, when he saw his small company surrounded by the enemy.]

pakele  (1) 183ʻAʻohe manu noho i ka lipo e pakele i ke kāpiʻo.No bird of the deep forest can escape his snare.
 [Said of a person who can win the love of anyone he chooses.]

pakī  (7) 267E ʻau mālie i ke kai pāpaʻu, o pakī ka wai a pula ka maka.Swim quietly in shallow water lest it splash into the eyes.
 [A cautioning to go carefully where one isn’t sure of conditions.]
  1413Kai pakī o Maunalua.The spraying sea of Maunalua [Oʻahu].
  2271Nānā nō a ka ʻulu i pakī kēpau.Look for the gummy breadfruit.
 [Advice to a young girl — Look for a man who has substance, like gummy breadfruit, which is a sign of maturity.]
  2583Pakī ke kuha!Saliva spatters!
 [Said of a person who scolds.]
  2584Pakī kēpau, oʻo ka ʻulu.When the gum appears on the skin, the breadfruit is matured.
 [An observation. Also said when a young person begins to think seriously of gaining a livelihood — he is maturing.]
  2602Papani ka uka o Kapela; puaʻi hānono wai ʻole o Kukaniloko; pakī hunahuna ʻole o Holoholokū; ʻaʻohe mea nāna e ʻaʻe paepae kapu o Līloa.Close the upland of Kapela; no red water gushes from Kukaniloko; not a particle issues from Holoholokū; there is none to step over the sacred platform of Līloa.
 [The old chiefs and their sacredness are gone; the descendants are no longer laid to rest at Ka-pela-kapu-o-Kakaʻe at ʻīao; the descendants no longer point to Kukaniloko on Oʻahu and Holoholokū on Kauaʻi as the sacred birthplaces; there is no one to tread on the sacred places in Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, where Līloa once dwelt.]
  2727Pūkākā nā lehua o Mānā, ʻauwana wale iho nō i ka ʻauwai pakī.Scattered are the warriors of Mānā, who go wandering along the ditch that holds little water.
 [A boast after winning a battle.]

pākiʻi  (1) 2582Pākiʻi moe one.Flounder that sleeps in the sand.
 [A term applied jokingly to a flat-nosed person. The pākiʻi is a flat fish whose coloring is like the sand in which it hides.]

pakika  (1) 765He limu ke aloha, he pakika i ke one o Mahamoku.Love is like the slippery moss on the sand of Mahamoku.
 [One can fall in love before he realizes it.]

pākiko  (1) 912He pono ka pākiko ma mua o ka hoʻokelakela wale aku.Better to be economical than too liberal.

Pākīpika  (1) 1445Ka liona o ka Pākīpika.The lion of the Pacific.
 [Kamehameha I.]

pakū  (1) 2121Mālama o pakū ke au.Take care not to break the gall bladder.
 [Watch that you do not do anything to cause bitterness.]

pākū  (1) 1924pākū ka pali o Nihoa i ka makani.The clff of Nihoa stands as a resistance against the wind.
 [Said of one who stands bravely in the face of misfortune.]

pākuʻikuʻi  (1) 2724Pūʻiwa i ka lāʻau pākuʻikuʻi a ka lawaiʻa.Frightened by the splashing stick of the fisherman.
 [Said of those who are suddenly frightened and flee in panic, like fish driven into the net by the stick that beats the water.]

pala  (14) 154ʻAʻohe i pala ke kope.The coffee berries arent ripe yet.
 [Said to or about a child who is not old enough to attract the opposite sex.]
  723He lau maiʻa pala ka wahine, hou aku nō ʻoe, pōhae.A woman is like a yellowed banana leaf that tears when one pokes at it.
 [A woman does not have the strength of a man.]
  1063Hoʻohui ʻāina pala ka maiʻa.Annexation [is] ripe bananas.
 [A saying that cropped up when talk of the annexation of Hawaiʻi began. It was a sign of bad luck to encounter someone with a bunch of bananas while on a business trip. Hence this warning that annexation will bring bad luck to Hawaiʻi.]
  2369ʻO Hinaiaʻeleʻele ka malama, ʻāluka ka pala a ka ʻōhiʻa.Hinaiaʻeleʻele is the month when the mountain apples open everywhere.
  2421ʻO ka līlā maiʻa ia o ka ʻeʻa, ʻaʻole e pala i ke anahulu.A tall banana in a mountain patch whose fruit does not open in ten days.
 [A boast of his own height by Makakuikalani, chief of Maui, when Pupukea of Hawaiʻi made fun of his being so tall and thin.]
  2546O Waiōhinu aku ia kahi o ka maiʻa pala.That is Waiōhinu, where ripe bananas are.
 [A Kaʻū saying meaning that one is in for bad luck. To see bananas while on a fishing or business trip was an omen of failure. From the story of twin brothers who were climbing a hill. The stronger brother climbed on while the weaker one sat and cried. The older looked down and said “Cry, baby, cry! Go to Waiōhinu to eat ripe bananas.”]

more pala
2585Pala ʻaluʻalu ka ʻai a kamaliʻi.Mostly peel when matured are the crops of children.
 [Children, lacking the strength of adults, are not successful farmers.]

pala naio  (2) 15Ahu ka pala naio.A heap of excretal residue where pinworms are found.
 [A rude remark. Said of something unworthy of attention or to show disbelief in a statement.]
  202ʻAʻohe pala naio.There isn’t even any excretal residue to feed a pinworm with.
 [It is not worth anything.]

pala ʻole  (1) 644He ipu pala ʻole.A calabash without a dah [of poi ] in it.
 [An ignoramus. Also expressed ʻUmeke pala ʻole.]

palaʻai  (2) 1163Iho ihola ka puna palaʻai.Down goes the pumpkin spoon.
 [Said in derision to one who pouts, whose pouting lips are compared to a spoon.]
  2537ʻOpū palaʻai.Pumpkin stomach.
 [Said in ridicule of one with a large, protruding abdomen.]

pālaha  (1) 1631Kaunaʻoa pālaha kukui o Kamehaʻikana.The kaunaʻoa that spreads and fattens the kukui foliage of Kamehaʻikana.
 [Said of kaunaoa niālolo, which grows so thickly in some places that it covers the leaves of kukui and other trees.]

Palahemo  (2) 1610Kaʻū, i Palahemo.In Kaʻū, at Palahemo.
 [Palahemo is a pool near Kalae in Kaʻū. Salt water is found under the fresh water, and any disturbance, like the dropping of a heavy stone, reverses the water, so that the salt water rises to the top. This place is famed in songs and chants.]
  1695Ke hele maila ko Kaʻū; he iho maila ko Palahemo; he hōkake aʻela i Manukā; haele loa akula i Kaleinapueo.There come those of Kaʻū; those of Palahemo descend; those of Manukā push this way and that; and away they all go to Kaleinapueo.
 [Said when one tries to find out something about another and meets with failure at every turn. A play on place names: ʻū (a grunt of contempt) in Kaʻū; hemo (to get away) in Palahemo; kā (to run along like a vine) in Manukā; and leinapueo (owl’s leaping place) in Kaleinapueo.]

palahī  (1) 2046"Mai hea mai ʻoe?" “Mai Kona mai.” “Pehea ka ua o Kona?” “Palahī puaʻa ka ua o Kona.” “A pehea ke aku?” “Hī ka pā, hī ka malau.”“Where are you from?” “From Kona.” “How is the rain of Kona?” “The rain of Kona pours like the watery excreta of a hog.” “How are the aku fish?” “They run loose from the hook and the bait carrier.”
 [Said in fun of one suffering from loose bowels. Once, a chief was out relieving himself when his bowels were very loose. A runner came by the little-traveled path through the underbrush and seeing the chief there extended his greetings. The chief began to ask questions, which the runner answered. When the chief went home he told those of his household of the abundance of rain and the run of fish in Kona. His servant, whose curiosity was roused, asked, “What were you doing at the time?” “I was excreting, and my bowels were loose,” answered the chief. “He wasn’t talking about the rain and fish,” said the servant, “he was talking about you.” The chief was angry when he heard this, but it was too late to do anything about it.]

palaholo  (1) 2625Pepeʻe a palaholo.A rolled-up frond — paste for tapa cloth.
 [Said of the ʻamaʻu fern, which furnishes sap used in tapa-making. Implies the same thought as the saying, “Great oaks from little acorns grow.”]

palahuli  (2) 712He kumu kukui palahuli wale i ka makani Kona.A kukui tree, easily toppled over by the Kona wind.
 [Said of one who is easily vanquished by a stronger opponent.]
  2586Palahuli i lalo ka waha ʻai ai.Turned down is the mouth he eats food with.
 [He has more problems than he knows what to do with.]

palai  (2) 433Halemano honi palai o uka.Halemano smells the ferns of the upland.
 [At Halemano, Oʻahu, the breezes bring the fragrance of ferns from the upland.]
  2917Wai peʻepeʻe palai o Waiakekua.The water of Waiakekua that plays hide-and-seek among the ferns.
 [Waiakekua is in Mānoa.]

palaka  (1) 1925palaka ka wai o Welokā.The water of Welokā is blocked.
 [Said of a person who has lost interest or becomes inactive, or of a situation that is at a standstill.]

palakahē  (1) 2590Palakahē ka ʻai o Makaʻukiu.Spoiled rotten are the food crops of Makaʻukiu.
 [Said of anything that is rotting, or of destruction, or of death in battle.]

palakī  (1) 2592Palakī a Moemoe.Ti daubs of Moemoe.
 [Excrement. Ti eaten in great quantity loosens the bowels. Moemoe was a prophet whose excrement, when questioned, was said to reply of his whereabouts.]

palani  (1) 495Hauna ke kai o ka palani.The palani makes a strong-smelling soup.
 [A person of unsavory reputation imparts it to all he does.]

palaoa  (1) 248E aha ʻia ana o Hakipuʻu i ka palaoa lāwalu ʻono a Kaʻehu?What is happening to Hakipuu, with dough cooked in ti leaves, of which Kaehu is so fond?
 [This is a line of a chant composed by Kaʻehu, a poet and hula instructor from Kauaʻi. It refers to a part-white woman with whom he flirted. Used in humor when referring to Hakipuʻu, a place on the windward side of Oʻahu.]

palaoa pae  (1) 2505ʻO luna, ʻo lalo; ʻo uka, ʻo kai; ʻo ka palaoa pae, no ke aliʻi ia.Above, helow; the upland, the lowland; the whale that washes ashore — all belong to the chief.
 [The chief owned everything in the land he ruled. Ivory obtained from the teeth of whales that washed ashore was very valuable.]

palapaʻa  (1) 2244Nā kūmau palapaʻa o Naʻalehu, ʻo ia mau nō ka pāpaʻa.The thick-walled calabashes of Naʻalehu are always crusted [with dried poi].
 [A Kaʻū saying — the thick-headed natives of Naʻalehu are strict adherents to principles.]

palapala  (3) 553He aupuni palapala koʻu; ʻo ke kanaka pono ʻo ia koʻu kanaka.Mine is the kingdom of education; the righteous man is my man.
 [Uttered by Kamehameha III.]
  1071Hoʻokahi no hana a Palapala ʻo ka ʻohi i ka iʻa.All that Palapala does is gather fish.
 [Although we do all the hard work, another comes along and reaps the harvest. Palapala was a noted warrior of Kāʻanapali, Maui. When the fishermen went deep-sea fishing with hook and line, he accompanied them. Whenever a fish would become unfastened and float to the surface, Palapala would take it, uttering these words.]
  2372ʻOhi wale ka iʻa a Palapala.Palapala merely takes the fish.
 [Said when a person who does nothing profits from the labor of others. Palapala was a lazy fellow who did no fishing himself but knew the ancient rule about fish caught in a net: when a net full of fish was drawn ashore, no one — child or adult — was rebuked when he picked out a fish for himself. Nobody minded that Palapala often took fish, but his boast ʻOhi wale ka iʻa a Palapala annoyed them.]

pālau  (1) 829He moʻopuna na Pālau o Hamohamo.A grandchild of Pālau, resident of Hamohamo.
 [A braggart. A play on Pālau (Idle talk) and Hamohamo (Flatter).]

pālaulau moena  (1) 878He pālaulau moena.A small mat.
 [Said of one who is of very low rank — like a floor mat.]

Pālawai  (1) 1564Ka ua kapuaʻi kanaka o Pālawai.The rain of Pālāwai [which sounds like] human footsteps.

palaweka  (1) 2527ʻO ʻOlepau ka mahina; ʻo palaweka ka mahina; ʻo hina wale ka mahina; ʻo hāhā pōʻele ka mahina.ʻOlepau is the moon phase; hazy is the light of the moon; quickly goes the light of the moon; one gropes in the dark.
 [Said of one who is vague or hazy in explaining his thoughts, or of one whose knowledge is vague.]

pale  (5) 633He imu pale ʻole; huikau ka nohona.An uncovered oven; abiding in confusion.
 [Like an imu in which each kind of food is not set apart in its own place, but piled in helter skelter, so is a promiscuous and careless family.]
  939He puʻu pale ia lae na ka hoʻokele.The cape is just something to be passed by the canoeman.
 [A boast — difficulties are mere trifles to an expert.]
  2083Mai pale i ke aʻo a ka makua.Do not set aside the teachings of a parent.
  2594Pale hāliʻi moena.A mat cover.
 [A low commoner.]
  2845Ua pale ka pono.Success was warded off.
 [Said of one who has failed.]

pale kai  (1) 2622Peʻe kua o Kaʻulahaimalama; o Kekūhaupiʻo ka makua; hilinaʻi aʻe i ka pale kai, kālele moku aʻe ma hope.Kaʻulahaimalama is secretive; Kekūhaupiʻo (Stands-leaning) is her father; she leans against the canoe side and rests against the back of the canoe.
 [Said of one who tries to conceal the true offender by pretending to know nothing.]

pale lauʻī  (1) 370E pale lauʻī i ko akua ke hiki aku i Kona.Place a shield of ti leaves before your god when you arrive in Kona.
 [A message sent by Kaʻahumanu to Liholiho requesting him to free the kapu of his god Kūkāʻilimoku. Kaʻahumanu was at that time striving to abolish the kapu system.]

palemo  (1) 2377ʻŌhua palemo.Slippery ʻōhua.
 [A term for uhu spawn. When applied to a person it means a slick, clever fellow who gets away with mischief.]

palena  (1) 244A waho au o ka poe pele, pau kou palena e ka hoa.After I’ve passed the bell buoy, your limit is reached, my dear.
 [A sailor’s saying used in an old hula song. When the ship passes the bell buoy on its way out to sea, the girl on the shore is forgotten.]

pali  (63) 22Ahuwale nā pali kahakai o Kamilo.Exposed are the sea cliffs at Kamilo Beach.
 [Said of a woman who sits carelessly and exposes herself. Kamilo Beach is in Kaʻū.]
  64ʻAi a manō, ʻaʻohe nānā i kumu pali.When the shark eats, he never troubles to look toward the foot of the cliff.
 [Said of a person who eats voraciously with no thought of those who provided the food, shows no appreciation for what has been done for him, nor has a care for the morrow.]
  164ʻAʻohe kio pōhaku nalo i ke alo pali.On the slope of a cliff, not one jutting rock is hidden from sight.
 [All is distinctly seen or known; there isn’t any use in being secretive or finding a place to hide.]
  197ʻAʻohe o kahi nānā o luna o ka pali; iho mai a lalo nei; ʻike i ke au nui ke au iki, he alo a he alo.The top of the cliff isnt the place to look at us; come down here and learn of the big and little current, face to face.
 [Learn the details. Also, an invitation to discuss something. Said by Pele to Pāʻoa when he came to seek the lava-encased remains of his friend Lohiʻau.]
  288E hoʻi nā keiki oki uaua o nā pali.Home go the very tough lads of the hills.
 [These lads of the hills were the cowboys of Puʻuwaʻawaʻa and Puʻuanahulu, who were well known for their endurance.]
  696He koaʻe, manu o ka pali kahakō.It is the koaʻe, bird of the sheer cliffs.
 [An expression of admiration for an outstanding person. The koaʻe build their nests on cliffs.]

more pali
717He lālā kamahele no ka lāʻau kū i ka pali.A far-reaching branch of the tree standing on the cliff.
 [A boast of a strong person who, like the tree on the cliff, can withstand gales and pouring rain.]

pali kiʻekiʻe  (1) 470Hanohano nā pali kiʻekiʻe o Wailau.Majestic are the tall cliffs of Wailau.
 [An expression of admiration for a stately and regal person. Refers to Wailau, Molokaʻi.]

pali kū  (1) 1011Hiolo ka pali kū, nahā ka pali paʻa.The standing precipice falls, the solid clff breaks.
 [The resistance is broken down at last.]

pali loa  (1) 438Hāmākua ʻāina pali loa.Hāmākua, land of tall cliffs.
 [Praise of Hāmākua, Hawaiʻi.]

palili  (1) 2107Make nō ke kalo a ola i ka palili.The taro may die but lives on in the young plants that it produces.
 [One lives on in his children.]

Paliloa  (1) 1593Ka ua Paliloa o Waimea.The Tall-cliffs rain of Waimea.
 [The rain of Waimea, Hawaiʻi, that sweeps down the cliffs.]

Paliuli  (2) 471Hanohano Paliuli i ka ua noe.Majestic is Paliuli in the misty rain.
 [An expression of admiration for a person. Paliuli is a mythical place in the mountain region back of the Panaʻewa forest, Hawaiʻi.]
  1491Ka nahele hihipeʻa o Paliuli.The impenetrable forest of Paliuli.
 [Paliuli, in Hilo, was like a mirage — at times seen and at other times unseen.]

palu  (5) 13Ahu ka ʻalaʻala palu.A heap of relish made of octopus liver.
 [Nothing worth troubling about. Octopus liver (ʻalaʻala) was not a choice food. It was mashed and used as bait.]
  882He paluhē wale ka palu.Mashed fish for bait goes to pieces readily.
 [Said of a weakling.]
  900He poʻe ʻuʻu maunu palu ʻalaʻala na kekahi poʻe lawaiʻa.Those who draw out the liver of the octopus, to prepare bait for fishermen.
 [Said of those who do the dirty work by which others reap the benefit.]
  1244ʻIno ka palu ʻaʻohe e mīkokoi ʻia e ka iʻa.When the bait is not good, fish will not gather to eat it.
 [One knows that goodness and graciousness always attract. Palu is bait of dried, mashed octopus liver.]
  1933Kuʻu ʻia ka palu i piʻi ka moano.To let down the mashed fish lure so that the moano fish rises to the surface.
 [To tell tall tales that attract gullible people. Palu (fish lure) here refers to lies. The fish come with the idea of feasting and are caught.]

palu lāʻī  (1) 503Hawaiʻi palu lāʻī.Ti-leaf lickers of Hawaii.
 [This saying originated after Kamehameha conquered the island of Oʻahu. The people of Kailua, Oʻahu, gave a great feast for him, not expecting him to bring such a crowd of people. The first to arrive ate up the meat, so the second group had to be content with licking and nibbling at the bits of meat that adhered to the ti leaves. In derision, the people of Oʻahu called them “ti-leaf lickers.”]

pālua  (2) 162ʻAʻohe kana mai o ka holo o ka lio ia Hanalē; pākahi a ka lio, pālua a ka lio.How Henry made the horses run; one on a horse or two on a horse.
 [How hunger (Henry) made the fingers work in conveying poi to the mouth — with one fmger and with two.]
  2902Waialua, ʻāina kū pālua i ka laʻi.Waialua, land that stands doubly becalmed.
 [Said in admiration for Waialua, O’ahu, where the weather was usually pleasant and the life of the people tranquil.]

paluhē  (1) 882He paluhē wale ka palu.Mashed fish for bait goes to pieces readily.
 [Said of a weakling.]

pāluku  (1) 1058Honuaʻula, e pāluku ʻia ana nā kihi poʻohiwi e nā ʻale o ka Moaʻe.Honuaʻula whose shoulders are pummelled by the Moaʻe wind.
 [A poetical expression for a person being buffeted by the wind. Honuaʻula, Maui, is a windy place.]

palula  (1) 2538ʻŌpū palula.Stomach full of sweet-potato greens.
 [Said of an ignorant person who can only grow sweet potatoes.]

palupalu  (2) 572He heʻe ka iʻa, he iʻa kino palupalu.It is an octopus, a soft-bodied creature.
 [Said of a weakling.]
  883He palupalu nā hewa liʻiliʻi i ka wā kolo, lolelua i ka wā kamaliʻi, loli ʻole i ka wā oʻo, ʻoni paʻa i ka wā ʻelemakule.Small sins are weak in the creeping stage, changeable in childhood, unchanging when an adult, and firmly fixed in age.
 [Bad habits can be changed in the early stages but eventually become firmly implanted.]

Pāmano  (1) 2108Make nō ʻo Pāmano i ka ʻiʻo ponoʻī.It was a near relative who destroyed Pāmano.
 [Troubles often come from one’s nearest relatives. From the legend of Pāmano, a hero who met his death through his uncle, Waipū.]

pana  (1) 1858Kū akula i ka pana a Pikoi-a-ka-ʻalalā, keiki pana ʻiole o ke kula o Keahumoa.Shot by the arrow of Pikoi-[son] of-the-crow, the expert rat-shooter of the plain of Keahumoa.
 [Got his just deserts.]

pana ʻiole  (1) 1858Kū akula i ka pana a Pikoi-a-ka-ʻalalā, keiki pana ʻiole o ke kula o Keahumoa.Shot by the arrow of Pikoi-[son] of-the-crow, the expert rat-shooter of the plain of Keahumoa.
 [Got his just deserts.]

Panaʻewa  (6) 659He kai lū lehua ko Panaʻewa.Panaʻewa shakes down the lehua fringes into the sea.
 [Once, when the forest of Panaʻewa extended to the sea, fringes of lehua blossoms were seen floating about in the water.]
  1570Ka ua kinai lehua o Panaʻewa.The rain that bruises the lehua blossoms of Panaʻewa.
 [Both lehua and rain are commonly found in Panaʻewa.]
  1585Ka ua lū lehua o Panaʻewa.The lehua-shedding rain of Panaʻewa.
 [The heavy rain of the lehua forests of Panaʻewa in Hilo, Hawaiʻi. Famed in chants of old.]
  1725Ke kai kuaʻau lehua o Panaʻewa.The sea where lehua fringes float about in the shallows.
 [Long ago, when lehua trees grew down to the shore at Puna and Hilo, the fringes of the flowers often fell into the sea, reddening the surface.]
  1969Lei Hanakahi i ke ʻala me ke onaona o Panaʻewa.Hanakahi is adorned with the fragrance and perfume of Panaʻewa.
 [The forest of Panaʻewa was famous for its maile vines and hala and lehua blossoms, well liked for making lei, so Hilo (Hanakahi) was said to be wreathed with fragrance.]
  2264Nā manu leo nui o Panaʻewa.Loud-voiced birds of Panaʻewa.
 [Loud talkers. Panaʻewa, Hilo, was famous for its lehua forests that sheltered the honey-sucking birds. Here people went to gather lehua and maile.]

pānaʻi  (1) 177ʻAʻohe lokomaikaʻi i nele i ka pānaʻi.No kind deed has ever lacked its reward.

pānānā  (1) 1125Hū hewa i Kapua ka ʻauwaʻa pānānā ʻole.The fleet of canoes without a compass landed at Kapua by mistake.
 [Said of one who is off his course, mentally or otherwise. A saying from Kohala.]

panau  (2) 867He ʻōpae, he panau.A shrimp that moves with a flip of its tail.
 [Said of one who gads about. He is compared to a shrimp who with one flip of its tail is over here, and with another flip is over there.]
  955He ula no ka naele, panau no ka hiʻu komo i ke ale.That is a lobster of a sea cave, with one flip of the tail he is in the rocky cavern.
 [Said of an independent person who knows how to take care of himself.]

pane  (4) 11A hua a pane; a pane ka waha, he hoʻolono ko neʻi.A word in reply; open the mouth and speak, for a listener is here.
 [A command to speak up and tell what one has come for. Used in hoʻopāpā riddling.]
  884He pane makamaka ʻole.An answer that keeps no friends.
 [A rude retort.]
  2837Ua ola nō i ka pane a ke aloha.There is life in a kindly reply.
 [Though one may have no gift to offer to a friend, a kind word or a friendly greeting is just as important.]

paneʻe  (3) 371E paneʻe ka waʻa ʻoi moe ka ʻale.Set the canoes moving while the billows are at rest.
 [Said by Holowae, a kahuna, to suggest that Kalaniʻōpuʻu retum to Hawaiʻi while there was peace. Later used to stir one to action.]
  589He honu ka ʻāina he mea paneʻe wale.Land is like a turtle: it moves on.
 [Land passes slowly but inexorably from owner to heir.]
  954He ula, ke paneʻe ala ka huelo.It is a lobster, for it flips its tail.
 [Said of a person who is always moving about.]

pani  (2) 124ʻAʻohe ʻai pani ʻia o ka ʻamo.No particular food blocks the anus.
 [All food is good; there is none that hinders evacuation. A rude remark to a very finicky person.]
  1377Ka iʻa pani i ka waha o ke kānaka.The fish that closes the mouth of men.
 [The pearl oyster, which was gathered in silence.]

pani wai  (2) 1314Ka hilu pani wai o Hauʻula.The water-damming hilu fish of Hauula.
 [Refers to Hauʻula, Oʻahu. In ancient days, two brothers came from Kahiki in the form of hilu fish. Near Oʻahu they separated, one going to the east side of the island and the other to the west. The younger brother was caught in a net at Hauʻula and divided among the families of the fishermen. When the older brother arrived he was grieved to find pieces of his brother’s body throughout the village. He went to the upland and dammed the water of the stream with his own body. After a while he rose, and the backed-up water rushed down, sweeping everyone into the sea. The pieces of his brother’s body were joined again into a hilu fish.]
  1781Ke pani wai o ʻĪao.The dam of ʻĪao.
 [In a battle between Kamehameha and Kalanikūpule at ʻĪao, Maui, the latter escaped and fled to Oʻahu. The stream of ʻĪao was dammed by the bodies of the dead. This battle was called Kaʻuwaʻupali (Precipice-clawing) because the defeated warriors clawed the hillside in an attempt to escape.]

pānini  (2) 2415ʻŌkalakala heu pānini, ke piʻi nei koʻu maneʻo.It is unpleasant here with fine cactus spines; I am beginning to itch.
 [A taunt when someone loses his temper.]
  2821Ua loaʻa i ka heu o ka pānini.Caught by the fuzz of the cactus fruit.
 [Has something to be irritated about.]

paniwai  (1) 443Hāmama nā paniwai o Kulanihākoʻi.The lids of Kulanihākoʻi are removed.

pano  (1) 983He weo ke kanaka; He pano ke aliʻi.A commoner is dark; a chief is darker still.
 [A commoner is reddened in the sunlight and is as approachable as day; but a chief surrounded by kapu is as unapproachable as the black of night.]

panoa  (1) 24Aia akula i kula panoa wai ʻole.Gone to the dry, waterless plain.
 [Gone where one may find himself stranded or deserted.]

panopano  (2) 256ʻEā! Ke kau mai nei ke ao panopano i uka. E ua mai ana paha.Say! A black cloud appears in the upland. Perhaps it is going to rain.
 [A favorite joke uttered when a black-skinned person is seen.]
  330ʻEleʻele Hilo, panopano i ka ua.Dark is Hilo, clouded with the rain.
 [Hilo is always rainy.]

pao  (3) 1253I pao i ka huewai nuku pueo a ke kanaka.Pecked at the man’s short-necked gourd bottle.
 [Attempted an affair with another’s wife. This saying comes from the story of the ʻelepaio bird that pecked at a man’s water bottle while he slept.]
  1893Kū ka pao a Keawe.Keawe’s burial place stands.
 [Said of Hale-o-Keawe in Hōnaunau, Kona, Hawaiʻi.]
  2599Pao ka lima, ʻae ka waha.The hand reaches under, the mouth agrees.
 [Said of one who makes promises while accepting bribes.]

paoa  (9) 93ʻAkahi ka hoʻi ka paoa, ke kau nei ka mākole pua heʻo.Here is a sign of ill luck, for the red-eyed bright-hued one rests above.
 [Said when a rainbow appears before the path of one who was on a business journey. Such a rainbow is regarded the same as meeting a red-eyed person — a sign of bad luck. Better to turn about and go home.]
  597He huakaʻi paoa, he pili i ka iwi.An unlucky journey in which the body was wagered.
 [Suffering.]
  727He lawaiʻa paoa.A luckless fisherman.
 [Said of one who is unlucky in fishing or in gaining the attention of a desired member of the opposite sex.]
  1005Hilo, nahele paoa i ke ʻala.Hilo, where the forest is imbued with fragrance.
 [Hilo’s forest is fragrant with hala and lehua blossoms.]
  1108Hoʻopau kaʻā, he lawaiʻa paoa; hoʻānuānu ʻili o ka hele maunu.An unlucky fisherman wastes time in wetting his line; he merely gets his skin cold in seeking bait.
 [Said of an unlucky person who, in spite of every effort, gets nothing.]
  1177I kahi ʻē nō ke kumu mokihana, paoa ʻē nō ʻoneʻi i ke ʻala.Although the mokihana tree is at a distance, its fragrance reaches here.
 [Although a person is far away, the tales of his good deeds come to us.]

more paoa
2403ʻO ka hana ia a ka lawaiʻa iwi paoa, iho nō ka makau, piʻi nō ka iʻa.That is the way of a fisherman with lucky bones — down goes his hook, up comes a fish.
 [Said of a lucky person. It was believed that certain people’s bones brought them luck in fishing. When they died their bones were sought for the making of fishhooks.]

paoʻo  (1) 885He paoʻo ka iʻa ʻaʻohe kāheka lēhei ʻole ʻia.There is no sea pool that a pāoʻo fish does not leap into.
 [An active person is found everywhere]

pāoʻo  (3) 886He pāoʻo lēkei.A leaping pāoʻo fish.
 [Said of one who is never idle.]
  1417Kā! Ke lele mai nei ka pāoʻo.Ha! The pāoʻo fish is leaping about.
 [A remark made about one who snuffles and does not blow his nose. The mucus of a runny nose darts in and out of the nostril like a pāoʻo fish in its sea pool.]
  1653Ka wai hūnā a ka pāoʻo.The hidden water of the pāoʻo fish.
 [A little pool of water on Lehua often mentioned in chants of Niʻihau. It is said to be guarded by a supernatural pāoʻo fish. When this fish rises to the surface, its back resembles the surrounding rocks, which makes the pool difficult to see. When the pāoʻo sinks to the bottom, the water can again be seen. Also, a pool not far from the crater of Kīlauea. The priests of Pele who knew of its location obtained water from it to mix with the ʻawa drinks they offered to her. Like the pool on Lehua, a supernatural pāoʻo fish guarded it. This pool was destroyed during the making of a road.]

paʻōʻō  (1) 157ʻAʻohe kahe o ka hou i ka ʻōʻō kōhi paʻōʻō a kamaliʻi.With the digging implement used by children to dig up leftover potatoes, no perspiration is shed.
 [Said of a task requiring little elfort.]

papa  (9) 390Haʻa hoʻi ka papa; ke kāhuli nei.Unstable is the foundation; it is turning over.
 [Said of an unstable person or situation. First used by Hiʻiaka in a chant while playing kilu at the residence of Peleʻula.]
  403Hāʻawi papa heʻe nalu.A surfboard giving.
 [To give a thing and later ask for its return. A surfboard is usually lent, not given outright.]
  504Hāwāwā ka heʻe nalu haki ka papa.When the surf rider is unskilled, the board is broken.
 [An unskilled worker bungles instead of being a help. There is also a sexual connotation: When the man is unskilled, the woman is dissatisfied.]
  1052Holo iʻa ka papa, kau ʻia e ka manu.When the shoals are full of fish, birds gather over them.
 [Where there is food, people gather.]
  1534Ka papa kāhulihuli o Wailuku.The unstable plank of Wailuku.
 [Said of an unstable person or situation. First uttered by Hiʻiaka when she compared the physical condition of the chief ʻOlepau to the weak plank that spanned Wailuku Stream in Hilo.]
  2157Mimiki ke kai, ahuwale ka papa leho.When the sea draws out in the tidal wave, the rocks where the cowries hide are exposed.
 [Secrets will out on the day of wrath.]

more papa
2306Neʻe papa ka helu a ka lā i Punahoa.The sun continued to scorch at Punahoa.
 [The fight didn’t end quickly.]

pāpā lāʻau  (1) 366E, ʻolohaka! I ke ʻehu nō o ka lāʻau pālau, kulana; hākālia nō a pāpā lāʻau aku o ka make nō ia.Say! The person is hollow. With just the passing breeze of a brandished club, he falls. As soon as a spear touches him, he dies.
 [Said by Pupukea, a chief of Kaʻū, of Makakuikalani, chief of Maui, in an exchange of insults. Later commonly used to refer to weaklings.]

pāpaʻa  (6) 170ʻAʻohe lihi i ka pāpaʻa.Absolutely burned to a crust.
 [Completely destroyed.]
  193ʻAʻohe nānā i ko lalo ʻai i ke pāpaʻa; e nānā i ko luna o ahulu.Never mind if the food underneath burns; see that the food at the top is not half-cooked.
 [Never mind the commoners; pay attention to the chiefs.]
  194ʻAʻohe nao ʻai i ka pāpaʻa.Nothing at all but burnt food to eat.
 [A terrible situation.]
  887He pāpaʻa ke kō, paʻa ke aloha.The pāpaʻa is the sugar cane that holds fast to love.
 [Said of the pāpaa variety of sugar cane, used in hana aloha sorcery.]
  2244Nā kūmau palapaʻa o Naʻalehu, ʻo ia mau nō ka pāpaʻa.The thick-walled calabashes of Naʻalehu are always crusted [with dried poi].
 [A Kaʻū saying — the thick-headed natives of Naʻalehu are strict adherents to principles.]
  2502Olowalu ihu pāpaʻa.Crusty-nosed Olowalu.
 [Disparaging expression for the people of Olowalu, Maui, where the wind is said to blow into the nostrils, drying the mucus into crust.]

Papaʻenaʻena  (1) 2654Pili pono ka lā i Papaʻenaʻena.The sun concentrates its heat at Papaʻenaʻena.
 [Said of the heat of temper. A play on ʻenaena (red-hot).]

papahi  (1) 2600Papahi i ka hae o ka lanakila.Honor the flag of the victor.
 [Said in praise of a victorious person.]

pāpaʻi  (7) 53Aia ka ʻoʻoleʻa o ka pāpaʻi i ka niho.The strength of the crab is in the claw.
 [All noise but no action. Said of one who makes threats but doesn’t carry them out.]
  407Hāhā pōʻele ka pāpaʻi o Kou.The crabs of Kou are groped for in the dark.
 [Applied to one who goes groping in the dark. The chiefs held kōnane and other games at the shore of Kou (now central Honolulu), and people came from everywhere to watch. Very often they remained until it was too dark to see and had to grope for their companions.]
  811He maunu ʻekaʻeka; pāpaʻi ka iʻa e hoʻi ai.With foul bait one can only catch crabs.
 [Poor output makes poor income.]
  840He niho haʻi wale ko ka pāpaʻi.A crab has claws that break off easily.
 [Said of one who offers to fight but backs down when the challenge is accepted.]
  888He pāpaʻi niho mole.A crab minus a claw.
 [Said of a person with a missing tooth.]
  1746Kekē ka niho o ka pāpaʻi.The crab exposes its teeth.
 [Sometimes when a crab sees a person it opens its claws as if to bite and then, at the first opportunity, seeks escape. Said of a threat that is uttered but will never be carried out.]
  2516ʻO Nana ka malama; momona ka pāpaʻi.Nana is the month; the crabs are fat.

Papakōlea  (1) 2800Ua ka ua i Papakōlea, ihea ʻoe?When it rained in Papakōlea, where were you ?
 [The reply of a sweet-potato grower on Papakōlea to one who asks for some of his crop. If one answered that he had been there when the rain fell to soak the earth for planting, and had not planted, then he was lazy and would be given no potatoes.]

Papalaua  (1) 2756Pupuhi kukui o Papalaua, he ʻino.Light the candle of Papalaua, the weather is had.
 [Said of Papalaua, Molokaʻi, where the sun shines for only part of the day. When the weather was bad the valley became dark before the day was gone, and candles had to be lighted. Sometimes said facetiously when a day is gloomy and a light is required to see.]

Papalauahi  (1) 424Hala ka Puʻulena aia i Hilo ua ʻimi akula iā Papalauahi.The Puʻulena breeze is gone to Hilo in search of Papalauahi.
 [Said of one who has gone away or of one who finds himself too late to do anything.]

pāpale  (2) 2601Pāpale ʻai ʻāina, kuʻu aloha.The head-covering over the land, my beloved.
 [Said of Kamehameha by his wife, Kaʻahumanu.]
  2928Wehe pau ka pāpale!Away went the hat!
 [He put on his hat and offhe went.]

pāpālua  (2) 694He kino pāpālua.A dual-formed person.
 [Said of a supernatural being having two or more forms, or of one who is “possessed” by intoxicants.]
  1804Kino pāpālua.Dual bodied.
 [Said of one who had the nature of a god and that of a human being, and who mingled with humans as a human and with gods as a god. Later applied humorously to one who is drunk, meaning that when drunk he is possessed by the “god” of rum but when sober he is an ordinary mortal.]

papani  (1) 2602Papani ka uka o Kapela; puaʻi hānono wai ʻole o Kukaniloko; pakī hunahuna ʻole o Holoholokū; ʻaʻohe mea nāna e ʻaʻe paepae kapu o Līloa.Close the upland of Kapela; no red water gushes from Kukaniloko; not a particle issues from Holoholokū; there is none to step over the sacred platform of Līloa.
 [The old chiefs and their sacredness are gone; the descendants are no longer laid to rest at Ka-pela-kapu-o-Kakaʻe at ʻīao; the descendants no longer point to Kukaniloko on Oʻahu and Holoholokū on Kauaʻi as the sacred birthplaces; there is no one to tread on the sacred places in Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, where Līloa once dwelt.]

papapau  (1) 2603Papapau kākou, he ʻaʻā ko ka hale.We are all destroyed; only lava rocks will be found in the house.
 [Utter destruction, as by a lava flow.]

pāpaʻu  (5) 267E ʻau mālie i ke kai pāpaʻu, o pakī ka wai a pula ka maka.Swim quietly in shallow water lest it splash into the eyes.
 [A cautioning to go carefully where one isn’t sure of conditions.]
  613He iʻa no ka pāpaʻu, he loaʻa wale i ka hopu lima; he iʻa no ka hohonu, noho i kaʻeaʻea.Fish of the shallows are easy to catch with the hands; but fish of the depths keep the fisherman wet with sea sprays.
 [Ordinary folks are easy to find but an outstanding one is not.]
  725He lawaiʻa no ke kai pāpaʻu, he pōkole ke aho; he lawaiʻa no ke kai hohonu he loa ke aho.A fisherman of the shallow sea uses only a short line; a fisherman of the deep sea has a long line.
 [A person whose knowledge is shallow does not have much, but he whose knowledge is great, does.]
  726He lawaiʻa no ke kai pāpaʻu, he poʻopaʻa ka iʻa e loaʻa.A fisherman in the shallow sea can only catch poʻopaʻa.
 [An untrained, unskilled person is limited in what he can do.]
  1048Hōkai ua lawaiʻa o ke kai pāpaʻu, he poʻopaʻa ka iʻa e hoʻi ai.A fisherman who fools around in shallow water takes home poʻopaʻa fsh.
 [The poʻopaʻa (hard-headed) fish is easily caught with hook and line.]

pāpiā  (1) 1926pāpiā Hilo i ka ua.Hilo stands directly in the path of the rain.

Papio  (1) 1896Kū ka uahi o Papio.Up rose the smoke of Papio.
 [Off she went! The Papio was a boat; rising smoke indicated that she was departing.]

Papiohuli  (1) 2358ʻOhai o Papiohuli.The ʻōhai of Papiohuli.
 [At Papiohuli, Mānā, Kauaʻi, grew the ʻōhai trees that bore red or whitish blossoms. These trees grew in profusion in olden days but are now rare. The blossoms made beautiful lei.]

pau  (45) 97A ka lae o Kalaʻau, pau ka pono o Kakina.After Kalaʻau Point is passed, the virtues taught by Thurston end.
 [So sang a girl after leaving Thurston’s missionary school. After sailing past Molokaʻi on her way home to Honolulu, she resolved to forget his teachings and have her fling. Used today to refer to anything that will not work or cannot be used.]
  180ʻAʻohe mālama pau i ka ʻiole.No one who takes care of his possessions has ever found them eaten by rats.
 [When one takes care of his goods he will not suffer losses.]
  186ʻAʻohe mea koe aku iā Makaliʻi; pau nō ka liko me ka lāʻele.Makaliʻi left nothing, taking [everything] from buds to old leaves.
 [Said of one who selfishly takes all, or of a lecherous person who takes those of the opposite sex of all ages. From a legend surrounding a chief, Makaliʻi, who took from his people until they faced starvation.]
  203ʻAʻohe pau ka ʻike i ka hālau hoʻokahi.All knowledge is not taught in the same school.
 [One can learn from many sources.]
  220ʻAʻole, ʻaʻole i pau koʻu loa.No, my height is not reached.
 [A remark made when there is a reference to killing by sorcery. While drowning a victim to be offered as a sacrifice, the kahuna who did the drowning held his victim down as he repeated, “No, my height is not reached,” meaning that the water covers only the victim, who was advised to “Moe mālie i ke kai o ko haku’ (“Lie still in the sea of your lord”), meaning “Don’t struggle because you are bound to die.”]
  244A waho au o ka poe pele, pau kou palena e ka hoa.After I’ve passed the bell buoy, your limit is reached, my dear.
 [A sailor’s saying used in an old hula song. When the ship passes the bell buoy on its way out to sea, the girl on the shore is forgotten.]

more pau
283E hoʻāʻo nō i pau kuhihewa.Try it and rid yourself of illusions.

paʻu  (1) 1259Ipu paʻu lena i ka uahi.Soot containers yellowed by smoke.
 [A term of contempt applied to the kauā of Kaupō, Maui.]

pāʻū  (1) 2604Pāʻū halakā.A skirt that can be instantly removed.
 [Referring to the hand, when it is used as a shield while bathing in the ocean or a stream.]

pau hiʻu  (1) 266E ao o pau poʻo, pau hiʻu ia manō.Be careful lest you go head and tail into the shark.
 [A warning to be on one’s guard. Nanaue, of Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, had two forms — that of a man and that of a shark. As people passed his farm to go to the beach, he would utter this warning. After they had passed, he would run to the river, change into a shark, and swim under the water to the sea where he would catch and eat those he had warned. No one knew that it was Nanaue who was eating the people until someone pulled off the shoulder covering he always wore and discovered a shark’s mouth between his shoulder blades. After he was put to death the people were safe again.]

pau loa  (1) 476Hao kōʻala ka makani lā, pau loa.With one great sweep of wind, all is gone.

pau manō  (1) 2617Pau Pele, pau manō.[May I be] devoured by Pele, [May I be] devoured by a shark.
 [An oath, meaning “If I fail.. ..” It was believed that if such an oath were not kept, the one who uttered it would indeed die by fire or be eaten by a shark.]

pau ʻole  (1) 2615Pau ʻole nō ka ʻumeke i kekahi, pau ʻole nō ka lemu i ka hāleu.When one does not clean the sides of the poi bowl properly he is not likely to wipe his backside clean after excreting.

pau poʻo  (1) 266E ao o pau poʻo, pau hiʻu ia manō.Be careful lest you go head and tail into the shark.
 [A warning to be on one’s guard. Nanaue, of Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, had two forms — that of a man and that of a shark. As people passed his farm to go to the beach, he would utter this warning. After they had passed, he would run to the river, change into a shark, and swim under the water to the sea where he would catch and eat those he had warned. No one knew that it was Nanaue who was eating the people until someone pulled off the shoulder covering he always wore and discovered a shark’s mouth between his shoulder blades. After he was put to death the people were safe again.]

pau pū  (1) 1066Hoʻokahi e pōʻino, pau pū i ka pōʻino.One meets misfortune, all meet misfortune.
 [Said of those who are important to the community — when misfortune befalls one, it is a misfortune for all. The fall of an able war leader is a disaster to his followers just as the fall of a good warrior is a disaster to the leader. Every member of the group is important.]

paua  (1) 250E ʻai ana ʻoe i ka poi paua o Keaiwa.Now you are eating poi made from the paua taro of Keaiwa.
 [A boast from the district of Kaʻū: “Now you are seeing the very best that we have.” Also used to say, “Now you will find out how fine a girl (or boy) can be in making love.” The paua was the best taro in Kaʻū and the only variety that grew on the plains.]

paukū  (1) 1696Ke hiʻi la ʻoe i ka paukū waena, he neo ke poʻo me ka hiʻu.You hold the center piece without its head and tail.
 [You know only the middle part of the genealogy or legend. What about the origin and the latter part?]

Paukū-nui  (1) 51Aia i Pāʻula ka waha o nei kauwā; aia i Alanaio ka waha o nei kauwā; aia i Paukū-nui ka waha o nei kauā.The mouth of this slave is at Pāʻula; the mouth of this slave is at Alanaio; the mouth of this slave is at Paukū-nui.
 [An insulting saying. It began when Keawe, ruler of Hawaiʻi, went on a visit to Kauaʻi and while in a crowd of chiefs silently broke wind. None knew the source, but it was Keawe’s servant who made this insulting remark. Pāʻula (Red Dish) signifies that the rectal opening shows red; Alanaio (Way-of-the-pinworm) also refers to the anus; and Paukū-nui (Large Segments) refers to large stools. Hence, a red, worm-infested anus that produces large stools. It was not until Keawe returned to Hawaiʻi that his servant learned that his own chief had been the culprit. Pāʻula, Paukū-nui, and Alanaio are place names in Hilo.]

Pāʻula  (1) 51Aia i Pāʻula ka waha o nei kauwā; aia i Alanaio ka waha o nei kauwā; aia i Paukū-nui ka waha o nei kauā.The mouth of this slave is at Pāʻula; the mouth of this slave is at Alanaio; the mouth of this slave is at Paukū-nui.
 [An insulting saying. It began when Keawe, ruler of Hawaiʻi, went on a visit to Kauaʻi and while in a crowd of chiefs silently broke wind. None knew the source, but it was Keawe’s servant who made this insulting remark. Pāʻula (Red Dish) signifies that the rectal opening shows red; Alanaio (Way-of-the-pinworm) also refers to the anus; and Paukū-nui (Large Segments) refers to large stools. Hence, a red, worm-infested anus that produces large stools. It was not until Keawe returned to Hawaiʻi that his servant learned that his own chief had been the culprit. Pāʻula, Paukū-nui, and Alanaio are place names in Hilo.]

pāuli  (1) 2612Pāuli hiwa ka lani o Hilo.Black with rain clouds is the sky of Hilo.
 [Sometimes said in humor when a dark-skinned person is seen.]

paumāʻele  (1) 584He hoa manu nēnē, he hoʻi nō a paumāʻele i ka hale.A goose mate returns to pollute the house.
 [Said to a mate whose relative disgraces the family by committing fornication or adultery with another member.]

Paʻūpili  (2) 1594Ka ua Paʻūpili o Lele.The Pili-soaking rain of Lele.
 [The plains of Lahaina, Maui, were covered with pili grass in ancient days. When the rain poured the grass was well soaked.]
  1703Keikei Lahaina i ka ua Paʻūpili.Majestic Lahaina in the Paʻūpili rain.

pāwehe  (1) 2176Moena pāwehe o Niʻihau.Patterned mat of Niʻihau.
 [Poetic expression often used in reference to Niʻihau. Fine makaloa mats of Niʻihau, beautifully patterned, were famed throughout the islands.]

  (1) 1884Kuʻi ʻia e ka ʻĀpaʻapaʻa.Pounded flat by the ʻĀpaʻapaʻa wind.
 [Said of a sudden and terrible disaster, or of one who has taken a beating. The ʻĀpaʻapaʻa is a wind of Kohala.]

peʻa  (2) 1615Kau ka peʻa, holo ka waʻa!Up go the sails; away goes the canoe!
 [Said humorously of one who dresses up and goes out for a gay time.]
  2620Peʻa nā lima i ke kaha o Kaupeʻa.Crossed his hands bchind him on the land of Kaupeʻa.
 [Met with disappointment. To see someone with his hands crossed behind his back [opea kua) was a sign of bad luck.]

peʻa heke  (1) 2681Poho pono nā peʻa heke a kū ana.A well-filled topsail helped him to arrive.
 [Said of a fast traveler.]

peʻa nui  (1) 1467Ka makani kūkulu peʻa nui, he ʻEka.The ʻEka, the wind that sets up the big sails.
 [When the ʻEka wind blew in Kona, Hawaiʻi, the fishermen sailed out to the fishing grounds.]

peʻahi  (1) 1502Ka niu peʻahi kanaka o Kaipalaoa.The man-beckoning coco pa1ms of Kaipalaoa.
 [The swaying palms that once grew at Kaipalaoa, Hilo, seemed to wave an invitation.]

Peʻapeʻa  (2) 2616Pau o Peʻapeʻa i ke ahi.Peʻapeʻa is destroyed by fire.
 [Said of anything that is consumed by fire or is utterly destroyed. Peʻapeʻa was a chief and a relative of Kamehameha. He was killed by the explosion of a keg of gun powder on Kaʻuiki, Maui.]
  2621Peʻapeʻa maka walu.Eight-eyed Peʻapeʻa.
 [Peʻapeʻa was the son of Kamehameha-nui of Maui.]

peʻe  (7) 284E hoʻi e peʻe i ke ōpū weuweu me he moho lā. E ao o haʻi ka pua o ka mauʻu iā ʻoe.Go back and hide among the clumps of grass like the wingless rail. Be careful not to break even a blade of grass.
 [Retum to the country to live a humble life and leave no trace to be noticed and followed. So said the chief Keliʻiwahamana to his daughter when he was dying. Later used as advice to a young person not to be aggressive or show off.]
  889He peʻe makaloa.A hider among makaloa sedge.
 [A stingy person who keeps his eyes downcast while eating lest he see a passerby and be obliged to call him to come and share the meal.]
  1420Kālaʻe peʻe kākonakona.Kālaʻe hides and avoids contacts.
 [Applied to the kauwā in Kālaʻe, Molokaʻi. The chiefs there were proud and arrogant and the kauwā were full of humility and fear for their lives.]
  1595Ka ua peʻe pōhaku o Kaupō.The rain of Kaupō that makes one hide behind a rock.
 [It falls so suddenly that one flees behind rocks for shelter.]
  1596Ka ua peʻe pū hala o Huelo.The rain of Huelo that makes one hide in a hala grove.
  1883Kuʻikuʻi, hana pele; holo i uka, holo i kai, holo i kahi e peʻe ai a nalo.Pound, pound, pulverize; run mountainward, run seaward, run till you find a hiding place and hide.
 [The chant used in hide-and-go-seek. One child gently pounds the back of the “master” and repeats this chant while the other children run and hide.]
  2622Peʻe kua o Kaʻulahaimalama; o Kekūhaupiʻo ka makua; hilinaʻi aʻe i ka pale kai, kālele moku aʻe ma hope.Kaʻulahaimalama is secretive; Kekūhaupiʻo (Stands-leaning) is her father; she leans against the canoe side and rests against the back of the canoe.
 [Said of one who tries to conceal the true offender by pretending to know nothing.]

peʻe poli  (1) 1547Ka pūnua peʻe poli.The fledgling that hides in the bosom.
 [A young sweetheart.]

peʻepeʻe  (2) 2623Peʻepeʻe pū hala.Hiders among the hala trees.
 [An epithet for the kauā of Hāmākualoa, Maui.]
  2917Wai peʻepeʻe palai o Waiakekua.The water of Waiakekua that plays hide-and-seek among the ferns.
 [Waiakekua is in Mānoa.]

pehea  (3) 2046"Mai hea mai ʻoe?" “Mai Kona mai.” “Pehea ka ua o Kona?” “Palahī puaʻa ka ua o Kona.” “A pehea ke aku?” “Hī ka pā, hī ka malau.”“Where are you from?” “From Kona.” “How is the rain of Kona?” “The rain of Kona pours like the watery excreta of a hog.” “How are the aku fish?” “They run loose from the hook and the bait carrier.”
 [Said in fun of one suffering from loose bowels. Once, a chief was out relieving himself when his bowels were very loose. A runner came by the little-traveled path through the underbrush and seeing the chief there extended his greetings. The chief began to ask questions, which the runner answered. When the chief went home he told those of his household of the abundance of rain and the run of fish in Kona. His servant, whose curiosity was roused, asked, “What were you doing at the time?” “I was excreting, and my bowels were loose,” answered the chief. “He wasn’t talking about the rain and fish,” said the servant, “he was talking about you.” The chief was angry when he heard this, but it was too late to do anything about it.]
  2133"Māmaki" aku au, “hamaki” mai ʻoe. Pehea ka like?I say “māmaki” and you say “hamaki.” How are they alike?
 [Once a Hawaiian had some tapa made of māmaki bark which he wished to trade with some white sailors. He did not speak English and they did not speak Hawaiian. He said, “He kapa māmaki kēia.” (“This is kapa made of māmaki.”) Although they did not know exactly what he said, they understood that his goods were for sale. They asked, “How much?” He thought they were asking what kind of tapa he had, so he answered, “Māmaki.” Again the sailors asked, “How much?” which sounded like “hamaki” to the Hawaiian. In exasperation he cried, “I say ʻmāmaki’ and you say ʻhamaki.’How are they alike?” This utterance came to apply to two people who absolutely cannot agree.]

pehi  (3) 1195I ka pono kau i nā waha, mai noho a pehi wale aku.Those who put into the mouth need not throw stones.
 [The mouths that eat the food should never revile the producers.]
  1597Ka ua pehi hala o Hāmākua.The rain of Hāmākua that pelts the pandanus fruit clusters.
 [Refers to Hāmākua, Maui.]
  2880Unu pehi ʻiole.Pebble to pelt rats with.
 [A person of no consequence.]

pehia  (1) 2250Nā lehua o Līhau i pehia e ka noe.The lehua blossoms oj Līhau, weighted by the mist.
 [Līhau, a mountain of Maui, was noted for its beautiful lehua blossoms.]

pehu  (1) 2359ʻO Hāna ia, he ʻāina au pehu.That is Hāna, land where lack was known.

peke  (2) 1517Ka ʻoʻopu peke o Hanakāpīʻai.The short ʻoʻopu of Hanakāpīʻai.
 [The ʻoʻopu at Hanakāpīʻai on Kauaʻi were said to be shorter and plumper than those anywhere else. Mentioned in chants.]
  2529ʻOʻopu peke o Hanakāpīʻai.The stunted ʻoʻopu fish of Hanakāpīʻai.
 [Famed in the legends of Kauaʻi are the ʻoʻopu of Hanakāpīʻai, which are said to be plump and shorter in length than those elsewhere. Sometimes applied humorously to a short, plump person.]

pekepeke  (1) 1952Lauʻī pekepeke.Short-leaved ti plant.
 [An insult applied to the kauā. Like small-leaved ti, they weren’t of much use. Longer leaves were better liked because they were useful as food wrappers.]

pela  (1) 1537Ka pela kapu o Kakaʻe.The sacred flesh of Kakaʻe.
 [The burial place of chiefs in ʻĪao Valley.]

pēlā  (3) 1200ʻIke aku, ʻike mai, kōkua aku kōkua mai; pēlā ihola ka nohona ʻohana.Recognize and he recognized, help and he helped; such is family life.
 [Family life requires an exchange of mutual help and recognition.]
  2441ʻO kau aku, ʻo kā ia lā mai, pēlā ka nohona o ka ʻohana.From you and from him — so lived the family.
 [The farmer gave to the fisherman, the fisherman to the farmer.]
  2624Pēlā iho a hala aʻe ka ua ka mea makaʻu.Wait until the thing that is feared, the rain, has gone its way.
 [Wait until this person whom we are afraid of or do not want with us has gone.]

Pele  (4) 521He akua ʻai ʻopihi ʻo Pele.Pele is a goddess who eats limpets.
 [Pele was said to be fond of swimming and surfing. While doing so she would pause to eat seafood.]
  1883Kuʻikuʻi, hana pele; holo i uka, holo i kai, holo i kahi e peʻe ai a nalo.Pound, pound, pulverize; run mountainward, run seaward, run till you find a hiding place and hide.
 [The chant used in hide-and-go-seek. One child gently pounds the back of the “master” and repeats this chant while the other children run and hide.]
  1950Lauahi Pele i kai o Puna, one ʻā kai o Malama.Pele spreads her fire down in Puna and leaves cinder down in Malama.
 [There are two places in Puna called Malama, one inland and one on the shore where black sand (one ʻā) is found.]
  2617Pau Pele, pau manō.[May I be] devoured by Pele, [May I be] devoured by a shark.
 [An oath, meaning “If I fail.. ..” It was believed that if such an oath were not kept, the one who uttered it would indeed die by fire or be eaten by a shark.]

pelehū  (2) 2684"Pokeokeo, pokeokeo," wahi a ka pelehū.“Gobble, gobble,” says the turkey.
 [Said of one who has received a sizeable sum or is financially secure. A play on pōkeokeo, which refers to the turkeyʻs gobble as well as to a substantial amount of money.]
  2900Wāhine hulu pelehū.Turkey-feathered women.
 [Prostitutes who carry on with sailors in order to obtain finery to adorn themselves.]

Pelekunu  (1) 2344No Pelekunu mai paha?From Pelekunu, perhaps?
 [Said of one who is not clean. A play on pelekunu (musty odor). Refers to Pelekunu, Molokaʻi.]

pēpē  (4) 2626Pēpē i ka ua hoʻopoponi ʻili.Bruised by the rain that bruises the skin.
 [Said of one whose feelings are hurt.]
  2627Pēpē i ka wai o Niuliʻi.Crushed by the water of Niuliʻi.
 [Rendered helpless or made humble and obedient.]
  2628Pēpē ka nahele o Upeloa, nāwali i ka ua kakahiaka.Crushed is the shruhhery of Upeloa, weakened by the morning rain.
 [An expression used in chants. Said of a person who is crushed by humiliation or woe, or of a craven person.]
  2629Pēpē ʻōmaka ʻoe, pā i ka paʻakai, uāniʻi.You are a weak ʻōmaka — when touched with salt you stiffen.
 [The ʻōmaka is a small, soft fish. Said to a weakling who, with outside help, gains a little courage.]

pepeʻe  (1) 2625Pepeʻe a palaholo.A rolled-up frond — paste for tapa cloth.
 [Said of the ʻamaʻu fern, which furnishes sap used in tapa-making. Implies the same thought as the saying, “Great oaks from little acorns grow.”]

pepeiao  (6) 156ʻAʻohe kā he lohe o ko pepeiao huluhulu?Don’t your hairy ears hear?
 [Said in annoyance or disgust for disobedience or heedlessness. The ears are too full of fuzz to let sounds enter.]
  839He Napoʻopoʻo i ʻikea ke poʻo, he Napoʻopoʻo nō i ʻikea ka pepeiao.A [person of] Napoʻopoʻo whose head is seen; a Napoʻopoʻo whose ears are seen.
 [A play on napoʻo (to sink), as the sun sinks in the west. No matter what your claim to rank may be, we can see that your head is low and that your mindfulness of etiquette is equally low.]
  2138Manene ka pepeiao.The ears have an unpleasant sensation.
 [Said when someone uses vulgar and obscene language — the ears are offended.]
  2189Moku ka pepeiao, na ke aliʻi ia puaʻa.When the ear is cut, it is a sign that the pig belongs to the chief.
 [The ears of certain pigs were cut to show that they were the property of the chief.]
  2268Nānā ka maka; hoʻolohe ka pepeiao; paʻa ka waha.Observe with the eyes; listen with the ears; shut the mouth.
 [Thus one learns.]
  2901Waiakea pepeiao pulu ʻaha.Waiakea of the ears that hold coconut-fiber snares.
 [Snares for small fish, shrimp, or crabs were made of a coconut midrib and the fiber from the husk of the nut. When not in use the snare was sometimes placed behind the ear as one does a pencil. This saying is applied to one who will not heed — he uses his ears only to hold his snare.]

peu  (1) 2785Ua hiki ʻole ka ihu o ka puaʻa ke ʻeku a peu.The snout of the hog can no longer root and prod.
 [Said of a man who has lost his sexual potency.]

  (4) 827He momoku .A green fire brand.
 [An unpopular person, who is like green wood that will not burn.]
  2632 ʻia ko wahi pilau iki, ʻaʻole ʻoe i ʻike i ko pilau nui.Refuse to give your little stink a place and youʻll never know when a greater stink will come to you.
 [A curse uttered by a sorcerer to a woman who refuses his advances. In refusing a sexual union with him she may meet a greater “stink”- — death and decomposition.]
  2642 ka ʻamo.The anus breaks wind with small sounds.
 [Said of one who lives the life of a drudge. Such a person is said to be too busy to eat a proper meal and as a result has a gassy stomach.]
  2643 ka ihu, haʻu i ka makani.The nose snorts as he puffs at the wind.
 [He is incoherent with anger.]

pīʻalu  (1) 728Hele a ʻīlio pīʻalu ka uka o Hāmākua i ka lā.Like a wrinkled dog is the upland of Hāmākua in the sunlight.
 [An uncomplimentary remark about an aged, wrinkled person. Line from a chant.]

piapia  (2) 1626Kaululāʻau piapia.Kaululāʻau of the sticky eyes.
 [An expression of derision for one who has the “sand” of sleep in his eyes. Kaululāʻau, son of Kakaʻe of Maui, was banished to Lānaʻi by his father and killed the evil beings that overran the island. The largest group was destroyed very early in the moming. Kaululāʻau applied a gum to their eyes while they slept, thus rendering them blind and helpless.]
  2099Maka piapia.Dirty, sticky eyes.
 [A rude expression applied to one who looks at a thing but doesn’t seem to see it. Also said of the sticky eyes of one who has just gotten up from sleep.]

pīʻena  (1) 1254I pīʻena ka lio i ka pūnuku; e komo kaula waha ʻia ka maikaʻi.The horse shies at the halter; better use the bridle.
 [Advice not to suppress the activities of a wild-behaving person all at once, but to tame him gradually.]

piha  (6) 138ʻAʻohe hale i piha i ka hoihoi; hāʻawi mai a lawe aku nō.No house has a perpetual welcome; it is given and it is taken away.
 [A warning not to wear out one’s welcome.]
  1247I ʻolāʻolā nō ka huewai i ka piha ʻole.The water gourd gurgles when not filled full.
 [A person not very well informed talks more than one who is.]
  2006Lilo i Puna i ke au a ka hewahewa, hoʻi mai ua piha ka hale i ke akua.Gone to Puna on a vagrant current and returning, fnds the house full of imps.
 [From a chant by Hiʻiaka when she faced the lizard god Panaʻewa and his forest full of imps in a battle. It was later used to refer to one who goes on his way and comes home to find things not to his liking.]
  2631Piha ʻōpala ke one o Haʻakua.The sand of Haʻakua is flled with rubbish.
 [Said of one who is untidy, or who talks nonsense. Haʻakua is under the Puʻueo end of the railroad bridge that spans the Wailuku River in Hilo, Hawaiʻi.]
  2847Ua piha a hū ke kīʻaha.The glass was filled to overflowing.
 [One’s wrongdoings exceeded the the limit. Also, one was fed up.]
  2874ʻUmeke piha wai o Mānā.A calabash full of water is Mānā.
 [Refers to Mānā, Kauaʻi, whieh is flooded during the rainy season.]

pihaʻā  (4) 1120Huʻea i kai nā pihaʻā moe wai o uka.Washed down to the sea are the stones and debris of the upland stream beds.
 [Said of a cloudburst that washes the stones from the stream beds, or of a person who, like the torrents, leaves no scandal untold.]
  1299Ka hao a ka wai nui, pihaʻā o kai.When a great flood washes down, the shore is littered with stones and debris from the upland.
 [When one is careless in speech, trouble results.]
  2262Nā mamo pihaʻā i kai o Kaʻaluʻalu.The driftwood descendants at the sea of Kaʻaluʻalu.
 [Said of the innumerable children of large families, who are like the driftwood that litters the beach of Kaʻaluʻalu, Kaʻū.]
  2630Pihaʻā moe wai uka.Stones that lie in the water in the upland.
 [Experts in strenuous sports. They are compared to the stones that not even a freshet can wash down to the lowland.]

pihaʻekelo  (1) 890He pihaʻekelo.Mynah bird.
 [One who chatters all the time.]

pihapiha  (1) 1906Kukū ka pihapiha a piʻi ka lena.The gills stand out and the yellow color arises.
 [Filled with anger.]

pihe  (1) 2500ʻOlo hewa ka pihe.Shouted at the wrong time.
 [Bragged too soon.]

piʻi  (26) 209ʻAʻohe puʻu kiʻekiʻe ke hoʻāʻo ʻia e piʻi.No cliff is so tall that it cannot be scaled.
 [No problem is too great when one tries hard to solve it.]
  282E hiolo ana nā kapu kahiko; e hina ana nā heiau me nā lele; e hui ana nā moku; he iho mai ana ka lani a e piʻi ana ka honua.The ancient kapu will be abolished; the heiau and altars willfall; the islands will be united; the heavens will descend and the earth ascend.
 [A prophecy uttered by Kapihe, a kahuna in Kamehameha’s time. The last part of the saying means that chiefs will come down to humble positions and commoners rise to positions of honor.]
  372E piʻi ana kahi poʻe, e iho ana kahi poʻe.Some folks go up, some go down.
 [While the fingers of some are in the poi bowl, the fingers of others are at the mouth.]
  873He pā ʻai ʻia, ke piʻi ala ke aku.It is a good mother-of-pearl hook, for the aku fish are coming up.
 [Said of an attractive person who has no trouble attracting the opposite sex, or of a lucky person who never fails to get what he wants.]
  1091Hoʻolalau ka helena i Kualoa, piʻi ana i ka pali o Kānehoalani.In wandering about Kualoa, he ascends the cliff of Kānehoalani.
 [He goes off his course and thereby gets nothing. On the cliff of Kānehoalani stands a phallic stone, a symbol of bad luck when seen in a dream.]
  1180I ka holo nō i ke alahao a piʻi i ka lani.While going along the railroad one suddenly goes up to the sky.
 [A drinker soon finds himself “up in the clouds.” An expression used by the sweet-potato beer drinkers of Lahaina, Maui.]

more piʻi
1539Ka piʻi nō ia a kōkī o Wailau.Ascends to the highest point in Wailau.
 [Praise for one who has made a worthy accomplishment. The inhabitants of Wailau, Molokaʻi, a place of tall precipices, were excellent climbers. [cf 2434]]

piʻi aʻe  (2) 619He ikaika nō nā ʻehu kakahiaka no nā ʻōpio, a piʻi aʻe ka lā heha mai a holo.The morning is full of strength for youth, but when the sun is high they become tired and run.
 [Said of the young who do not work as persistently as their parents — they start well but soon quit.]
  2084Mai piʻi aʻe ʻoe i ka lālā kau halalī o ʻike ʻia kou wahi hilahila e ou mau hoa.Do not climb to the topmost branches lest your private parts be seen by your companions.
 [Do not put on an air of superiority lest people remember only your faults.]

piʻi aliʻi  (1) 785He maʻi piʻi aliʻi ke aloha.Love is a disease that does not even spare the chiefs.

Piʻiholo  (2) 623He iki ʻaʻaliʻi kū makani o Piʻiholo.A small, wind-resisting ʻaʻaliʻi bush of Piʻiholo.
 [A small but powerful person.]
  1603Ka ua ʻulalena o Piʻiholo.The reddish-yellow rain of Piʻiholo.

Piʻihonua  (1) 1552Ka ua hehi ʻulu o Piʻihonua.The rain that treads on the breadfruit leaves of Piʻihonua.
 [Refers to Piʻihonua.]

Piʻilani  (2) 417Haki kākala o Piʻilani, ʻike pono ʻo luna iā lalo.Roughness breaks in Piʻilani, those above recognize those below.
 [A storm breaks loose and those above — rain, lightning, thunder, wind — show their effects to the people below.]
  2218Nā hono a Piʻilani.The bays of Piʻilani.
 [The realm of Piʻilani, a powerful ruling chief of Maui, included the islands of Molokaʻi and Lānaʻi, as well as all the bays of Maui whose names begin with hono.]

piʻina  (1) 617He ihona, he piʻina, he kaolo.A going down, a going up, a going on a level road.
 [So it is with life.]

piʻipiʻi  (2) 19Ahulau ka Piʻipiʻi i Kakanilua.A slaughter of the Piʻipiʻi at Kakanilua.
 [In the battle between Kahekili of Maui and Kalaniʻōpuʻu of Hawaiʻi, on the sand dunes of Wailuku, Maui, there was a great slaughter of Hawaiʻi warriors who were called the Piʻipiʻi. Any great slaughter might be compared to the slaughter of the Piʻipiʻi.]
  2641Piʻipiʻi hahai moa.Curly head followed by chickens.
 [Kahahana was a handsome, curly-haired man who was compared to a fine cock who attracts the attention of the hens. Said of any curly-haired man who has a way with women.]

piʻipiʻi kai  (1) 2463ʻO ke kū hoe akamai nō ia, he piʻipiʻi kai ʻole ma ka ʻaoʻao.That is the way of a skilled paddler — the sea does not wash in on the sides.
 [Said of a deft lover.]

pikaʻo  (1) 593He hoʻolua pikaʻo.Food that has to be recooked.
 [Similar to the expression “half-baked.”]

pikapika  (1) 1911Kula unahi pikapika heʻe.Kula people, scalers of the suckers on the tentacles of the octopus.
 [Said in fun of the people of Kula, Maui. A Kula chiefess who lived inland did not know what the suckers on an octopus were and tried to scale them as one scales fish.]

piki  (1) 1928piki mola maoli nō.“Too bit small” indeed.
 [It is such a tiny little bit. Kū piki mola is Hawaiianized from the English.]

piko  (7) 891He piko pau ʻiole.An umbilical cord taken by a rat.
 [A chronic thief. The umhilical cords of infants were taken to special places where the cords of other family members were kept for many generations. If a rat took a cord before it was hidden away safely, the child became a thief.]
  1194I ka piko nō ʻoe lihaliha.Eat of the belly and you will he satiated.
 [The best part of the fish is the belly, especially when it’s fat. There is a play on piko (genitals) whereby this saying acquires sexual import.]
  1756Ke kōpiko i ka piko o Waiʻaleʻale.A kōpiko tree on the summit of Waiʻaleʻale.
 [A boast about an outstanding person.]
  1932Kuʻu ēwe, kuʻu piko, kuʻu iwi, My umbilical cord, my navel, my bones, my blood.
 [Said of a very close relative.]
  2066Mai ka piko o ke poʻo a ka poli o ka wāwae, a laʻa ma nā kihi ʻehā o ke kino.From the crown of the head to the soles of the feet, and the four corners of the body.
 [An expression used in prayers of healing. The four corners are the shoulders and hips; between them are the vital organs of the body.]
  2182Mō ka piko.Cut is the umbilical cord.
 [A friendly relation between closely related persons has been severed. To dream of an injury to one’s piko is an omen of the death of a close relative.]
  2924Wehe ka piko lā, e ka hoahānau.Undone is the navel string, O kinsman.
 [A family relation is severed. Said by Keopuolani to Kekuaokalani when she attempted to quell a rebellion, meaning that the tie of kinship between the two cousins, Liholiho and Kekuaokalani, was being severed by the latter’s refusal to be reconciled.]

pīkoi  (2) 1378Ka iʻa pīkoi kānaka o Kālia; he kānaka ka pīkoi, he kānaka ka pōhaku.The fish caught by the men of Kālia; men are the floaters, men are the sinkers. [Kālia is a fishing net with human floats, human sinkers. (PE)]
 [In ancient days, when a school of mullet appeared at Kālia, Oʻahu, a bag net was set and the men swam out in a row and surrounded the fish. Then the men would slap the water together and kick their feet, driving the frightened fish into the opening of their bag net. Thus the fishermen of Kālia became known as human fishnets.]

Pikoi-a-ka-ʻalalā  (1) 1858Kū akula i ka pana a Pikoi-a-ka-ʻalalā, keiki pana ʻiole o ke kula o Keahumoa.Shot by the arrow of Pikoi-[son] of-the-crow, the expert rat-shooter of the plain of Keahumoa.
 [Got his just deserts.]

pila  (1) 735Hele ʻē ka pila, hele ʻē ka leo.The music is in one pitch and the voice in another.
 [Said of a lack of harmony.]

pīlali  (3) 574He hele pīlali ʻāina maoli nō.A sticky going, as if stuck fast to the land.
 [Said of one who is preoccupied and forgets to go home.]
  711He kumu kukui i heʻe ka pīlali.A kukui tree oozing with gum.
 [A prosperous person.]
  2662Pipili no ka pīlali i ke kumu kukui.The pīlali gum sticks to the kukui tree.
 [Said of one who remains close to a loved one all the time, as a child may cling to the grandparent he loves.]

pilau  (4) 87ʻAi pilau.Eater of filth.
 [Said of one who practiced the sorcery that destroyed others. His god was referred to as akua ʻai pilau (filth-eating god).]
  754Hele nō ka pilau a ke ālia, i kahi nui o ka paʻakai.Decomposition can also he found where there is so much salt that the earth is encrusted.
 [Scandal is found even in the best of families.]
  2632Pī ʻia ko wahi pilau iki, ʻaʻole ʻoe i ʻike i ko pilau nui.Refuse to give your little stink a place and youʻll never know when a greater stink will come to you.
 [A curse uttered by a sorcerer to a woman who refuses his advances. In refusing a sexual union with him she may meet a greater “stink”- — death and decomposition.]

pili  (35) 308Eia ua lani a Hāloa i pili ai ka hanu i ke kapu.Here is a chief descended from Hāloa, whose kapu makes one hold his breath in dread.
 [A compliment to a chief. To be able to trace descent from Hāloa, an ancient chief, was to be of very high rank from remote antiquity.]
  373E pili mai auaneʻi ia pupuka iaʻu!That homeliness will not attach itself to me!
 [Ugliness is not contagious. Said by a good-looking person in answer to, “I wonder why a handsome person like you should have such a homely mate.”]
  487Haʻu ka makani, haʻule ke onaona, pili i ka mauʻu.When the wind puffs, the fragrant blossoms fall upon the grass.
 [When there is an explosion of wrath, people quail before it.]
  559He hāʻawe pili.Carriers of bundles of pili grass.
 [A derogatory saying by the followers of Kamehameha for the people of Kaʻū, who covered the road of Kapaukua with pili grass for their chief Keouakuahuʻula.]
  576Hehi i ka pili.Trample on the relationship.
 [To abolish or disown the relationship.]
  597He huakaʻi paoa, he pili i ka iwi.An unlucky journey in which the body was wagered.
 [Suffering.]

more pili
763He like nō ke koʻele, ʻo ka pili naʻe he like ʻole.The thumping sounds the same, but the fitting of the parts is not.
 [Some do good work, others do not; but the hustle and bustle are the same.]

pili kua  (1) 893He pili kua, he pili alo.Close to the back, close to the front.
 [The husband, standing back of his wife as her protector; the wife, the protected one.]

pili lāʻau  (1) 828He moʻo, he pili pōhaku, he pili lāʻau a he pili lepo.It is a lizard, for it clings to rocks, clings to trees, clings to the earth.
 [Said in derision of one who spies, hiding behind rocks, trees, and so forth. Also said of one who likes climbing over rocks and trees like a lizard.]

pili paʻa  (2) 846He nōpili ka iʻa, pili paʻa ke aloha.The nōpili is the fish; love clings fast.
 [Said of the freshwater goby (ʻoʻopu) of the nōpili variety, known to climb waterfalls by clinging fast to the wet stones. It was used by kāhuna in hana aloha sorcery.]
  2822Ua lohaloha nā hulu ʻekekeu i pili paʻa i ke kēpau.The wing feathers [of the bird] droop, because the bird is caught by [the snarer’s] gum.
 [Said of one who is caught in mischief.]

pili pāpākole  (1) 895He pili pāpākole.A backside relationship.
 [A rude reference to in-laws, used only in anger.]

pili wale  (1) 850He ʻohā pili wale.A young taro that attaches itself to an older corm.
 [Said of a person who attaches himself to another in order to receive care. He is like a young taro that grows beside the parent plant but does not belong to it.]

pilikia  (4) 618He ikaika ke kanaka kaena i ka wā pilikia ʻole, akā he hōhē wale i ka lā o ka pilikia.A braggart is strong when there is no trouble, but flees when there is.
  2332No kahi ka pilikia, pau a pau.When one is in trouble, all [give aid].
  2651Pilikia hoʻi kau a lohe mai.Troubles that [do not] hear.
 [Serious trouble indeed.]

pilina  (2) 2002Like ʻole ka pilina o ka nihoniho.The scallops were not all of the same size.
 [This saying compares people to the scallops on lace. When all are in harmony, they are attractive and interesting. But when they are not, they are like lace with scallops of all sizes and shapes.]
  2308Nele i ka mea poepoe, nele ka pilina mai.Lacking the round object, no one stays around.
 [When one lacks round dollars to spend, companions disappear.]

pilipili  (1) 812He mea ʻai ʻia kahi pilipili maunu kāpae ʻia.The bit of bait set to one side is edible still.
 [A man or woman who has been the mate of another can still be a good mate to have.]

pilipili ʻāina  (2) 204ʻAʻohe pilipili ʻāina wale mai, aia ka iʻa i ke kai.The fish remain at sea and come nowhere near the shore.
 [Said of a person who avoids his friends or relatives.]
  1064Hoʻohū ka ua i ka moana, pilipili ʻāina ʻole mai.The rain driving out to the ocean does not come near the land.
 [Said when a person snubs his old friends.]

Piliwale  (2) 2656Piliwale ka iʻa o Piliwale.The fish of Piliwale press together.
 [Said of one who attaches himself to another. Piliwale was a fishpond at Molokaʻi. When fresh sea water came in at the sluice gate the fish pressed together there. Once, a chief on Kauaʻi fled from the battlefield, followed by his pursuers. He found refuge in Maniniholo cave, but his pursuers discovered his place of concealment and entered. He fled, and, seeing a large rock, pressed himself against it with the hope that he would escape detection. But he was seen and killed. The rock against which he pressed himself was called Piliwale.]

pilo  (3) 17Ahu ke pilo.A heap of stinks.
  205ʻAʻohe pilo uku.No reward is a trife.
 [Even a small gift is appreciated.]
  2871ʻUlu pilo.Stinking breadfruit.
 [A term of contempt for the kauā of Puna, Hawaiʻi, comparing them to rotted breadfruit.]

pinana  (1) 2446ʻO ka ʻulu o lalo he loaʻa i ka pinana, ʻo ka ʻulu o luna loa he loaʻa i ka lou.A breadfruit that is low can he reached by climbing, but a breadfruit high above requires a stick to reach it.
 [A mate of low station is easy to fmd, but one of higher rank is less easily acquired.]

pine  (1) 1400Ka iki ʻulu kēia o Kanekina e kōkē ai nā pine.This is the little bowling ball of Kanekina that knocks down the pins.
 [A boast: This fellow may be small but he is powerful.]

pio  (3) 2606Pau kā ʻoe hana, pio kā ʻoe ahi, pala kā ʻoe ʻāhui.Your work is done, your fire is extinguished, your [banana] bunch has ripened.
 [Said by Kahekili, chief of Maui, after he defeated Peleioholani of Oʻahu. Used with relief and gladness that a person has died. Common in old newspapers.]
  2657Pio ke kukui, pōʻele ka hale.When the light goes out, the house is dark.
 [Said of one whose sight is gone — he dwells in darkness. Also said when life goes and the darkness of death possesses.]
  2850Ua pio ke kukui.The light is extinguished.
 [Said of a person who has fallen asleep and is no longer aware of anything.]

pio ʻole  (1) 1414Ka ipukukui pio ʻole i ke Kauaʻula.The light that will not go out in spite of the blowing of the Kauaʻula wind.
 [Said of the Lahainaluna School, where many leaders of old Hawaiʻi were educated.]

pīʻoeʻoe  (1) 2661Pipili mau ʻia e ka pīʻoeʻoe.Always clung to by barnacles.
 [Said of one who is a constant attraction to the opposite sex.]

pipi  (1) 965He waʻa auaneʻi ka ipu e pau ai nā pipi me nā ʻōpae.A gourd container is not a canoe to take all of the oysters and shrimps.
 [The container is not too large and cannot deplete the supply. A reply to one who views with suspicion another’s food container, or who balks at sharing what he has.]

pipī  (2) 2659Pipī ka wahie, hoʻonui ka pulupulu.If the firewood burns slowly, add more tinder.
 [Keep trying until you succeed.]
  2885ʻUʻuku nō ka ʻuwiki, pipī nō ka ʻā ana.When the wick is small it gives a tiny light.
 [When one does little work, he should expect little gain.]

pīpī  (1) 2658Pīpī holo kaʻao.It is sprinkled, the tale has fled.
 [This is used at the end of a tale to indicate that it is finished.]

pipili  (7) 318E Kaululāʻau, ʻakahi nō pō i pipili ai nā maka.O Kaululāʻau, it is the first night that the eyelids have stuck so.
 [Used in derision of one who doesn’t use his eyes. Kaululāʻau was a Maui chief who, because of his mischief, was banished to the island of Lānaʻi by his father. There he destroyed the evil inhabitants of that island by applying gum to their eyelids after they had fallen asleep.]
  673He kāpili manu no ka uka o ʻŌlaʻa he pipili mamau i ka ua nui.A birdcatching gum of the upland of ʻŌlaʻa that sticks and holds fast in the pouring rain.
 [Said of one who holds the interest and love of a sweetheart at all times.]
  1379Ka iʻa pipili i ka lima.The fish that sticks to the hand.
 [The octopus, whose tentacles have suction cups.]
  2104Make iā Pipili.Killed by Pipili.
 [Killed by Stick-around. So boasted Kamehameha I when he slew Kapakahili, a Maui chief, in the battle of Kawaʻanui. He stuck around and succeeded in eliminating a foe.]
  2660Pipili i ka hana makamaka ʻole, hoʻokahi nō makamaka o ke kaunu a ka manaʻo.Sticks to the work in which friends are ignored; only one friend is considered, the desire of the heart.
 [Said of one who is in love and pays no attention to anyone except the object of his affection.]
  2661Pipili mau ʻia e ka pīʻoeʻoe.Always clung to by barnacles.
 [Said of one who is a constant attraction to the opposite sex.]
  2662Pipili no ka pīlali i ke kumu kukui.The pīlali gum sticks to the kukui tree.
 [Said of one who remains close to a loved one all the time, as a child may cling to the grandparent he loves.]

Pipine  (1) 921He pua na Pipine.A descendant of Pipine.
 [A stingy person. Pipine was a miser of Kaʻū.]

pipipi  (1) 1825Kokolo no o pipipi, o kalamoe me ālealea a ke alo o Kuhaimoana.Pipipi, kalamoe and ālealea crept to the presence of Kuhaimoana.
 [Kuhaimoana is an important shark god, and pipipi, kalamoe and ālealea are shellfish. Said of hangers-on who gather around an important person for favors.]

piwa lenalena  (1) 2015Loaʻa i ka piwa lenalena.He has caught the yellow fever.
 [Said of one who is extremely lazy. A play on lena (lazy).]

  (36) 120Anu hewa i ka , he kuʻuna iʻa ʻole.Feeling the cold air of the night was all in vain; no fish was caught in the net.
 [A wasted effort.]
  137ʻAʻohe hala ʻula i ka .No hala fruit shows its color in the darkness of night.
 [Beauty must be seen to be enjoyed.]
  318E Kaululāʻau, ʻakahi nō i pipili ai nā maka.O Kaululāʻau, it is the first night that the eyelids have stuck so.
 [Used in derision of one who doesn’t use his eyes. Kaululāʻau was a Maui chief who, because of his mischief, was banished to the island of Lānaʻi by his father. There he destroyed the evil inhabitants of that island by applying gum to their eyelids after they had fallen asleep.]
  442Hāmama ka waha he iʻa ʻole.When the mouth yawns, it is a night on which no fish are caught.
 [A sleepy, yawning person isn’t likely to be out catching fish.]
  464Hānau ʻia i ka Lāʻau, lāʻau nā iwi, he koa.Born was he on a Lāʻau night for his bones are hard and he is fearless.
 [Said of a bold, fearless person. Lāʻau nights are a group of nights in the lunar month. The days following each of these nights are believed to be good for planting trees.]
  587He hōʻike na ka .A revelation of the night.
 [A revelation from the gods in dreams, visions, and omens.]

more
819He moa kani ao ia, a kau i ka haka.He is a cock that crows in the daytime, but when night comes he sits on a perch.
 [Said of a person who brags of what he can do, but when difficulties come he is the first to remove himself from the scene.]

poahi  (1) 2315Niniu Molokaʻi, poahi Lānaʻi.Molokaʻi revolves, Lānaʻi sways.
 [A description of the revolving of the hips and the swaying movements in hula.]

pōʻai  (2) 223ʻAʻole e kū ka ikaika i kēia pakela nui; ke pōʻai mai nei ka ʻohu ma uka, ma kai, ma ʻō a ma ʻaneʻi.One cannot show his strength against such odds; the rain clouds are circling from the upland, the lowland, and from all sides.
 [Said by Maheleana, a warrior of Kualiʻi, when he saw his small company surrounded by the enemy.]
  1645Ka wahine pōʻai moku.The woman who made a circuit of the islands.
 [Hiʻiaka, who traveled to all of the islands of the Hawaiian group.]

pōʻai puni  (1) 1599Ka ua pōʻai puni o Kumaka.The rain of Kumaka that completely surrounds.
 [The rain and mists of Kumaka, Kauaʻi, completely screen homes, trees, and so forth from view.]

Pōʻaihale  (1) 1598Ka ua Pōʻaihale o Kahaluʻu.The rain that moves around the homes of Kahaluu.
 [Refers to Kahaluʻu of windward Oʻahu.]

pōʻala  (1) 757Hele pōʻala i ke anu o Waimea.Going in a circle in the cold of Waimea.
 [Said of a person who goes in circles and gets nowhere. Waimea, Hawaiʻi, is a cold place and when foggy, it is easy for one unfamiliar with the place to lose his way.]

poʻalo  (1) 1677Ke aliʻi nāna e kālua i ke poʻo i ka imu a poʻalo aʻe i nā maka.The chief who can roast the head in the imu and scoop out the eyes.
 [Said of a chief who had the power and authority to have the head of one who offended him cut off and roasted in an imu, or to order his eyes dug out. The heads were roasted and then discarded, a warning to lesser chiefs and commoners to respect their superiors.]

pōʻalo  (1) 2663Pōʻalo maka.To gouge out the eyes.
 [Said of an ungrateful person who repays kindness with unkindness, especially by stealing a mate.]

pōʻalo maka  (1) 2214Nā hana pōʻalo maka.Eye-scooping deeds.
 [Acts of treachery toward those who have shown kindness.]

poʻe  (21) 372E piʻi ana kahi poʻe, e iho ana kahi poʻe.Some folks go up, some go down.
 [While the fingers of some are in the poi bowl, the fingers of others are at the mouth.]
  797He mamo paha na ka poʻe o Kahuwā he maʻa i ka hoe ma ke kūnihi.Perhaps they are descendants of the people of Kahuwā who were in the habit of paddling with the edge of the paddle blade.
 [They are stupid people who never do things right.]
  897He poʻe hoʻopiha waʻa.Canoe fillers.
 [A derogatory remark pertaining to useless people who do nothing to help, like riders in a canoe who wield no paddle, no fishnet, and no pole.]
  898He poʻe kao ʻāhiu o ka wao nahele.Wild goats of the wilderness.
 [A wild, unruly people.]
  899He poʻe koa hoe.Canoe-paddling warriors.
 [A disparaging remark about warriors who are not good fighters.]
  900He poʻe ʻuʻu maunu palu ʻalaʻala na kekahi poʻe lawaiʻa.Those who draw out the liver of the octopus, to prepare bait for fishermen.
 [Said of those who do the dirty work by which others reap the benefit.]

more poʻe
1074Hoʻokahi no hulu like o ia poʻe.Those people are all of the same feather.

poe pele  (1) 244A waho au o ka poe pele, pau kou palena e ka hoa.After I’ve passed the bell buoy, your limit is reached, my dear.
 [A sailor’s saying used in an old hula song. When the ship passes the bell buoy on its way out to sea, the girl on the shore is forgotten.]

pōʻele  (4) 407Hāhā pōʻele ka pāpaʻi o Kou.The crabs of Kou are groped for in the dark.
 [Applied to one who goes groping in the dark. The chiefs held kōnane and other games at the shore of Kou (now central Honolulu), and people came from everywhere to watch. Very often they remained until it was too dark to see and had to grope for their companions.]
  2527ʻO ʻOlepau ka mahina; ʻo palaweka ka mahina; ʻo hina wale ka mahina; ʻo hāhā pōʻele ka mahina.ʻOlepau is the moon phase; hazy is the light of the moon; quickly goes the light of the moon; one gropes in the dark.
 [Said of one who is vague or hazy in explaining his thoughts, or of one whose knowledge is vague.]
  2657Pio ke kukui, pōʻele ka hale.When the light goes out, the house is dark.
 [Said of one whose sight is gone — he dwells in darkness. Also said when life goes and the darkness of death possesses.]
  2665Pōʻele ka ʻāina o Puna.The land of Puna is blackened [by lava flows].

poʻeleʻele  (1) 2851Ua poʻeleʻele, e nalowale ai ka ʻili o kānaka.[It is] so dark that the skin of people vanishes.

pōʻeleʻele  (2) 108ʻAlamihi kakani pōʻeleʻele.Black crab that makes a noise in the dark.
 [An expression of annoyance toward one who disturbs the night with noise.]
  1432Kalaoaʻai pōʻeleʻele.Kalaoa eats in the dark.
 [The people of Kalaoa in east Hilo were noted for their lack of hospitality. To avoid having to ask visitors or passers-by to partake of food with them, they ate in the dark where they could not be seen.]

Pōʻeleʻi  (1) 2371ʻO Hinaiaʻeleʻele ke kāne, ʻo Pōʻeleʻi ka wahine, hānau ke keiki, he keiki ʻakena a haʻanui.Hinaiaʻeleʻele is the husband, Pōʻeleʻi (Supreme-dark-one) the wife; a child born to them is a boaster and an exaggerator.
 [Said of a child born in the month of Hinaiaʻeleʻele.]

poepoe  (2) 1347Ka iʻa kaʻa poepoe o Kalapana, ʻīnaʻi ʻuala o Kaimū.The round, rolling fish of Kalapana, to be eaten with the sweet potato of Kaimū.
 [The kukui nut, cooked and eaten as a relish. This is from a hoʻopāpā riddling chant in the story of Kaipalaoa, a boy of Puna, Hawaiʻi, who went to Kauaʻi to riddle with the experts there and won.]
  2308Nele i ka mea poepoe, nele ka pilina mai.Lacking the round object, no one stays around.
 [When one lacks round dollars to spend, companions disappear.]

pohā  (8) 10A hīkapalalē, hinolue o walawala ki pohā!This is what the Hawaiians thought the first white men to visit the islands said.
 [It is untranslatable gibberish repeated with laughter when one is told something utterly incomprehensible.]
  32Aia a pohā ka leo o ka ʻaʻo, kāpule ke momona o ka ʻuwaʻu i ka puapua.When the ʻaʻo birds’ voices are distinctly heard, the ʻuwaʻu birds are fat even to the very tails.
 [The ʻao bird was not heard during the nesting season. When the fledglings emerged and their cries were heard, the season had come when young ʻuwaʻu were best for eating, and the people went to snare them.]
  1008Hinuhinu ka ihu, pohā ka ʻauwae.When the nose shines, the chin gets a blow.
 [Said of a drunken person who gets into a fight.]
  2390ʻO ʻIkuwā i pohā kōʻeleʻele, ʻikuwā ke kai, ʻikuwā ka hekili, ʻikuwā ka manu.ʻIkuwā is the month when the dark storms arise, the sea roars, the thunder roars, the birds make a din.
  2669Pohā i ke alo o Kaʻuiki.A loud, explosive sound before the presence of Kaʻuiki.
 [Said of the drawing up of an aku fish from the water to the chest of the fisherman.]
  2670Pohā ka ʻauwae i ka ʻala.A hard rock smacked the chin.
 [He got what was coming.]

more pohā
2671Pohā ka lae o ke kolohe.Slapped was the brow of the mischief maker.
 [The rascal got his just deserts.]

pōhae  (1) 723He lau maiʻa pala ka wahine, hou aku nō ʻoe, pōhae.A woman is like a yellowed banana leaf that tears when one pokes at it.
 [A woman does not have the strength of a man.]

pōhai  (2) 2667Pōhai ka manu ma luna, he iʻa ko lalo.When the birds circle above, there are fish below.
 [Strong words are a sign of wrath. Fishermen at sea watch where the noio birds gather, for that is a sign that the aku fish are near.]
  2668Pōhai ka neki lewa i ka makani.Surrounded by the reeds that sway in the breeze.
 [Said of one handsome and graceful of movement.]

pōhaku  (19) 164ʻAʻohe kio pōhaku nalo i ke alo pali.On the slope of a cliff, not one jutting rock is hidden from sight.
 [All is distinctly seen or known; there isn’t any use in being secretive or finding a place to hide.]
  828He moʻo, he pili pōhaku, he pili lāʻau a he pili lepo.It is a lizard, for it clings to rocks, clings to trees, clings to the earth.
 [Said in derision of one who spies, hiding behind rocks, trees, and so forth. Also said of one who likes climbing over rocks and trees like a lizard.]
  902He pōhaku ʻolokaʻa pali o Kaholokuaiwa.A stone that rolls down the precipice of Kaholokuaiwa.
 [Said when there is much ado and little accomplished.]
  1276Kaʻa ka pōhaku.The stones roll.
 [Thunder.]
  1341Ka iʻa huli wale i ka pōhaku.The fish that turns over the stones.
 [The wī, a shellfish found in mountain streams. They can be discovered only by turning over the stones to which they cling.]
  1354Ka iʻa kīnohinohi pōhaku.The fish that adorn the rocks.
 [The periwinkles and nerites that cling to the rocks in shallow water.]

more pōhaku
1378Ka iʻa pīkoi kānaka o Kālia; he kānaka ka pīkoi, he kānaka ka pōhaku.The fish caught by the men of Kālia; men are the floaters, men are the sinkers. [Kālia is a fishing net with human floats, human sinkers. (PE)]
 [In ancient days, when a school of mullet appeared at Kālia, Oʻahu, a bag net was set and the men swam out in a row and surrounded the fish. Then the men would slap the water together and kick their feet, driving the frightened fish into the opening of their bag net. Thus the fishermen of Kālia became known as human fishnets.]

pōhaku ʻalā  (1) 624He iki hala au no Keaʻau, ʻaʻohe pōhaku ʻalā e nahā ai.I am a small hala fruit of Keaʻau, but there is no rock hard enough to smash me.
 [The boast of a Puna man — I am small, perhaps, but mighty.]

pōhaku hānau  (1) 674He kapu nā pōhaku hānau aliʻi.A [sign of[ kapu are the stones at the birth of a chief.
 [The peal of thunder heralds the birth of a high chief. Thunder (pōhaku) was likened to the sound of stones rolling.]

pōhaku hekau  (1) 901He pōhaku hekau waʻa.The stone anchor of a canoe.
 [An indolent person.]

pōhaku kihi  (1) 1540Ka pōhaku kihi paʻa.The solid cornerstone.
 [A reliable, dependable person.]

Pōhakupili  (1) 2676Pōhakupili wanawana.Thorny Pōhakupili.
 [An epithet for the kauā of Pōhakupili, Molokaʻi.]

pohāpohā  (2) 2677Pohāpohā i ke keiki o Kaʻakēkē.Smacked by the lad of Kaʻakēkē.
 [Kaʻakēkē was a maika-rolling field at Ualapuʻe, Molokaʻi, where champions often met in ancient days. Said in admiration of any Molokaʻi lad outstanding in sports.]
  2678Pohāpohā ka ihu o ka waʻa i ka ʻale o ka Mumuku.The prow of the canoe is slapped by the billows in the Mumuku gale.
 [Said of a person buffeted by circumstances or of one who has received many blows by the fist.]

Pōhina  (1) 2329Noho pū i ka uahi pōhina.Sat together in the gray smoke.
 [Said of a teacher and pupils who sat about a smoky fire at night.]

pōhina  (1) 1619Kaulana ka pali o Pōhina.Famous is the pali of Pohina.
 [From a chant for the chiefess Maukaʻa of Kaʻū.]

poho  (3) 1372Ka iʻa mili i ka poho o ka lima.The fish fondled by the palm of the hand.
 [When it was the season for the hinana (ʻoʻopu spawn), they were so numerous that they could be scooped up in the palm of the hand.]
  2640Piʻi nō ka poho, kani kohā!Up comes the palm — and bang!
 [A good smack. The pounder is moistened by a dampened hand before it is brought down on a mass of hard poi.]
  2681Poho pono nā peʻa heke a kū ana.A well-filled topsail helped him to arrive.
 [Said of a fast traveler.]

pohō  (4) 904He pohō na ka pohō, ʻo ke akamai no ke hana a nui.Sinking is to be expected where it is naturally found, but one should use as much skill as possible [to avoid it].
 [Losses come easily; it requires skill and wisdom to avoid them.]
  1837Komo pohō i ka naele o Alakaʻi.Sunk in the bog of Alakaʻi.
 [Said of one who is overwhelmed with trouble.]
  2680Pohō i ka mālama i ko haʻi keakea!A waste of effort to take care of someone elseʻs semen!
 [Usually said in anger by one who cares for the children of another. Also expressed Pohō i ka mālama i ko haʻi kūkae!]

poholima  (1) 1878Kū i ka poholima ua mea he wahine maikaʻi.A beautiful woman stands on the palm of the hand.
 [A beautiful woman makes one desire to caress and serve her.]

pohu  (2) 1967Leʻaleʻa ka ʻōlelo i ka pohu aku o loko.Conversation is pleasant when the inside is calm.
 [Talk is pleasant when hunger is satisfied.]
  2682Pohu ka nohona, ua lulu kohekohe.All is calm, even the kohekohe grass is not moved by a breeze.

pōhue  (1) 2691Poʻohū ka lae kahi i ka pōhue.When the forehead lumps, rub it with a gourd.
 [Find the remedy for the problem.]

pōhuehue  (2) 313E kā i ka pōhuehue.Smite with the pōhuehue.
 [Do harm to another in order to destroy him.]
  1342Ka ʻia i ka pōhuehue.Smitten with the pōhuehue.
 [Said of a victim of sorcery. One who bore ill against another would smite the sea with a pōhuehue vine while the intended victim was at sea. It was believed that with the proper incantations this would cause the surf to rise. The sea would become rough and dangerous and the intended victim would be killed.]

poi  (2) 250E ʻai ana ʻoe i ka poi paua o Keaiwa.Now you are eating poi made from the paua taro of Keaiwa.
 [A boast from the district of Kaʻū: “Now you are seeing the very best that we have.” Also used to say, “Now you will find out how fine a girl (or boy) can be in making love.” The paua was the best taro in Kaʻū and the only variety that grew on the plains.]
  1541Ka poi ʻuoʻuo o kāohi puʻu.The tenacious poi that presses down in the throat.
 [A humorous reference to poi.]

poʻi  (5) 448Hana Hilo i ka poʻi a ka ua.Hilo works on the lid of the rain.
 [Refers to the constant showers typical of Hilo district on Hawaiʻi. This is the first line of a chant.]
  641He ʻio poʻi moa.Chicken-catching hawk.
 [Said of a clever thief or of one who steals the sweetheart of another.]
  854He ʻohu poʻi wale iho nō.Only a covering of mist.
 [Said of a person who is a mere figurehead in a high position and has no authority to act. Like the mist, he merely nestles on the peak.]
  905He poʻi na kai uli, kai koʻo, ʻaʻohe hina pūkoʻa.Though the sea he deep and rough, the coral rock remains standing.
 [Said of one who remains calm in the face of difficulty.]
  906He poʻi ʻumeke o Keawe.A calabash lid is Keawe.
 [Said by Kekuʻiapoiwa Liliha, mother of Keopuolani, to mean that the island of Hawaiʻi had no chief of pure blood; at some point the blood of commoners had come in.]

poina  (1) 740He lei poina ʻole ke keiki.A lei never forgotten is the beloved child.

poʻina  (1) 1263I Waialua ka poʻina a ke kai, ʻo ka leo ka ʻEwa e hoʻolono nei.The dashing of the waves is at Waialua but the sound is being heard at ʻEwa.
 [Sounds of fighting in one locality are quickly heard in another.]

pōʻino  (3) 1066Hoʻokahi e pōʻino, pau pū i ka pōʻino.One meets misfortune, all meet misfortune.
 [Said of those who are important to the community — when misfortune befalls one, it is a misfortune for all. The fall of an able war leader is a disaster to his followers just as the fall of a good warrior is a disaster to the leader. Every member of the group is important.]
  2683Pōʻino nā lāʻau aʻa liʻiliʻi i ka ulu pū me ka puakala aʻa loloa.Plants with fine roots are harmed when left to grow with the rough, long-rooted thorny ones.
 [Weak-willed persons are often overcome and influenced by the wicked.]

Poka ʻailana  (1) 2846Ua pau koʻu lihi hoihoi i ka nani o Poka ʻAilana.I havent the slightest interest in the beauty of Ford Island.
 [Said when one has lost interest. This is a line from a chant.]

Pōkāʻī  (1) 1476Ka malu niu o Pōkāʻī.The coco-palm shade of Pōkaī.
 [Refers to Waiʻanae, on Oʻahu. At Pōkāʻī was the largest and best-known coconut grove on Oʻahu, famed in chants and songs.]

pokeokeo  (2) 2684"Pokeokeo, pokeokeo," wahi a ka pelehū.“Gobble, gobble,” says the turkey.
 [Said of one who has received a sizeable sum or is financially secure. A play on pōkeokeo, which refers to the turkeyʻs gobble as well as to a substantial amount of money.]

pōkiʻi  (6) 909He pōkiʻi no Makoa.Makoa’s younger brother.
 [Said in admiration of a speedy athlete. Makoa was a speedy runner in Kamehameha’s day whose swiftness gained him fame.]
  1237I mua e nā pōkiʻi a inu i ka wai ʻawaʻawa.Forward, my younger hrothers, until you drink the bitter water [of battle].
 [Uttered by Kamehameha as he rallied his forces in the battle of ʻĪao Valley.]
  1250I paʻa i ka hānau mua, ʻaʻole e puka nā pōkiʻi.Had the mother died in bearing the oldest, all the others would not have been born.
 [Said in reminding brothers and sisters to respect the hiapo (eldest).]
  2265Nāna i waele mua i ke ala, ma hope aku mākou, nā pōkiʻi.He [or she] first cleared the path and then we younger ones followed.
 [Said with affection and respect for the oldest sibling (hiapo).]
  2461ʻO ke keiki he loaʻa i ka moe, ʻo ka pōkiʻi ʻaʻole.One can produce a child by sleeping with a mate, but he cannot produce a younger brother or sister.
 [Great affection between brothers and sisters, and especially for younger siblings, was not rare in olden days. This saying is a reminder to treat younger ones with love and respect.]
  2685Pōkiʻi ka ua, ua i ka lehua.The rain, like a younger brother, remains with the lehua.
 [Said of the rain that clings to the forest where ʻōhiʻa trees grow.]

poko  (1) 1704Keiki haehae poko o Naʻalehu.The lad of Naʻalehu who tears into bits.
 [Said in admiration of a strong warrior of Naʻalehu who fearlessly attacks his foes. Later said of a Naʻalehu-born person who shows no fear in any situation.]

pōkole  (3) 213ʻAʻohe ʻulu e loaʻa i ka pōkole o ka lou.No breadfruit can be reached when the picking stick is too short.
 [There is no success without preparation.]
  725He lawaiʻa no ke kai pāpaʻu, he pōkole ke aho; he lawaiʻa no ke kai hohonu he loa ke aho.A fisherman of the shallow sea uses only a short line; a fisherman of the deep sea has a long line.
 [A person whose knowledge is shallow does not have much, but he whose knowledge is great, does.]
  2686Pōkole ka naʻau.The intestine is short.
 [Said of a short-tempered person.]

pola  (2) 1226I lele no ka lupe i ke pola.It is the tail that makes the kite fly.
 [It is the number of followers that raises the prestige of the chief.]
  1497Kani ka pola o ka malo.The flap of the loincloth makes a snapping sound.
 [The boast of an athlete so swift in movement that the flap of his loincloth snaps.]

poli  (7) 450Hānai ʻia i ka poli o ka lima.Fed in the palm of the hand.
 [Said of a child reared with constant attention.]
  629He ʻīlio welu moe poli.A well-fed dog that sleeps in the bosom.
 [Said of a well-fed pet dog or of a person who is able to work but is too pampered to want to.]
  1269Ka ʻai hūnā i ka poli.The food hidden in the bosom.
 [Breast milk.]
  1542Ka poli lauaʻe o Makana.Makana, whose bosom is adorned with lauaʻe ferns.
 [Famed in songs and chants are the fragrant lauaʻe fems of Makana, Kauaʻi.]
  2035Maʻemaʻe i ke kai ka pua o ka hala, ua māewa wale i ka poli o Kahiwa.Cleaned by the sea are the blossoms of the hala whose leaves sway at the bosom of Kahiwa.
 [These two lines from a chant of praise for a chief are used as an expression of admiration.]
  2066Mai ka piko o ke poʻo a ka poli o ka wāwae, a laʻa ma nā kihi ʻehā o ke kino.From the crown of the head to the soles of the feet, and the four corners of the body.
 [An expression used in prayers of healing. The four corners are the shoulders and hips; between them are the vital organs of the body.]
  2115Makua keiki i ka poli.The child in the heart has grown up to be a man.
 [Said of one who loved as a child and finds his love reawakened in manhood. First uttered by Lohiʻau, whose love reawakened upon meeting his old sweetheart, Peleʻula.]

Poliʻahu  (1) 2687Poliʻahu, ka wahine kapa hau anu o Mauna Kea.Poliʻahu, the woman who wears the snow mantle of Mauna Kea.
 [Poliʻahu is the goddess of snows; her home is on Mauna Kea.]

Polihale  (1) 2568Pahapaha lei o Polihale.The pahapaha lei of Polihale.
 [At Polihale, Kauaʻi, grew pahapaha (sea lettuce). Visitors gathered and wore this pahapaha in lei because its green color could be revived by immersion in sea water after it had partially dried. Although pahapaha is common everywhere, only that which grows at Polihale revives once it is dry. It is famed in songs and chants of Kauaʻi.]

polihua   see     [note]

Polihua   see     [note]

polohuku  (1) 1608Kau i Kāpua ka poʻe polohuku ʻole.Those without resources will land at Kāpua.
 [Without resources one gets nowhere.]

pololei  (3) 268E! E pololei ana ke kua o mea.Say! The back [of a hunchhacked person] will surely he straightened.
 [Said to one who is always correcting others, as if to say, “Why correct my mistakes? Let’s see if you can straighten a crooked back!”]
  2081Mai ʻōlelo i ke kuapuʻu e kū pololei, o hina auaneʻi.Dont tell the hunchback to stand up straight lest he fall down.
 [Don’t go around correcting others.]
  2688Pololei a ka waha o ke ʻahi.Straight to the mouth of the ʻahi fish.
 [Directly to the point. Used in a fishermanʻs prayers to the gods to take the hook and bait directly to the mouth of the fish.]

pōloli  (2) 428Hala nō ia lā o ka pōloli.A hungry day passes.
 [An expression of thankfulness that there was food for another day.]
  910He pōloli kali ko kahi o nā aliʻi.At the place of a chief one must wait for hunger to be appeased.
 [One must abide by the will and favor of the chief. No one is independent in his presence.]

pōmaikaʻi  (1) 281E hinu auaneʻi nā nuku, he pōmaikaʻi ko laila.Where the mouths are shiny [with fat food], prosperity is there.
 [The prosperous have the richest food to eat.]

pōnaʻanaʻa  (1) 741Hele ke poʻo a pōnaʻanaʻa.The head moves in a confused manner.
 [In a state of having so much to do one doesn’t know where to start.]

Pōnahe  (1) 1737Ke kamalei a Kuluipō, ka hiʻialo a Pōnahe.Beloved child of Kuluipō, one embraced in the arms of Pōnahe.
 [A benighted person. A play on pō (darkness).]

pōnalo  (1) 2376ʻO huaʻole ka lā, ʻo nakaka ka lā, ʻo ʻōmilu ka lā, ʻo pōnalo ka lā.Fruitless is the day, cracked is the day, puny is the day, blighted is the day.
 [Said of a day that brings no luck to the worker.]

poniponi  (1) 1112Hopo ana i ka wai poniponi o Waipuhi.Fearful of the dark water of Waipuhi.
 [Said of one who is fearful of getting into trouble.]

pono  (19) 71Aia nō ka pono — o ka hoʻohuli i ka lima i lalo, ʻaʻole o ka hoʻohuli i luna.That is what it should be — to turn the hands palms down, not palms up.
 [No one can work with the palms of his hands turned up. When a person is always busy, he is said to keep his palms down.]
  97A ka lae o Kalaʻau, pau ka pono o Kakina.After Kalaʻau Point is passed, the virtues taught by Thurston end.
 [So sang a girl after leaving Thurston’s missionary school. After sailing past Molokaʻi on her way home to Honolulu, she resolved to forget his teachings and have her fling. Used today to refer to anything that will not work or cannot be used.]
  325E kuhikuhi pono i nā au iki a me nā au nui o ka ʻike.Instruct well in the little and the large currents of knowledge.
 [In teaching, do it well; the small details are as important as the large ones.]
  355E naʻi wale nō ʻoukou i koʻu pono, ʻaʻole e pau.You can seek out all the benefits I have produced and find them without number.
 [Said by Kamehameha I when he was dying.]
  384E waikahi ka pono i mānalo.It is well to be united in thought that all may have peace.
  553He aupuni palapala koʻu; ʻo ke kanaka pono ʻo ia koʻu kanaka.Mine is the kingdom of education; the righteous man is my man.
 [Uttered by Kamehameha III.]

more pono
620He ʻike ʻana ia i ka pono.It is a recognizing of the right thing.
 [One has seen the right thing to do and has done it.]

pono ke  (1) 2437ʻO ka pono ke hana ʻia a iho mai nā lani.Continue to do good until the heavens come down to you.
 [Blessings come to those who persist in doing good.]

ponoʻī  (1) 321E kipi ana lākou nei. ʻAʻole naʻe ʻo lākou ponoʻī akā ʻo kā lākou mau keiki me nā moʻopuna. ʻO ke aliʻi e ola ana i ia wā e kū ʻōlohelohe ana ia, a ʻo ke aupuni e kūkulu ʻia aku ana, ʻo ia ke aupuni paʻa o Hawaiʻi nei.These people [the missionaries] are going to rebel; not they themselves, but their children and grandchildren. The ruler at that time will be stripped of power, and the government established then will be the permanent government of Hawaiʻi.
 [Prophesied by David Malo.]

poʻo  (21) 33Aia a wela ke poʻo o ke keiki i ka lā.When the head of the child is warmed by the sun.
 [When he is old enough to toddle or creep by himself into the sunlight.]
  140ʻAʻohe hana a Kauhikoa, ua kau ke poʻo i ka uluna.Kauhikoa has nothing more to do but rest his head on the pillow.
 [Everything is done and one can take his ease. Kauhikoa, a native of Kohala, was a clever person who could quickly accomplish what others would take months to do.]
  190ʻAʻohe mea nāna e paʻi i ke poʻo.No one to slap his head.
 [He has no equal in his accomplishments.]
  741Hele ke poʻo a pōnaʻanaʻa.The head moves in a confused manner.
 [In a state of having so much to do one doesn’t know where to start.]
  839He Napoʻopoʻo i ʻikea ke poʻo, he Napoʻopoʻo nō i ʻikea ka pepeiao.A [person of] Napoʻopoʻo whose head is seen; a Napoʻopoʻo whose ears are seen.
 [A play on napoʻo (to sink), as the sun sinks in the west. No matter what your claim to rank may be, we can see that your head is low and that your mindfulness of etiquette is equally low.]
  913He poʻo hūnā i ka lewa.A head hidden in the sky.
 [Said of a god, who is invisible. Also expressed He poʻo hūnā i ke aoūli.]

more poʻo
914He poʻo ulu ko nā mea kanu.Plants have heads that grow again.
 [An assurance that if you break off the top of a plant, it will put forth a new one.]

poʻo hakahaka  (1) 2145Maui poʻo hakahaka.Maui the empty headed.
 [The people of Maui were said to lack intelligence. This saying originally referred to the empty skulls of defeated Maui warriors.]

poʻo maunu  (1) 2490ʻOla nō ka lawaiʻa i kahi poʻo maunu.A fisherman can subsist on his left-over bait.
 [Bait made from octopus heart was carefully prepared and kept in a clean container. When a fisherman had no luck in fishing, the bait was eaten with poi.]

poʻo nui  (1) 1600Ka ua poʻo nui o ke kuahiwi.The big-headed rain of the mountain.
 [The ʻAwa rain, which falls in fine, icy cold drops that make one’s head appear white.]

poʻohiwi  (1) 2813Ua lawa pono nā poʻohiwi.The shoulders are well supplied.
 [Said of a strong person who can do any kind of hard work.]

poʻohū  (2) 2690Poʻohū ka lae i ka ʻalā.The forehead is swollen by the smooth waterworn stone.
 [The price is so high that it feels like a lump on the forehead. ʻAlā is often used to refer to money.]
  2691Poʻohū ka lae kahi i ka pōhue.When the forehead lumps, rub it with a gourd.
 [Find the remedy for the problem.]

Poʻokea  (1) 505Hāwele kīlau i ka lemu, ʻāhaʻi ka puaʻa i ka waha; ke hele nei ʻo Poʻokea.Draw the fine loincloth under the buttocks; the pork finds its way into the mouth; Poʻokea now departs.
 [Poʻokea was a very clever thief during the reign of Kahekili of Maui. Whenever he eluded his pursuers, this was his favorite boast. Any reference to one as being a descendant or relative of Poʻokea implies that he is a thief who steals and runs.]

poʻopaʻa  (3) 609He iʻa loaʻa wale nō hoʻi ka poʻopaʻa.A poʻopaʻa is a fish easy to catch.
 [Hard-headed people are fairly common. A play on poʻopaʻa (hard-headed).]
  726He lawaiʻa no ke kai pāpaʻu, he poʻopaʻa ka iʻa e loaʻa.A fisherman in the shallow sea can only catch poʻopaʻa.
 [An untrained, unskilled person is limited in what he can do.]
  1048Hōkai ua lawaiʻa o ke kai pāpaʻu, he poʻopaʻa ka iʻa e hoʻi ai.A fisherman who fools around in shallow water takes home poʻopaʻa fsh.
 [The poʻopaʻa (hard-headed) fish is easily caught with hook and line.]

poʻopoʻo  (1) 1204ʻIke au i kona mau poʻopoʻo.I know all of his nooks.
 [I know all about him, including his family connections, faults, and virtues.]

pōpō ʻauhuhu  (1) 915He pōpō ʻauhuhu.A ball of ʻauhuhu.
 [Said of a sorcerer who prays others to death, or of anything that would cause serious trouble. The ʻauhuhu is a poisonous plant used for stunning fish.]

popoʻi  (1) 1402Kaikoʻo ke awa, popoʻi ka nalu, ʻaʻohe ʻike ʻia ka poʻe nāna i heʻe ka nalu.The harbor is rough, the surf rolls, and the rider of the surf cannot be seen.
 [A stormy circumstance with uncertain results.]

Pōpōkapa  (1) 1601Ka ua Pōpōkapa o Nuʻuanu.The Tapa-bundling rain of Nuuanu.
 [The Pōpōkapa rain is so called because anyone who came up Nuʻuanu Pali from the windward side had to bundle his garments and hold his arms against his chest to keep from getting wet.]

pōpoki  (2) 916He pōpoki nāwaliwali.A weak cat.
 [A weakling.]
  2692Pōpoki hūnā kūkae.Excreta-hiding cat.
 [Usually said in anger of one who wonʻt reveal his own or other peopleʻs wrongdoings.]

pouhana  (1) 1544Ka pouhana.The main post.
 [The person on whom others depend for leadership, guidance, and help — the mainstay of the family or group.]

pōuli  (1) 2423ʻO ka makapō wale nō ka mea hāpapa i ka pōuli.ʻOnly the blind grope in darkness.
 [Said to one who gropes around instead of going directly to the object he is seeking.]

  (8) 579He hina na ka ʻaʻaliʻi kūmakani, he ʻulaʻa me ka lepo.When the wind-resisting ʻaʻaliʻi falls, it lifts the sod up with its roots.
 [A boast: When I, a powerful man, fall, others will fall with me.]
  759Hele nō me ka lima.Take the hands along in going traveling.
 [Be willing to help others when going traveling and not make a burden of yourself.]
  2329Noho i ka uahi pōhina.Sat together in the gray smoke.
 [Said of a teacher and pupils who sat about a smoky fire at night.]
  2523ʻOno kahi ʻao luʻau me ke aloha .A little taro green is delicious when love is present.
 [Even the plainest fare is delicious when there is love.]
  2655Pili i ka paia.Pressed hard against the wall.
 [Deep in trouble.]
  2683Pōʻino nā lāʻau aʻa liʻiliʻi i ka ulu me ka puakala aʻa loloa.Plants with fine roots are harmed when left to grow with the rough, long-rooted thorny ones.
 [Weak-willed persons are often overcome and influenced by the wicked.]

more
2725Puka ka lā, puka me ka hana, i ʻike ʻia ka lālā maloʻo me ka lālā maka.When day arrives, work time arrives too, for it is then that dry branches can be distinguished from green ones.

pū hala  (5) 923He pū hala aʻa kiolea.A hala tree with thin, hanging roots.
 [Said of one who is not strong, like a tree with aerial roots that are not yet imbedded in the earth.]
  924He pū hala uoʻo.A tough [old] pandanus tree.
 [Said of a stingy person. A play on pū hala in Puhala-hua, the name of a man in the 1800s who was known for his thrift and diligence in saving for old age.]
  1596Ka ua peʻe pū hala o Huelo.The rain of Huelo that makes one hide in a hala grove.
  1642Ka wahine alualu pū hala o Kamilo.The hala-pursuing woman of Kamilo.
 [A current comes to Kamilo in Kaʻū from Halaaniani in Puna; whatever is tossed in the sea at Halaaniani floats into Kamilo. Kapua once left her husband in Puna and went to Kaʻū. He missed her so badly that he decided to send her a pretty loincloth she had made him. This might make her think of him and come back. He wrapped the malo around the stem of a hala cluster, tied it securely in place with a cord, and tossed it into the sea. A few days later some women went fishing at Kamilo and noticed a hala cluster bobbing in the water. Kapua was among them. Eagerly they tried to seize it until one of the women succeeded. Kapua watched as the string was untied and the malo unfolded. She knew that it was her husband’s plea to come home, so she returned to Puna.]
  2623Peʻepeʻe pū hala.Hiders among the hala trees.
 [An epithet for the kauā of Hāmākualoa, Maui.]

pū maiʻa  (1) 2349Nui pū maiʻa ʻolohaka o loko.Large banana stalk, all pith inside.
 [Said of a person with a large physique but with no strength to match it.]

pū paʻakai  (1) 375E pū paʻakai aku a paʻa ka houpo.Take a bit of salt till the diaphragm is solid.
 [Said by one whose fare is humble, consisting mostly of poi with salt or kukui relish. “Eat till you are satisfied of this humble fare.”]

pua  (39) 72Aia nō ka pua i luna.The flower is still on the tree.
 [A compliment to an elderly woman. Her beauty still remains.]
  93ʻAkahi ka hoʻi ka paoa, ke kau nei ka mākole pua heʻo.Here is a sign of ill luck, for the red-eyed bright-hued one rests above.
 [Said when a rainbow appears before the path of one who was on a business journey. Such a rainbow is regarded the same as meeting a red-eyed person — a sign of bad luck. Better to turn about and go home.]
  284E hoʻi e peʻe i ke ōpū weuweu me he moho lā. E ao o haʻi ka pua o ka mauʻu iā ʻoe.Go back and hide among the clumps of grass like the wingless rail. Be careful not to break even a blade of grass.
 [Retum to the country to live a humble life and leave no trace to be noticed and followed. So said the chief Keliʻiwahamana to his daughter when he was dying. Later used as advice to a young person not to be aggressive or show off.]
  408Haiamū ka manu i ka pua o ka māmane.The birds gather ahout the māmane blossom.
 [Said of one who is very popular with the opposite sex.]
  409Haʻi ʻē nā pua i ke kula.The flowers of the field look coy and coquettish.
 [Said of a young person who wears a coquettish look when in the presence of one who rouses interest.]
  805He maoli pua lehua i ka wēkiu.An attractive lehua blossom on the topmost branch.
 [An attractive person.]

more pua
920He pua laha ʻole.A flower not common.
 [One who is as choice and highly prized as a very rare blossom. An expression much used in chants and songs.]

pua hau  (1) 1792Kīʻililī ka pua hau o Kalena.The hau blossoms of Kalena squat.
 [Said of pretty young women who squat and do nothing — they are good lookers but not good workers. A play on lena (lazy) in Kalena.]

pua kukui  (1) 695He kiu ka pua kukui na ka makani.The kukui blossoms are a sign of wind.
 [When the kukui trees shed their blossoms, a strong wind is blowing.]

pua mauʻu  (1) 1994Liʻiliʻi kamaliʻi, nunui ka ʻomoʻomo palaoa; liʻiliʻi pua mauʻu kihe ka puka ihu.Small child, but a big loaf of bread; small blade of grass, but it tickles the nostril enough to cause sneezing.
 [Once said by a chiefess in praise of a teenage boy with whom she had an affair, this became a humorous saying throughout the islands.]

puaʻa  (21) 88ʻAi puaʻa a Kukeawe.The pork-eating of Kukeawe.
 [Said of a person who is not satisfied with the number of his own pigs and so robs his neighbors of theirs. Kukeawe was a friend of Kahekili who was allowed to help himself to any of Kahekili’s pigs in Kula, Maui. But Kukeawe also took the pigs belonging to the people of Kula, Honuaʻula, and Kahikinui and plundered their possessions. These people rose in rebellion, led by ʻOpū, and surprised the followers of Kukeawe while they were ascending Haleakalā on the way to Kula. Kukeawe’s party retreated but found their way blocked by other parties led by Kawehena, Kahoʻoluhina, and Kuheana. Kukeawe was killed and his body set up at Palauea for all to see.]
  147ʻAʻohe ʻike o ka puaʻa nona ka imu e hōʻā ʻia nei.The pig does not know that the imu is being lighted for it.
 [Said of a person who is unaware that he is being victimized.]
  166ʻAʻohe komo o kā haʻi puaʻa ke paʻa i ka pā.Other people’s pigs would not come in if the fence were kept in good repair.
 [Be prepared always, and you’ll find yourself free of trouble. Also, evil influence cannot enter when one keeps his own mental realm fortified from within.]
  351E mānalo ka hala o ke kanaka i ka imu o ka puaʻa.The wrongs done by man are atoned for by a pig in the imu.
 [When a person has committed a wrong against others or against the gods, he makes an offering of a hog with prayers of forgiveness.]
  357E nānā mai a uhi kapa ʻeleʻele ia Maui, a kau ka puaʻa i ka nuku, kiʻi mai i ka ʻāina a lawe aku.Watch until the black tapa cloth covers Maui and the sacrificial hog is offered, then come and take the land.
 [Said by Kahekili, ruler of Maui, to a messenger sent by Kamehameha I with a question whether to have war or peace. Kahekili sent back this answer — “Wait until I am dead and all the rites performed, then invade and take the island of Maui.”]
  505Hāwele kīlau i ka lemu, ʻāhaʻi ka puaʻa i ka waha; ke hele nei ʻo Poʻokea.Draw the fine loincloth under the buttocks; the pork finds its way into the mouth; Poʻokea now departs.
 [Poʻokea was a very clever thief during the reign of Kahekili of Maui. Whenever he eluded his pursuers, this was his favorite boast. Any reference to one as being a descendant or relative of Poʻokea implies that he is a thief who steals and runs.]

more puaʻa
681He keʻa puaʻa maka ʻolelepā.A fierce rooting hog.
 [A warrior fierce in battle.]

puaʻa laho  (1) 919He puaʻa laho.A boar.
 [An oversexed man.]

puaʻa wahine  (1) 456Hānai puaʻa wahine, ma loko ka uku.Raise a sow, for her reward is inside of her.
 [A sow will bear young.]

Puaēa  (1) 2694Puaēa ka manu o Kaʻula i ke kai.The bird of Kaʻula expires over the sea.
 [Said of utter destruction, as of birds that drop dead while flying over the sea.]

Puaʻena  (2) 1282Ka ʻehu kai o Puaʻena.The sea sprays of Puaʻena.
 [Wind blows the sea sprays of Puaʻena, Waialua, Oʻahu.]
  1689Ke ʻehu kai o Puaʻena.The sea sprays of Puaʻena.
 [Puaʻena, Waialua, Oʻahu.]

Puahinahina  (1) 118ʻAno kaikoʻo lalo o Kealahula, ua puhia ke ʻala ma Puahinahina.It is somewhat rough down at Kealahula, for the fragrance [of seaweed] is being wafted hither from the direction of Puahinahina.
 [There is a disturbance over there, and we are noticing signs of it here. The breeze carries the smell of seaweed when the water is rough.]

puahiohio  (3) 701He kohu puahiohio i ka hoʻolele i ka lepo i luna.Like a whirlwind, whirling the dust upward.
 [Said of a commoner who makes an attempt to elevate himself so he will be regarded as a chief.]
  2636Piʻi ka lepo i ka makani puahiohio.The dust rises on the whirlwind.
 [Said of a person who elevates himself with his bragging.]
  2940Wili ka puahiohio, piʻi ka lepo i luna.The whirlwind twists, and up goes the dust.
 [With wrath, out come words that are unpleasant to hear.]

puaʻi  (3) 206ʻAʻohe puaʻi leo.Not a sound gushed forth.
 [Not a single word was spoken.]
  343ʻElo ke kuāua o Ualoa; puaʻi i ka lani, kū kele ke one.Drenching is the shower of Ualoa; the heavens overflow to soak the sands.
 [Very wet weather. A play on ua (rain) and loa (very much). Ualoa is a place name.]
  2602Papani ka uka o Kapela; puaʻi hānono wai ʻole o Kukaniloko; pakī hunahuna ʻole o Holoholokū; ʻaʻohe mea nāna e ʻaʻe paepae kapu o Līloa.Close the upland of Kapela; no red water gushes from Kukaniloko; not a particle issues from Holoholokū; there is none to step over the sacred platform of Līloa.
 [The old chiefs and their sacredness are gone; the descendants are no longer laid to rest at Ka-pela-kapu-o-Kakaʻe at ʻīao; the descendants no longer point to Kukaniloko on Oʻahu and Holoholokū on Kauaʻi as the sacred birthplaces; there is no one to tread on the sacred places in Waipiʻo, Hawaiʻi, where Līloa once dwelt.]

puaināwele  (1) 2094Makaliʻi puaināwele ke kai o Keoneʻoʻio.The sea of Keoneʻoʻio is dim and distant.
 [Said of one who feels himself too good for his associates.]

puakala  (1) 2683Pōʻino nā lāʻau aʻa liʻiliʻi i ka ulu pū me ka puakala aʻa loloa.Plants with fine roots are harmed when left to grow with the rough, long-rooted thorny ones.
 [Weak-willed persons are often overcome and influenced by the wicked.]

puakea  (4) 630He ʻili puakea.Skin like a white blossom.
 [Said of a white person.]
  1720Ke kai heʻe nalu o Puakea.The sea of Puakea, where surfing is done.
 [Refers to Puakea, Kohala.]
  2221Nā ʻili puakea o Maleka.The white-blossom skin of Maleka.
 [Said of fair-skinned Americans.]
  2253Nā lehua puakea o Ninauapo.The white lehua blossoms of Ninauapo.
 [White lehua blossoms flourished at Ninauapo in Mānoa, Oʻahu.]

pūʻali  (4) 671He kanu Mahoemua, he kalo pūʻali.When one plants in [the month of] Mahoemua, he will have irregularly shaped taro.
  1894Kū ka pūʻali.His forces are ready.
 [He is ready to get to work.]
  2705Pūʻali kalo i ka wai ʻole.Taro, for lack of water, grows misshapen.
 [For lack of care one may become ill.]
  2706Pūʻali o Ka-hau-nui ia Ka-hau-iki.Big-hau-tree has a groove worn into it by Little-hau-tree.
 [Said when a child nearly wears out the patience of the adult in charge of him, or of a large company of warriors discomfited by a small one. Kahaunui and Kahauiki are places just east of Moanalua, Oʻahu.]

puana  (1) 510He aha ka puana o ka moe?What is the answer to the dream?
 [What will the result of this be?]

puanaiea  (1) 2708Puanaiea ke kanaka ke hele i ka liʻulā.A person who goes after a mirage will only wear himself out.

pūanuanu  (1) 2709Pūanuanu ka hale noho ʻole ʻia e ke kanaka.Cold is an uninhabited house.
 [Said of an empty house, which lacks the warmth of love, or of the body after life is gone.]

puapua  (3) 32Aia a pohā ka leo o ka ʻaʻo, kāpule ke momona o ka ʻuwaʻu i ka puapua.When the ʻaʻo birds’ voices are distinctly heard, the ʻuwaʻu birds are fat even to the very tails.
 [The ʻao bird was not heard during the nesting season. When the fledglings emerged and their cries were heard, the season had come when young ʻuwaʻu were best for eating, and the people went to snare them.]
  381ʻEu kōlea i kona puapua; ʻeu ke kanaka i kona hanu.A plover stirs its tail; a man stirs because of the breath within.
 [Said by Kaʻiana, who led an army in battle under Kamehameha I. When the Puna fighters refused to battle against Keouakuahuʻula because of the close kinship between their own district and Kaʻū, Kaʻiana said this to urge them to think of themselves and their own lives. Encouraged, the warriors resumed fīghting and won the victory for Kamehameha.]
  761He lihi nō paha i laila, ke ʻeuʻeu nei ka puapua.Perhaps [hej has some rights there, to wag his tail feathers [the way he does].
 [He wouldn’t be acting with such confidence if he weren’t related to or a friend of the person higher up.]

puapuaʻa  (1) 1416Kakaʻi ka puapuaʻa i ka mālie, he ʻino.When the piglets follow one after the other in the calm, it is a sign of bad weather.
 [When the clouds called ao puapuaʻa or puaʻa, “pig” clouds, follow one after the other on the mountaintops in calm weather, bad weather is to be expected.]

pue  (1) 2714Pue i ke anu o Hauaʻiliki.Crouch in the cold of Hauaʻiliki.
 [Said of an intense cold. A play on hau (ice) and ʻiliki (strike) in the place name Hauaʻiliki.]

puʻe  (4) 1444Kālina ka pono, ʻaʻohe hua o ka puʻe, aia ka hua i ka lālā.The potato hill is bare of tubers for the plant no longer bears; it is the vines that are now bearing.
 [The mother is no longer bearing, but her children are.]
  2135Mānā, i ka puʻe kalo hoʻoneʻeneʻe a ka wai.Mānā, where the mounded taro moves in the water.
 [Refers to Mānā, Kauaʻi. In ancient days there were five patches at Kolo, Mānā, in which deep water mound-planting was done for taro. As the plants grew, the rootlets were allowed to spread undisturbed because they helped to hold the soil together. When the rainy season came, the whole area was flooded as far as Kalamaihiki, and it took weeks for the water to subside. The farmers built rafts of sticks and rushes, then dived into the water. They worked the bases of the taro mounds free and lifted them carefully, so as not to disturb the soil, to the rafts where they were secured. The weight of the mounds submerged the rafts but permitted the taro stalks to grow above water just as they did before the flood came. The rafts were tied together to form a large, floating field of taro.]
  2290puʻe ʻuala hoʻouai.Movable mounds of sweet potato.
 [It was the custom of Pūlaʻa, Puna, Hawaiʻi, to remove the best mounds of sweet potato, earth and all, to wide strips of thick, coarse lauhala mats stretched out on racks. When a chief came on a visit, these mats were placed on the right-hand side of the road and made kapu. Should he return, the mat-grown potato field was carried to the opposite side of the road so that it would still be on the right of the traveling chief.]
  2291puʻe ʻuala ʻīnaʻi o ke ala loa.The sweet-potato mounds that provide for a long journey.
 [Said of a patch of sweet potatoes whose crops are reserved for a voyage or journey.]

puehu  (4) 2320No Hanamāʻulu ka ipu puehu.The quickly emptied container belongs to Hanamāʻulu.
 [Said of the stingy people of Hanamāʻulu, Kauaʻi — no hospitality there. At one time, food containers would be hidden away and the people of Hanamāʻulu would apologize for having so little to offer their guests.]
  2711Puehu ka hulu o ka manu.The feathers of the bird are scattered.
 [The person has gone off with haste.]
  2712Puehu ka lehu i nā maka o ka mea luhi.Ashes fly into the eyes of the toiler.
 [One must endure the unpleasant in order to gain the pleasant, just as the cook at a fireplace gets ashes into his eyes when he blows on the fire.]
  2713Puehu liʻiliʻi ka lehu o kapuahi.The ashes of the fireplace are scattered in every direction.
 [Said of an angry person whose temper makes everybody scatter.]

Puehuehu  (1) 46Aia i Kohala, i Puehuehu.Gone to Kohala, to Puehuehu.
 [Nothing more is left. Used about someone who has lost everything. A play on puehu (to scatter like fine dust). Also expressed Hoʻi i Kohala i Puehuehu.]

pueo  (4) 207ʻAʻohe pueo keʻu, ʻaʻohe ʻalae kani, ʻaʻohe ʻūlili holoholo kahakai.No owl hoots, no mudhen cries, no ʻūlili runs on the beach.
 [There is perfect peace.]
  667He kama na ka pueo.Offspring of an owl.
 [A child whose sire is unknown, so called because the owl flies at night.]
  2130Malu ke kula, ʻaʻohe keʻu pueo.The plain is quiet; not even the hoot of an owl is heard.
 [All is at peace.]
  2715Pueo maka ʻalaʻalawa.Owl with eyes glancing here and there.
 [Said of one who looks about to see what he can steal.]

pūhā  (2) 2716Pūhā hewa ka honu i ka lā makani.The turtle breathes at the wrong moment on a windy day.
 [Said of a person who says the wrong thing at the wrong time and suffers the result.]
  2717Pūhā ka honu, ua awakea.When the turtle comes up to breathe, it is daylight.
 [Said when a person yawns. Sleeping time is over; work begins.]

pūhai  (1) 845He noni no Kaualehu, he pūhai aʻa.It is a noni tree of Kaualehu whose roots are in shallow ground.
 [Said of a person whose knowledge is shallow. The noni root from shallow ground does not make as good a dye as that from deep ground.]

puhalu  (1) 2718Puhalu ka ihu, nānā i ke kāʻao.When the scent reaches the nose, one sees the overripe hala fruit [fallen to ihe ground].
 [One only notices the many good things a person does when it is too late to show appreciation.]

puheʻe  (1) 925He puheʻe miki.A gripping cuttlefish.
 [A thief.]

puhi  (16) 380E uhi wale nō ʻaʻole e nalo, he imu puhi.No matter how much one covers a steaming imu, the smoke will rise.
 [The secret will get out.]
  634He imu puhi na ka lā o Kalaʻe.Kalaʻe is made a steaming oven by the sun.
 [At Kalaʻe, Molokaʻi, stood an imu that was said to have baked the rain, making it a dry place.]
  661He kai puhi nehu, puhi lala ke kai o ʻEwa.A sea that blows up nehu fish, blows up a quantity of them, is the sea of ʻEwa.
  926He puhi ka iʻa ʻoni i ka lani.The eel is a fish that moves skyward.
 [Niuloahiki, god of coconut trees, had three forms — eel, man, and coconut tree, which reaches skyward. This expression can refer to Niuloahiki or to any influence that rises and becomes overwhelming. When used in hana aloha sorcery, it means that the squirming of love is like the movement of an eel. Also used as a warning — “Beware of that ambitious person who will let nothing stand in his way.”]
  927He puhi ke aloha, he iʻa noho i ke ale.Love is like an eel, the creature that dwells in the sea cavern.
 [Love makes one restless in the mind, like the writhing of an eel.]
  928He puhi kumu one, he iʻa ʻino.An eel of the sand bank is a dangerous creature.
 [Said of eels that can travel on the sand and rocks. Tales are told of eels climbing pandanus trees and dropping on persons resting or sleeping under them. Also said of a dangerous person.]

more puhi
929He puhi makani.Just wind blowing.
 [Said of one who makes promises and never keeps them, or makes threats and never carries them out.]

puhi ahi  (1) 2760Pupule puhi ahi.Crazy person who sets fires.
 [A humorous expression applied to one with an overabundance of energy who does just as he pleases without fear of being criticized. Such a person has so much generosity that he is likeable, even if he sometimes goes to extremes.]

puhia  (1) 118ʻAno kaikoʻo lalo o Kealahula, ua puhia ke ʻala ma Puahinahina.It is somewhat rough down at Kealahula, for the fragrance [of seaweed] is being wafted hither from the direction of Puahinahina.
 [There is a disturbance over there, and we are noticing signs of it here. The breeze carries the smell of seaweed when the water is rough.]

Puhili  (1) 16Ahu kāpeku i ka nalu o Puhili.Much thrashing about in the surf of Puhili.
 [Signifying an abundance of food. Thrashing about in the water drives fish into the nets.]

puhipuhi  (1) 2722Puhipuhi lāʻau a kahuna, ka maunu loaʻa a ka pupuka.By blowing the medicine given by a kahuna, can the ugly gain his desire.
 [Said of one who resorted to the prayers and ceremonies of a kahuna hana aloha to gain the love of his desired one. The person consulting the kahuna ate pilimai and manulele sugar cane after the kahuna had dedicated them to Makanikeoe, the love god. Then he blew in the direction of the desired person. The god, who also had a wind form, bore the mana along, and when it touched the one desired he or she became very much in love with the sender. When used with evil intent — for revenge or to humiliate — the sender is spoken of as an ugly person who has no charm of his own, hence he must resort to sorcery.]

pūhiʻu  (1) 89ʻAi pūhiʻu.Eats while breaking wind.
 [Said of a bad-mannered person with no regard for ceremony.]

puʻipuʻi  (1) 2723Puʻipuʻi a ka lawaiʻa.Stout fishing lad.
 [Said of an energetic fisherman. ʻUmi was so called because of his skill in fishing.]

pūʻiwa  (1) 2724Pūʻiwa i ka lāʻau pākuʻikuʻi a ka lawaiʻa.Frightened by the splashing stick of the fisherman.
 [Said of those who are suddenly frightened and flee in panic, like fish driven into the net by the stick that beats the water.]

puka  (14) 1249I paʻa iā ia ʻaʻole ʻoe e puka.If it had ended with him [or her] you would not be here.
 [Said to a younger sibling to encourage more respect for an elder.]
  1250I paʻa i ka hānau mua, ʻaʻole e puka nā pōkiʻi.Had the mother died in bearing the oldest, all the others would not have been born.
 [Said in reminding brothers and sisters to respect the hiapo (eldest).]
  1251I paʻa i kona kupuna ʻaʻole kākou e puka.Had our ancestress died in bearing our grandparent, we would not have come forth.
 [Said to remind a member of the family to respect the senior line, because they came first. Also expressed I paʻa i kona makua....]
  1307Kāhihi ka puka o ka hale i ka pūnāwelewele.Cobwebs spread over the door of the house.
  1514Ka ʻōlohe puka awakea o Kamaʻomaʻo.The bare one of Kamaʻomaʻo that appears at noonday.
 [The plain of Kamaomao, Maui, is said to be the haunt of ghosts (ʻōlohe) who appear at night or at noon. Also a play on ʻōlohe (nude), applied to one who appears unclothed.]
  1661Ka wai puka iki o Helani.The water of Helani that comes from a small opening.
 [Refers to Helani, Kona, Hawaiʻi. Here a coconut grove thrived, and from a small opening in the shell of the nut one could get water to drink.]

more puka
2171Moe kūpuna i ka mamo, a puka hou mai nō nā mamo.Ancestors slept with descendants, and more descendants were born.
 [Said when a girl mates with a supernatural lover in a dream and later bears him a child. The lover might be a family ʻaumakua, hence the reference to an ancestor.]

puka ihu  (4) 73Aia nō ke ea i ka puka ihu.The breath is still in the nostrils.
 [A facetious reply when someone asks how a friend or relative is.]
  600He huluhulu kau i ka puka ihu.Hair growing inside of the nostril.
 [Said in envy of a person who is regarded as a favorite by a superior — he is so closely allied to the person that he is likened to a hair in the other’s nostril. Also said in criticism of one who is made too much of.]
  1206ʻIke ʻia aʻe nō ma ka huluhulu kau i ka puka ihu.Attention is paid only to the hairs of the nostrils.
 [Attention is paid to the favored few whom one does not like to offend.]
  1994Liʻiliʻi kamaliʻi, nunui ka ʻomoʻomo palaoa; liʻiliʻi pua mauʻu kihe ka puka ihu.Small child, but a big loaf of bread; small blade of grass, but it tickles the nostril enough to cause sneezing.
 [Once said by a chiefess in praise of a teenage boy with whom she had an affair, this became a humorous saying throughout the islands.]

puka kahiko  (1) 1546Ka puka kahiko.The ancient hole.
 [The anus. According to ancient legend, man did not have an anus and was not physically strong and well until Māui, the demigod, made the opening for him.]

puka uahi  (1) 1387Kaiehu ʻia a pulu ka puka uahi.The sea tosses up the sprays, wetting the smokestack.
 [Said of a towering rage.]

pūkākā  (1) 2727Pūkākā nā lehua o Mānā, ʻauwana wale iho nō i ka ʻauwai pakī.Scattered are the warriors of Mānā, who go wandering along the ditch that holds little water.
 [A boast after winning a battle.]

pukana  (1) 2731Pukana wai o Kahuku.The water outlet of Kahuku.
 [Refers to the outlet of an underground stream that once flowed from Kahuku to Waipahu, Oʻahu.]

pūkē  (1) 1202I ke alo nō o ka lawaiʻa lā a pūkē hewa nā leho, haki wale nā kākala.It was right in front of the fishermen that the cowry shells came together violently and the spikes broke off.
 [In spite of watchfulness, trouble occurs. The leho is a cowry-shell octopus lure fashioned with a spike on it.]

pūkoʻa  (4) 905He poʻi na kai uli, kai koʻo, ʻaʻohe hina pūkoʻa.Though the sea he deep and rough, the coral rock remains standing.
 [Said of one who remains calm in the face of difficulty.]
  932He pūkoʻa kani ʻāina.A coral reef that grows into an island.
 [A person beginning in a small way gains steadily until he becomes firmly established.]
  933He pūkoʻa kū no ka moana.A large rock standing in the sea.
 [Said of a person who is unchangeable and very determined.]
  2732Pūkoʻa kani ʻāina.A hard rock of the land.
 [Said of a strong fighter who destroys others but is himself impossible to destroy.]

pula  (4) 267E ʻau mālie i ke kai pāpaʻu, o pakī ka wai a pula ka maka.Swim quietly in shallow water lest it splash into the eyes.
 [A cautioning to go carefully where one isn’t sure of conditions.]
  625He iki huna lepo mai kēia e pula ai ka maka.This is a small speck of dust that causes a roughness in the eye.
 [One may be small but he can still cause distress. This was the retort of Kaʻehuiki, a shark-god of Puna, when he was taunted for his small size by Kaiʻanuilalawalu, shark-god of Kīpahulu, Maui.]
  934He pula, ʻo ka ʻānai ka mea nui.A speck of dust in the eye causes a lot of rubbing because of irritation.
 [Let one member of a family do wrong and, like the resultant irritation, he is a shame to all.]
  2733Pula kau maka ʻino loa.A very bad mote in the eye.
 [A person who is much disliked. Pula kau maka denotes something that is constantly on oneʻs mind.]

pūlale  (1) 360E nihi ka helena i ka uka o Puna; mai pūlale i ka ʻike a ka maka.Go quietly in the upland of Puna; do not let anything you see excite you.
 [Watch your step and don’t let the things you see lead you into trouble. There is an abundance of flowers and berries in the uplands of Puna and it is thought that picking any on the trip up to the volcano will result in being caught in heavy rains; the picking is left until the return trip. Also said to loved ones to imply, “Go carefully and be mindful.”]

pulama  (1) 978He waiwai nui ke aloha; o kaʻu nō ia e pulama nei.Love is a great treasure which I cherish.
 [A common expression in chants and songs.]

pule  (5) 115Alu ka pule i Hakalau.Concentrate your prayers on Hakalau.
 [Whenever concentration and united effort are required, this saying is used. A sorcerer at Hakalau once created havoc in his own and other neighborhoods. Many attempts to counter-pray him failed until a visiting kahuna suggested that all of the others band together to concentrate on the common enemy. This time they succeeded.]
  374E pule wale nō i ka lā o ka make, ʻaʻole e ola.Prayers uttered on the day of death will not save one.
 [Said by Lohiʻau to Hiʻiaka.]
  699He koʻe ka pule a kahuna, he moe nō a ʻoni mai.The prayer of a kahuna is like a worm; it may lie dormant but it will wriggle along.
 [Though the prayer of a kahuna may not take effect at once, it will in time.]
  1196I ka pule nō o Lohiʻau a make.Lohiʻau was still praying when he died.
 [Said of one who waits until he is face to face with death before beginning to pray.]
  2195Molokaʻi pule oʻo.Molokaʻi of the potent prayers.
 [Molokaʻi is noted for its sorcery, which can heal or destroy.]

pūlehu  (2) 820He moʻa no ka ʻai i ka pūlehu ʻia; he ahi nui aha ia e hoʻā ai?Food can be cooked in the embers; why should a big fire be lighted?
 [A small love affair will do; why assume the responsibilities of a permanent mating? Said by those who prefer to love and leave.]
  1505Ka nui e moʻa ai ka pūlehu.The size when one is old enough to broil food.
 [Old enough to have a mate.]

puleileho  (1) 2734Puleileho ke kai o Kāʻelo.A rough sea in the month of Kāʻelo.
 [When the seaweed breaks loose and is borne shoreward, fish that feed on it are drawn there. So a rough sea can be good for the fishermen.]

pulelo  (3) 2392ʻŌʻili pulelo ke ahi o Kāmaile.The fire of Kāmaile rises in triumph.
 [Said of one who is victorious over obstacles, this is the first line of a chant composed for Kamehameha II. In olden days, firebrands hurled from the cliffʻs at Hāʻena, Kauaʻi, made a spectacular sight.]
  2735Pulelo ke ahi haʻaheo i nā pali.The firebrand soars proudly over the cliffs.
 [An expression of triumph. Referring to the firebrand hurling of Kauaʻi, or to the glow of volcanic fire on Hawaiʻi.]
  2736Pulelo ke ahi o Makuaiki.The firebrand of Makuaiki rises triumphant.
 [Said of one who rises from obscurity or gains a victory.]

pūloa  (1) 958He uli na ka heʻe pūloa.It is ink from the long-headed octopus.
 [Said of a person clever at getting away with mischief. The ink of the octopus is its camouflage.]

pulu  (16) 136ʻAʻohe e pulu, he waʻa nui.One will not be wet on a large canoe.
 [One is safe in the protection of an important person.]
  273E hakoko ana ʻo Heneli me Keoni Pulu; ua lilo ke eo iā Keoni Pulu.Henry and John Bull wrestle; John Bull wins.
 [Hunger is routed by filling the stomach. Henry (Hunger) and John Bull (Fullness) wrestle until John Bull wins the match.]
  649He kāʻeʻaʻeʻa pulu ʻole no ka heʻe nalu.An expert on the surfboard who does not get wet.
 [Praise of an outstanding surfer.]
  775He lupe lele a pulu i ka ua ʻawa.A kite that flies till it is dampened by icy cold raindrops.
 [Said of a person whose station has risen very high.]
  1231I lima nō ka ua, wehe ʻē ke pulu o lalo.While the rain is still in the sky, clear the field below.
 [In dry places, farmers cleared the fields when they saw signs of rain so the water would soak the earth.]
  1387Kaiehu ʻia a pulu ka puka uahi.The sea tosses up the sprays, wetting the smokestack.
 [Said of a towering rage.]

more pulu
1807Kīpū loa o Keoni Pulu i ka hoe.John Bull still holds fast to the oar.
 [He is still full and wants nothing more to eat. A play on Pulu, Hawaiianized from the English “full” and “Bull.”]

pulu niu  (1) 2394ʻO ka ʻaʻama holo pali pōhaku, e paʻa ana ia i ka ʻahele pulu niu.The crab that runs about on a rocky cliff will surely be caught with a snare of coconut fibers.
 [He who goes where he tempts trouble is bound to suffer.]

Pulukāʻelo  (1) 2401ʻO Kāʻelo ke kāne, Pulukāʻelo ka wahine, hānau mai keiki kāpulu.Kāʻelo is the husband, Pulu-kāʻelo (Well-drenched) the wife; children born to them are filthy.
 [Said of a filthy person. A play on ʻelo (soak). The month of Kāʻelo is rainy and muddy.]

pulupulu  (2) 2659Pipī ka wahie, hoʻonui ka pulupulu.If the firewood burns slowly, add more tinder.
 [Keep trying until you succeed.]
  2742Pulupulu ahi.A fire-starter.
 [Said of one whose temper flares easily.]

pūmaiʻa  (1) 935He pūmaiʻa: loaʻa i ke kīkīao, hina.A banana stump: when a gust of wind comes, it falls.
 [A weakling who is blown down by every trouble that comes.]

pumehana  (1) 2743Pumehana ka hale i ka noho ʻia e ka makua.Warm is the home in which a parent lives.

Puna  (35) 37Aia i Hilo ʻo Alanaio; aia i Puna ʻo Kapoho; aia i Laupāhoehoe ʻo Ulekiʻi.In Hilo is Alanaio; in Puna is Kapoho; in Laupāhoehoe is Ulekii.
 [A vulgar play on place names, calling attention to private parts, which are omens of disappointment when seen in dreams. An expression of contempt for one who brings bad luck. Alanaio (Way-of-the-pinworm), the anus, is in Hilo; Kapoho (The Container), the vagina, is in Puna; and Ulekiʻi (Rigid Penis) is in Laupāhoehoe.]
  233ʻĀpiki Puna i Leleʻapiki, ke nānā lā i Nānāwale.Puna is concerned at Leleʻapiki and looks about at Nānāwale.
 [The people are but followers and obedient to their rulers. The people of Puna were not anxious to go to war when a battle was declared between Kiwalaʻō and Kamehameha; it was the will of their chief. Lele-ʻapiki (Tricky-leap) and Nānā-wale (Just-looking) are places in Puna.]
  246ʻAwa kau lāʻau o Puna.Tree-growing ʻawa of Puna.
 [Tree-grown ʻawa of Puna was famous for its potency. It was believed that birds carried pieces of ʻawa up into the trees where it would grow.]
  260E ala e Kaʻū, kahiko o Mākaha; e ala e Puna, Puna Kumākaha; e ala e Hilo naʻau kele!Arise, O Kaʻū of ancient descent; arise, O Puna of the Kumākaha group; arise, O Hilo of the water-soaked foundation!
 [A rallying call. These names are found in Kaʻū and Puna chants of the chiefs. The Mākaha and Ku-mākaha (Like-the-Mākaha) were originally one. Some moved to Puna and took the name Kumākaha.]
  360E nihi ka helena i ka uka o Puna; mai pūlale i ka ʻike a ka maka.Go quietly in the upland of Puna; do not let anything you see excite you.
 [Watch your step and don’t let the things you see lead you into trouble. There is an abundance of flowers and berries in the uplands of Puna and it is thought that picking any on the trip up to the volcano will result in being caught in heavy rains; the picking is left until the return trip. Also said to loved ones to imply, “Go carefully and be mindful.”]
  397Haʻalele i Puna nā hoaloha ʻē.Left in Puna are the friends.
 [Said of one who has deserted his friends. Originally said of Hiʻiaka when she left Puna.]

more Puna
444Hamohamo i ke kualā o Puna.Pats the dorsal fin of Puna.
 [Said of one who is verbally ambitious but does nothing to attain his goal, or of one who is full of flattery and false promises.]

Punahoa  (4) 171ʻAʻohe lihi ʻike aku i ka nani o Punahoa.Hasn’t known the beauty of Punahoa.
 [Used when the charms of a person or place are unknown. Punahoa is an unusually attractive place.]
  2305Neʻe aku, neʻe mai ke one o Punahoa.That way and this way shifts the sand of Punahoa.
 [Said of a group that divides, or of an undecided person who shifts one way and then another.]
  2306Neʻe papa ka helu a ka lā i Punahoa.The sun continued to scorch at Punahoa.
 [The fight didn’t end quickly.]
  2548ʻO Wananalua ia ʻāina; ʻo Punahoa ka wai; ʻo Kaʻuiki ka puʻu.Wananalua is the land; Punahoa is the pool; Kaʻuiki is the hill.
 [Noted places in Hāna.]

Punaluʻu  (4) 1569Ka ua kīkē hala o Punaluʻu.The hala-pelting rain of Punaluu.
 [Refers to the rain at Punaluʻu, Oʻahu.]
  1887Kū ka hale i Punaluʻu, i Ka-wai-hū-o-Kauila.The house stands at Punaluʻu, at the gushing water of Kauila.
 [Said of one who has found peace and comfort at last. Ka-wai-hū-o-Kauila is a spring, the gift of a turtle goddess to the people of Punaluʻu, Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi. The people of that locality feared the cannibal woman Kaikapū, who lived near their best springs. In order to avoid her and obtain water, they dived to the sea floor where fresh water bubbled up — hence the name Puna-luʻu (Water-dived-for). Seeing their difficulty, a turtle goddess created this spring.]
  2380ʻOhuʻohu Punaluʻu i Ka-wai-hū-o-Kauila.Punaluʻu is adorned by the rushing water of Kauila.
 [Refers to Punaluʻu, Kaʻū.]
  2746Punaluʻu, i ke kai kau haʻa a ka malihini.Punaluu, where the sea dances for the visitors.
 [Punaluʻu, Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi, is said to be the place where the sea dances to delight visitors.]

pūnana  (4) 516He aikāne, he pūnana na ke onaona.A friend, a nest of fragrance.
 [Sweet indeed is a good friend.]
  1995Liʻiliʻi manu ʻai laiki, akamai i ka hana pūnana.Small is the rice bird but an expert in nest building.
 [He may be insignificant but he’s a good worker.]
  2018Loaʻa pono ka ʻiole i ka pūnana.The rat was caught right in the nest
 [The fellow was caught red-handed.]
  2514ʻO nā hōkū o ka lani kai ʻike iā Pae. Aia a loaʻa ka pūnana o ke kōlea, loaʻa ʻo ia iā ʻoe.Only the stars of heaven know where Pae is. When you find a plover’s nest, then you will find him.
 [Said of something so well hidden that it will not be found. Pae was a priest in the reign of ʻUmi. He was so lucky in fishing that the chief desired his bones for fishhooks after his death. When Pae died, his sons hid his bones so well that none of the chiefs and priests could find them. The sons would say, “When you find the nest of the plover, then will you find him.” But ʻUmi enlisted the help of a noted priest of Kauaʻi, who saw the ghost of Pae drinking from a spring in Waimanu Valley. Thus were the bones of Pae found and made into fishhooks for the chief. The sons of Pae were reminded that the chief was using their father’s bones for hooks by his constant cry, “O Pae, hold fast to our fish!”]

pūnāwai  (2) 936He pūnāwai kahe wale ke aloha.Love is a spring that flows freely.
 [Love is without bounds and exists for all.]
  2608Pau ka wai o ia pūnāwai, ke piʻi maila ka huʻahuʻa lepo.The water is gone from that spring, for only muddy foam arises.
 [Said of a mudslinger. First uttered by the Reverend George B. Rowell on Kauaʻi.]

pūnāwelewele  (1) 1307Kāhihi ka puka o ka hale i ka pūnāwelewele.Cobwebs spread over the door of the house.

puni  (6) 937He puni kauoha.A fondness by request.
 [A dying person might will to a relative his fondness for a certain food or activity. After his death, the relative would eat or do the thing until he grew to be as fond of it as the dead person had been. This was called a puni kauoha.]
  1173I ʻike ʻoe iā Kauaʻi a puni a ʻike ʻole iā Kauaʻi-iki, ʻaʻole nō ʻoe i ʻike iā Kauaʻi.If you have seen all of the places on the island of Kauaʻi and have not seen Little Kauaʻi, you have not seen the whole of Kauaʻi.
 [Kauaʻi-iki (Little Kauaʻi) is a stone that stood in a taro patch at Wahiawa, Kauaʻi. When it was threatened with destruction by the building of a road, it was rescued by Walter McBryde and taken to Maiʻaloa and later to Kukuiolono Park, where it stands today.]
  1257I puni iā ʻoe o Kaʻū a i ʻike ʻole ʻoe iā Kaʻūloa, ʻaʻohe nō ʻoe i ʻike iā Kaʻū.If you have been around Kaʻū and have not seen Kaʻūloa, you have not seen the whole of the district. Kaʻūloa and Waiōhinu were two stones, wife and husband, that stood in a kukui grove on the upper side of the road between Na’alehu and Waiōhinu. With the passing of time, these stones gradually sank until they vanished completely into the earth. After Kaʻūloa was no longer seen, Palahemo was substituted as the chief point of interest.
  1258I puni iā ʻoe o Lānaʻi a i ʻike ʻole iā Lānaʻi-Kaʻula me Lānaʻi-Hale, ʻaʻohe nō ʻoe i ʻike iā Lānaʻi.If you have gone around Lānaʻi, and have not seen Lānaʻi Kaʻula and Lānaʻi Hale, you have not seen all of Lānaʻi.
  1489Ka moku puni kuapuʻu.The hunchbacked island.
 [Maui. Its shape on the map resembles the figure of a hunchbacked person.]
  2085Mai puni aku o hei i ka ʻupena a ka Lawakua.Do not helieve it or youll he caught in the net of the Lawakua wind.
 [Why believe all that? It is only wind.]

puni wale  (1) 2077Mai lilo ʻoe i puni wale, o lilo ʻoe i kamaliʻi.Do not believe all that is told you lest you be [led as] a little child.
 [Do not be gullible; scan, weigh, and think for yourself.]

punia  (1) 2044Mai hahaki ʻoe i ka ʻōhelo o punia i ka ua noe.Do not pluck the ʻōhelo berries lest we be surrounded by rain and fog.
 [A warning not to do anything that would result in trouble. It is kapu to pluck ʻōhelo berries on the way to the crater of Kīlauea. To do so would cause the rain and fog to come and one would lose his way. It is permissible to pick them at the crater if the first ʻōhelo is tossed into the fire of Pele. Then, on the homeward way, one may pick as he pleases.]

pūnua  (1) 1547Ka pūnua peʻe poli.The fledgling that hides in the bosom.
 [A young sweetheart.]

pūnuku  (1) 1254I pīʻena ka lio i ka pūnuku; e komo kaula waha ʻia ka maikaʻi.The horse shies at the halter; better use the bridle.
 [Advice not to suppress the activities of a wild-behaving person all at once, but to tame him gradually.]

puoho  (1) 2920Wawā ka menehune i Puʻukapele ma Kauaʻi, puoho ka manu o ka loko o Kawainui ma Oʻahu.The shouts of the menehune on Puukapele on Kauai startled the birds of Kawainui Pond on Oʻahu.
 [The menehune were once so numerous on Kaua’i that their shouting could be heard on O’ahu. Said of too much boisterous talking.]

pūʻolo  (3) 1045Hoʻi pūʻolo nō o kahi aliʻi.One returns with a bundle from the place of the chief.
 [When one visits the home of a generous chief, one always receives a gift.]
  1157I hele i kauhale, paʻa pūʻolo i ka lima.In going to the houses of others, carry a package in the hand.
 [Take a gift.]
  2750Pūʻolo waimaka a ke aloha.Tears [are] bundles of love.
 [Love brings tears to the eyes.]

pupū  (1) 2759Pupu ke kai i ka ʻalalauwā.The sea is so thick with ʻalalauwā fish that it is difficult to make a passage.
 [Said of a situation where it is difficult to make progress.]

pūpū  (4) 307Eia ʻo Kuʻiʻaki me Huanu ke hana nei i ka lāua hana o ka ʻohi ʻiʻo pūpū.Here are Kuʻiʻaki and Huanu doing their work gathering shellfish.
 [An intense cold. A play on Kuʻi-ʻaki (Gritting-the-molars) and Hu-anu (Overflowing-cold). Huanu is Hawaiian for Juan.]
  907He pō Kāloa kēia, ua ʻeʻe pūpū.This is the night of Kāloa, for the shellfish climbs.
 [The nights of Kāloa, when the shellfish climb onto the wet stones, are good for shellfish hunting.]
  1676Ke ala pūpū i Molokaʻi.The path of seashells of Molokaʻi.
 [Among the noted things made by Kihaapiʻilani, ruler of Maui, was a paved road lined with seashells at Kaluakoʻi, Molokaʻi.]
  2762Pūpū wahi kūʻōʻō ka mahiʻai o uka, ola nō ia kini he mahiʻai na ka ʻōiwi.When the upland farmer gathers small, broken sweet potatoes there is life for many, though he only farms for himself.
 [A farmer shares with beach dwellers.]

pupuhi  (7) 7ʻĀhaʻi lā i ka pupuhi.Away like a gust [of wind].
 [Travel with the speed of wind.]
  2751Pupuhi ka heʻe o kai uli.The octopus of the deep spews its ink [into the water].
 [Said of one who goes off in secret or on an errand that rouses unsatisfied curiosity in others. The octopus escapes from its foes by spewing its ink and darkening the water.]
  2752Pupuhi ka iʻa o Ukoʻa.The fish of Ukoʻa is gone.
 [Ukoʻa is a famous pond in Waialua, Oʻahu. Said of one who takes flight or of something quickly and secretly taken.]
  2753Pupuhi ka ʻulu o Keʻei; ua koe ka ʻaʻaiole.The breadfruit of Keʻei are gone; only those blown down by the wind are left.
 [Said when something mysteriously vanishes. A konohiki of Keʻei in Kona, Hawaiʻi, was placed in charge of a fine breadfruit grove. In spite of his watchfulness, the fruit were stolen as soon as they matured. Secretly he asked all of his relatives to help him watch for the culprit. However, some were related to the thief as well, who learned about the watch and evaded capture. Long after, a slip of the tongue revealed the thief.]
  2754Pupuhi ka umu, moʻa pala ka ʻai.When the umu smokes, the food is underdone.
 [Not enough steam remains inside to cook the food. Said of one who does a lot of enthusiastic talking but canʻt knuckle down to business.]
  2755Pupuhi kukui — malino ke kai.Spewed kukui nuts — calm sea.
 [To calm the water, fishermen chewed kukui nuts and spewed them. It has the same meaning as, “Pour oil on troubled waters.”]
  2756Pupuhi kukui o Papalaua, he ʻino.Light the candle of Papalaua, the weather is had.
 [Said of Papalaua, Molokaʻi, where the sun shines for only part of the day. When the weather was bad the valley became dark before the day was gone, and candles had to be lighted. Sometimes said facetiously when a day is gloomy and a light is required to see.]

pupuka  (5) 373E pili mai auaneʻi ia pupuka iaʻu!That homeliness will not attach itself to me!
 [Ugliness is not contagious. Said by a good-looking person in answer to, “I wonder why a handsome person like you should have such a homely mate.”]
  1049Holāholā wale ʻia aʻe nō a pau ka pupuka.It will all he stripped away until all the ugliness is gone.
 [Said in answer to a remark that a small child is ugly.]
  2233Na ka pupuka ka lili.Jealousy belongs to the ugly.
  2722Puhipuhi lāʻau a kahuna, ka maunu loaʻa a ka pupuka.By blowing the medicine given by a kahuna, can the ugly gain his desire.
 [Said of one who resorted to the prayers and ceremonies of a kahuna hana aloha to gain the love of his desired one. The person consulting the kahuna ate pilimai and manulele sugar cane after the kahuna had dedicated them to Makanikeoe, the love god. Then he blew in the direction of the desired person. The god, who also had a wind form, bore the mana along, and when it touched the one desired he or she became very much in love with the sender. When used with evil intent — for revenge or to humiliate — the sender is spoken of as an ugly person who has no charm of his own, hence he must resort to sorcery.]
  2757Pupuka auaneʻi, he inoa ʻala.Homely he may be, but his name is fragrant.
 [He bears an honorable name.]

pūpūkahi  (2) 376E pūpūkahi.Be of one clump.
 [Be united in thought.]
  2758Pūpūkahi i holomua.Unite in order to progress.

pupule  (1) 2760Pupule puhi ahi.Crazy person who sets fires.
 [A humorous expression applied to one with an overabundance of energy who does just as he pleases without fear of being criticized. Such a person has so much generosity that he is likeable, even if he sometimes goes to extremes.]

pupuʻu  (2) 1020Hoa pupuʻu o ka pō anu.A companion to crouch with on a cold night.
 [A sweetheart or spouse.]
  2761Pupuʻu hoʻolei loa, a noho ana!A humping up and a fling, and there he was!
 [Said of one who traveled very swiftly — as though he had flung himself through the air.]

puʻu  (18) 4A aloha wale ʻia kā hoʻi o Kaunuohua, he puʻu wale nō.Even Kaunuohua, a hill, is loved.
 [If a hill can be loved, how much more so a human?]
  54Aia ka puʻu nui i ke alo.A big hill stands right before him.
 [He has a problem.]
  75ʻAi a puʻu ka nuku.Eat till the lips protrude.
 [Eat until one can take no more.]
  208ʻAʻohe puʻu, ʻaʻohe keʻe.No humps, no bends.
 [Said of a person who is physically perfect.]
  209ʻAʻohe puʻu kiʻekiʻe ke hoʻāʻo ʻia e piʻi.No cliff is so tall that it cannot be scaled.
 [No problem is too great when one tries hard to solve it.]
  377E puʻu auaneʻi ka lae i ka ua o Kawaupuʻu, i ka hoʻopaʻa a ka hōʻakamai.The forehead is likely to be lumped by the rain of Kawaupuu if one insists on being a smarty.
 [A warning not to get cocky or smart lest one be hurt. A play on puʻu (lump).]

more puʻu
939He puʻu pale ia lae na ka hoʻokele.The cape is just something to be passed by the canoeman.
 [A boast — difficulties are mere trifles to an expert.]

puʻua  (1) 2763Puʻua i ka hala o Kekaha.Choked on the hala fruit of Kekaha.
 [Pregnant.]

Puʻuhale  (1) 1732Ke kai nehe o Puʻuhale.The murmuring sea of Puuhale.
 [The sea at Puʻuhale in Kalihi, Oʻahu, was said to murmur softly as it washed ashore. There were once many fishponds there.]

Puʻuhele  (1) 1494Ka nalu heʻe o Puʻuhele.The surf of Puuhele that is ridden.
 [Puʻuhele is a place in Hāna, Maui, where there is good surfing.]

Puʻukapele  (2) 686He keiki kālai hoe na ka uka o Puʻukapele.A paddle-making youth of Puuʻkapele.
 [A complimentary expression. He who lives in the uplands, where good trees grow, can make good paddles Puʻukapele is a place above Waimea Canyon on Kauaʻi.]
  2920Wawā ka menehune i Puʻukapele ma Kauaʻi, puoho ka manu o ka loko o Kawainui ma Oʻahu.The shouts of the menehune on Puukapele on Kauai startled the birds of Kawainui Pond on Oʻahu.
 [The menehune were once so numerous on Kaua’i that their shouting could be heard on O’ahu. Said of too much boisterous talking.]

Pūʻula  (1) 400Haʻalele wale iho nō i ke kula o Pūʻula.For no reason he leaves the plain of Pūʻula.
 [He goes off in a huff for no reason at all. A play on puʻu, or puʻu ka nuku (to pout). Pūʻula is a place in Puna, Hawaiʻi.]

Puʻulena  (1) 424Hala ka Puʻulena aia i Hilo ua ʻimi akula iā Papalauahi.The Puʻulena breeze is gone to Hilo in search of Papalauahi.
 [Said of one who has gone away or of one who finds himself too late to do anything.]

puʻulīʻulī  (2) 1448Ka lonolau no i ka lonolau; ka puʻulīʻulī no i ka puʻulīʻulī.The large gourds to the large gourds; the little gourds to the little gourds.
 [In battle, chiefs attack chiefs and commoners fight commoners. Also, chiefs seek the society of chiefs, commoners the society of commoners.]

Puʻuloa  (5) 105Alahula Puʻuloa, he alahele na Kaʻahupāhau.Everywhere in Puʻuloa is the trail of Kaʻahupāhau.
 [Said of a person who goes everywhere, looking, peering, seeing all, or of a person familiar with every nook and corner of a place. Kaʻahupāhau is the shark goddess of Puʻuloa (Pearl Harbor) who guarded the people from being molested by sharks. She moved about, constantly watching.]
  1023Hoʻi akula kaʻōpua i ke awa lau o Puʻuloa.The horizon cloud has gone back to the lochs of Puuloa.
 [He has gone home to stay, like the horizon clouds that settle in their customary places.]
  1439Kālele ka uahi o Puʻuloa.The smoke of Puuloa leans over.
 [Said in amusement of one who leans over, intent on his work.]
  1686Ke awa lau o Puʻuloa.The many-harbored sea of Puuloa.
 [Puʻuloa is an early name for Pearl Harbor.]
  2152Mehameha wale nō ʻo Puʻuloa, i ka hele a Kaʻahupāhau.Puuloa hecame lonely when Kaʻahupāhau went away.
 [The home is lonely when a loved one has gone. Kaʻahupāhau, guardian shark of Puʻuloa (Pearl Harbor), was dearly loved by the people.]

Puʻunui  (1) 1490Ka mū ʻai paka o Puʻunui.The tobacco-eating bug of Puʻunui.
 [Said of one who is a pest. Puʻunui is now a part of Honoluiu.]

Puʻuohau  (2) 1839Kona ʻākau, mai Keahualono a Puʻuohau.North Kona,from Keahualono to Puʻuohau.
 [The boundary of North Kona, Hawaiʻi.]
  1840Kona hema, mai Puʻuohau a Kaheawai.South Kona from Puʻuohau to Kaheawai.
 [The boundaries of South Kona.]

puʻupā  (2) 938He puʻupā hiolo wale nō i ka leo.An obstructing wall falling down at the sound of the voice.
 [Said of stubbornness and obstinacy that are removed by gentle coaxing.]
  2172Moe lāpuʻu i ke anu o Puʻupā.Sleep curled up in the cold of Puʻupā.
 [Said of a person who sleeps with legs drawn up, as with cold. Also said in derision about one who likes to sleep.]

puʻupuʻu  (1) 2765Puʻupuʻu lei pali i ka ʻāʻī.An imperfect lei, beautifed by wearing.
 [Even an imperfect lei looks beautiful when worn around the neck — as beautiful as flowers and greenery on the slope of a hill.]

puʻuwai  (2) 392Haʻaleʻale i ka puʻuwai.A heart full to the brim [with love].
  2766Puʻuwai hao kila.Heart of steel.
 [Fearless.]

puwalu  (1) 940He puwalu, ke kū nei ka lāhea.It is a puwalu fish, for a strong odor is noticed.
 [A rude remark about a person with strong body odor. Sometimes the palani fish is mentioned instead of puwalu.]

pūweuweu  (1) 2158Minamina ka leo o ke aliʻi i ka hāʻule i ka pūweuweu.A pity to allow the words of the chief to fall among the clumps of grass.
 [A reminder to heed the commands and wishes of one’s chief.]

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