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Yapese Text 4

Reeb ea Yaat ko Maabgol - Story of a Married Couple

From school texts produced in Yap by the Education Department curriculum writers, 1976-84.

 Reeb ea Yaat ko MaabgolStory of a Married Couple
1. Qimmoey ruw i maabgol ni ra m’aageew ea maabgol roorow nga roeg-eew nga tabinaew roorow ni nga ra maabgol gow, ma kii yib ea chiitamangin ngea chiitinangin fa chii piin nga ku ra chuweeg-eew fa chii piin nga ni yaen ni piiq i figirngiy yugu beaq. Once upon a time there were a couple who agreed to marry one another and decided to tell their families they were going to do this; but the father and mother of the woman intended to take the woman away and marry her to someone else.
2. Qimmoey ba binaew kaakaroom ni yaed maa feek buulyal. Baay i baleayaal’ ma ni yaen nga reeb ea binaew nga ni yaen ni feek ea buulyal riy ko bii rooraed neam. Nga qu ra thiin gaed, ma yaed bea paer mea kaakadbuul ma ni gëy ea langad ngea quchub ngea ti ni ngea yog ko fa pi buulyal, nga ni piiq ngooraed ma yaed suul nga tafearaed. There was once a village, long ago, that used to acquire young girls [buulyal – 'pre-pubescent'; contrast rugood 'nubile']. In the evening, they would go to another village to take the young girls to their own village. They would stay there that night, talking with them, and in the morning they would find betel nut and drinking coconuts to give them when they returned home.
3. Qeree faqän baay ni yaen ni feek ea buulyal ma baay i yib ea pagäl ma niib ni feek ea buulyal ni gaagang’ mea magëy reeb ni ba qachiichiig, ma ba bitiir. Daariy beaq ni bea yib i guy nga qu ra thiin gow. Qeree yib boechii pagäl ngaak’ ngea gaqar, “Moey nga da paereew qaram nga qu da thiin gow.” Qeree mang yow ea feal’ ea thiin roorow nga qu ra thiin gow ni gubiin ea rraan. Baay reeb ea rraan ni ngea suul fa pi buulyal ni baay ea ti ni ka ni piiq ko fa pi buulyal ni nga fin ra taaw gaed ko binaew rooraed ma yaed f’oeth, ma yugu baay boechii ban’ean ni kea piiq fa rea pagäl ko fa bi neam ea buulyal ngea feek. Qeree goqo qaram ea n’ean ni qu ra riin’eed ea ... mea yib i taeruq fa chii buulyal ni qaram ea kea rugood. Now when they would go to get little girls, the boys would take the older girls and left one who was little and too young. No one came to talk with her. So one boy came to her and said, “Come, let’s go sit over there and talk.” And it happened that they got along well together, and used to talk together every day. Each day, when the other girls were returning home with the things they had been given to share out, there was something that that boy had given for that little girl. So this was what they did regularly until it was close to the time when that little girl would become nubile.
4. Qaram mea yaen fa rea pagäl ngea yaen i yoeg ko chiitamangin fa rea rugood ni qiir ea ngea yaen i toey ea naqun ko fa rea rugood nga dapael. Qaram mea yaen fa rea pagäl nga dapael ngea yaen i toey ea naqun rook’ fa rea rugood. Qaram ma kea paer ni kea figirngiy. Qeree paer nga qii qayuweeg u dapael ni bea fitaeq gaan ma bea fool quchub nuun, ea ... ngea yib i qarow fa chii piin. Qaram ma ka ra maabgol gow, ma yow yaen ra paer-eew nga tafean fa chii pagäl. Then the boy went and spoke to the girl’s father, saying that he was going to go and build a house next to the menstrual house [dapael – where women go during their period] for the girl. The boy went to the menstrual house and built the house for the girl. He stayed there, helping her whilst she was in the menstrual house, getting food and drink for her until she had finished her period. Then the two of them were married, and they lived at the house of the boy.
5. Ma chii pagäl neam ea ba gaafgow. Daariy beaq rook’ ma ku daariy ban’ean u tafean ni ba feal’ ni yi maa kaay, ma chanea ma qaram ma qu ra paer. Yow bea gaafgow, ma chanea yow bea paer ni ba feal’ ni ba feal’ ea thiin roorow. Ri daar maa puw-aen’ ea rea pagäl neam ko rea piin ni figirngin neam. Raa yaen ea rea pagäl neam nga ba yaang nii feal’ waqathaan nga boechii ban’ean ma ri raa mithaeg nga waay rook’ ngea feek nga tabinaew nga ra kaay-eew. Ku raa yaen nga baang ni reeb ea luum, ma tii rook’ ea ggaan ea baay i feek ma qeree qii sapingpingeeg ea ... yaa ngea lunguy ea kea qabiich, mea taay nga waay rook’ ngea feek nga tabinaew nga ra sabaliyeew ea bpiin rook’. Qeree ri ba feal’ ni ba feal’ ea thiin roorow ma dea liiq biqid. However, the boy was poorly-off. He had no relations, and there was no good food in his house; nevertheless, they stayed there. They were very poor, but they were very close to one another. The boy never got angry at that woman his wife. Whenever he would have the good fortune to find something good somewhere, he would put it in his basket and bring it home for them to eat. When he would go somewhere where there was cooking, he would take the food given him and turn it over and over and then say that he had eaten it, but he would put it in his basket and take it home for him and his wife together. So they were very good friends and he never beat her once.
6. Qeree yaen i reeb ea rraan nii gin fa gäl labthir ko fa rea piin ma kea yib faak ea piiluung ni kea feek ea quchub i yib, ngea p’aaw, ngea tagbëy ngea yib i piiq ni gaarow. Qaram mea suul. Baay ni fiith ko maang faan ea ti neam mea gaqar, “Daariy. Boechii ban’ean ni kea feal’ waqathaag ngaay, ma ka gu piiq ni nga mu kaay-eew.” Qeree ra paer, ma kii reeb ea rraan ma kii yib fa rea faak ea piiluung. Ku kea feek boech ea ban’ean, yaa booqor rook’ yaa ba piiluung. Ma kii yib i piiq ni ngea kaay fa gäl i chaaq ni chiitamangin ngea chiitinangin fa rea piin ni kea yaen ko maabgol. Ma ku yow fiith ba yaay, “Maang faan ea ti ney ea n’ean ni yaga ga bea suuluweeg ngoomow, yaa gamow ea daariy boech ban’ean ni gamow raa piiq boech ngoom. Nga moeg laen i n’uum ko n’ean ni ga bea taafinaey naag, yaa raa daariy roomow, ma yi raa guy rogon nga ni niing.” Mea gaqar fa rea faak ea piiluung, “Daangaay. Kea mus ni fa chii piin ni faakmeew ea gu bea taafinaey naag ni nga mu guy-eew rogon ngea chuw ko maabgol rook’ nga gu leqngiy.” Mea lungurow, “Qa, qiir ea yer ea n’ean ni ga ba qadaag. Kea feal’ baay gu guyeew rogon.” Now one day, the parents of the girl were very surprised to be visited by the son of a chief who brought them drinking coconuts, bananas, and other food and gave it to them, and then left. When he was asked what this was about, he said, “No, nothing – I just had good fortune with some of these things and brought them for you to eat.” They rested with that, and on another day the chief’s son came again and again brought things, much of it as he was a chief’s son. He again came and gave them to the parents of the married couple. They asked again, “Why is this that you keep coming back to us; we have no way of repaying you. Tell us what is in your mind, as there really is nothing we can give you in thanksgiving.” The chief’s son said, “It’s not to get something back. It’s that I am hoping you will separate your daughter from her husband so I can marry her.” They replied, “Ah, so that’s what you want. All right, we will see what we can do.”
7. Qaram mea reeb ea qiin fean ma yow muluwol ngea yaen ko fa rea piin ni faakrow ni baay ko maabgol. Roofean nii taaw fa rea muluwol ngaak’ fa rea piin ea dea moey fa rea moqon ni figirngin yaa ka raanoed boech ea pumoqon nga baang nga reeb ea maruweel. Qeree yib fa rea piin ngea yib i guy ea chiitamangin ngea chiitinangin. Mea lungurow ngaak’, “Qaram tin ea gamow bea pining-eem nga raay, yaa qa yugu mu changar boech ko ggaan ni kea yib i piiq ea qa ni faak ea piiluung. Ni bea gaqar ea nga mu guy rogom nga mu chuw ko bi niir ea maabgol, yaa nga mu figirngiy. Ma bi neam ea ba feal’ yaa booqor ban’ean rook’ yaa faak ea piiluung. Qeree ga raa chuw rook’ ea bi ni ba qer ni figirngim ni gimeew bea gaafgow nga mu leqngiy ea rea faak ea piiluung ney, ma raa feal’ rogom riy, ma raa feal’ rogomow riy.” Mea gaqar fa chii piin, “Chiiney ea ri daa gu naang ko maang ea gu raa yoeg ngaak’ figirngig ma gamow wear. Yaa ri ba feal’ ni ba feal’ ea thiin rook’ ngoog, ma daar maa puw-aen’ ngoog, ma daar maa liiq-eeg, ma kea miit taawrengin ea chii gaafgow ni ba qaraay ni gamow bea taay ngoomow. Yaa raa yaen nga baang nii feal’ waqathaan nga boechii ban’ean, ma ri raa feek nga tabinaew nga gu sabaliyeew. Ri daariy ban’ean ni maa mithaeg roog. Ma daariy reeb ea rraan ni maa kirkireeb naag qawochean ngoog. Qeree ri daa gu naang ea n’ean ni gu raa riin’ ngaak’ figirngig ma gamow wear.” Ma yow gaqar ngaak’, “Kea feal’ mu maen, ma ga leam naag ea n’ean ni nga mu riin’ ngaak’ nga mu wear gow nga mu figirngiy ea rea faak ea piiluung ney. Yaa raa feal’ waqathdaed riy.” After a few days, they sent a message to their daughter. The day the message arrived, her husband wasn’t home, because he and some men had gone somewhere to do some work. Thus the girl went and visited her parents. They said to her, “Well, dear, we have called you here to show you all this food that the chief’s son has given us. He wants you to find a way to separate from your husband and marry him. And that would be good because he is very well off, the son of a chief. So if you leave your husband and go and marry the chief’s son, you will be well off, and it will be helpful for us.” But the girl replied, “Now I don’t know what I would say to my husband in order to break us up. He is very, very good to me; never gets angry, doesn’t beat me, and I feel almost attached to our poverty, his and mine. Whenever he goes somewhere and has good luck, he brings something home to me. He never keeps anything from me. He never is sad about me. So I don’t know what I would say to my husband to break us up.” They replied to her, “All right, you go home, but really think of something you can do to marry that chief’s son. We will all prosper as a result.”
8. Qaram mea suul fa chii piin ni kea maath ea liyab ngaak’ yaa dea naang ko maang ea ngea riin’ ko fa rea pagäl ni ri ba feal’ ea thiin roorow. Qeree ku ra paer-eew ea ... ngea yaen reeb ea puul mea deeg fa rea moqon ni figirngin ni ngea yaen ko maleekaag mea gaqar ngaak’, “Chiiney ea raa gabuul ni kadbuul ma daab gu qabiich yaa nga gu waaroed ko maleekaag, ma fin baleayaal’ ea gamaed raa suul.” Mea gaqar fa rea piin, “Kea feal’, baay fin i baleayaal’ boech ma gu luum.” The girl returned, baffled, because she didn’t know what to say to her husband, who was so good to her. They continued to live together, until, one month, her husband set out to go on a trip. He said to her, “Tomorrow morning, I won’t eat anything, because I and some others are going on a trip; we will return that evening.” The wife said, “All right; I won’t cook until the evening.”
9. Qaram ma ku kea madaq ea muluwol ko fa gäl labthir ko fa rea piin ba yaay. Qeree yaen fa rea moqon ko maleekaag mea yaen fa rea piin i guy row. Mea lungurow, “Chiiney ea ka gamow bea poeng, yaa qa mu changar boech ko ggaan ni ku keab i piiq fa rea faak ea piiluung. Maang ea ka mu riin’ ni kea n’uw nap’an ma daawor mu suuluweeg taban ea thiin ngoomow?” Mea gaqar fa rea piin, “Ma ri daar yog ni nga gu noon ko fa rea moqon roog, yaa ri ba feal’ ea puruuy’ rook’ ngoog.” Mea gaqar fa rea chiitinangin, “Mu maen ma ga liith ea rafung ni daab i n’ag nga mu piiq i qunum, ngea k’ädk’aed l’ugun. Goomang mea puw-aen’ ngoom ngea liiq-eem ma ga miil rook’ nga muub. Ma ga figirngiy ea rea faak ea piiluung ney, yaa qiir ea raay ea gi ni raa feal’ rogodaed riy.” Ma chii piin neam ea ku ba llow-aen’, ku dabuun ni ngea n’aeg ea thiin ko chiitamangin ngea chiitinangin. Qaram mea suul nga tabinaew roorow fa rea moqon ni figirngin. So a message arrived from her parents to the girl again. The man went on his trip, and the girl went to see them. They said to her, “We have called you again, so you can see again all the food that chief’s son has brought. Why have you been so long without answering us?” The girl replied, “I really can’t talk to my husband about it, because he is so kind to me.” Her mother said, “Go and cook some rafung [kind of sweet taro leaves] and give it to him undercooked; it will make him sick to his stomach. Perhaps he will then get angry at you and beat you and you can run away from him and come here. You can marry this chief’s son, for in this way we will all be well off.” The girl was very smart, but she didn’t want to disregard the words of her father and mother. She returned to her and her husband’s home.
10.Qeree yaen i feek ea rafung ngea liith ni dea n’ag, ma kea baleayaal’ boech mea ngoongoliy rogon ngea taay. Qeree yib fa chii chaaq ni figirngin ni kea magaer ko maleekaag mea yaen i piiq ngaak’. Qeree yib i paer ngaay nga qii qunum. Qeree faqän i qunum ma gowaa ni raeg ba gaagëy nga laan i yil ko mak’adk’aad ni kea madaq nga laan loelugean. Bea yib ea matuul u p’eethunguun ngea luuq, u laen miit, ma bea qathmagil ngea qunum fa chii rafung, ma bea choochol. Bea qunum ni gowaa ban’ean ni daar mak’adk’aad l’ugun. Qeree kea paer fa chii piin bea guy, ma faqän i guy ni qaram ea n’ean ni bea riin’, mea paag lamaan nga laang ngea yoer. Ma gaqar fa rea moqon, “Maang ea ka mu yoer naag?” Mea gaqar, “Ka gu yoer yaa ka gu runguy-eem ko pi n’ean niir ni ga bea kaay ni ri ga bea qathmagiliy i kaay, ma daariy ban’ean ni ga bea yoeg riy. Ma n’ean niir ea ka noeg ngoog u tafënmaed ni nga gu piiq mu koey nga gu k’ar chaam ngoom nga da chaam gow. Yaa nga da wear gow yaa nga gu figirngiy faak ea piiluung, yaa kea m’aay naag ea chiitamaag ngea chiitinaeg gaan ea chaaq ni ba qaram ni faak ea piiluung.” Mea gaqar fa rea moqon, “Daab ku mu yoer yaa ba feal’ yaa lunguun ea chiitamangim ngea chiitinangim ni daab mu paag. Baay i gabuul ma gadow yaen da guy-eew row. Ma chanea nga mu guy rogon reeb ea bpiin nga mu m’aag taban nga qii liith boechi yaang ea ban’ean gu waay.” She went and took some rafung and undercooked it, and in the evening set it aside. Her poor husband came, tired from the journey, and she gave it to him to eat. When he ate it, it was as though someone had pushed a huskingstick into his stomach, for the pain, which went all the way to his head. Mucus came out of his nose and tears from his eyes, but he strove to eat it, though he was coughing. He ate it as though it didn’t burn him. His wife sat looking at him, and when she saw what he was doing, she lifted up her voice and wept. Her husband said, “What are you crying about?” She said, “I am crying because I feel sorry for you, struggling to eat that, and saying nothing about it. I gave you that because in my parents’ house they told me to give you something to eat that would make strife between us two. That was so we would separate and I would go and marry the chief’s son, because my parents had used up all the food that the chief’s son had given them.” The husband said, “Don’t cry, it’s all right; it’s right that you should not ignore the wishes of your parents. Tomorrow we will go and see them. But you must arrange for a woman to cook for me.”
11.Qeree yaen i kadbuul u reeb ea rraan mea yaen fa rea piin i m’aag tabanggin reeb ea bpiin ni ngea figirngiy fa rea moqon. Qaram ma yow yaen nga tafean fa chii piin ni ngea figirngiy faak ea piiluung. Ra taaw gow mea gaqar fa rea moqon, “Ka gu bow yaa kea chaachaelubaan ea chaaq ney. Ngea paer boech u roey, ma baay kii gabuul fa langilaeth ma ka guub gu guy.” Qaram ma kea falfal-aen’row, “Kea feal’ tooq. Qaram ea mu maen, ma baay kii reeb ea rraan ma ka ga yib.” Therefore the next morning, the woman went and arranged for a woman to be her husband’s new wife. Then they went to the home of the woman who was to marry the chief’s son. They arrived, and the man said, “We have come because my wife is unhappy. She will stay here with you, and then tomorrow or the next day, I will come back and see how she is.” This made them happy. “All right, friend. You go and come back in a couple of days.”
12.Qaram mea paer fa chii piin ni ka rii kireeb-aen’ mea gaqar ko chiitamangin ngea chiitinangin, “Qaram ea nga mu maarow mu noonow ko fa rea faak ea piiluung nga gu maabgol gow.” Qaram ma ni muluwol ngea yaen ko fa rea faak ea piiluung ngea yib nga raanow fa chii piin. Qaram mea yib nga ra nonaed ngea muuq ma ni t’aer yaraan ea madnam. The woman was very unhappy, but she said to her father and mother, “Now you can go and tell the chief’s son that he and I will get married.” They sent a message to the chief’s son that he should come and go away with the woman. He came and they talked and settled a date for the wedding.
13.Faqän ra taaw gow nga tafean fa rea faak ea piiluung ma kea neap’. Qeree raanow nga naqun mea yaen fa rea pagäl i k’oereeg ea nifiy nga moqawaat. Ma faqän i qaf fa rea nifiy nii changar fa rea piin ma goqo yuu duug ea duqög ni ka ni gaed ni gaed, ma qer rogon ea p’aaw ni ka ni m’aag ni m’aag nga laang ni kea loel. Mea gaqar fa rea pagäl, “Chiiney ea nga da languy-eew ea p’aaw.” Mea gaqar fa chii piin, “Gaeg ea daab ku gu qabiich boech yaa kea n’uw ea neap’.” Qaram ma yow paer. When they arrived at the chief’s son’s house, it was nighttime. They went into the house and the young man went and kindled a fire on the hearth. When the fire blazed up, the woman looked and saw basket after basket of yams lined up, and bunch after bunch of ripe bananas hanging up. The young man said, “Let’s have some bananas,” but the girl replied, “as for me, I won’t eat now because it’s too late.” So they settled down.
14.Qeree guy fa chii piin fean i falaaqab fa rea faak ea piiluung, ma ri gowaa yi bea m’aag fa bi ni ba qaram ea pumoqon ni figirngin ni yow ba gaafgow nga laan i yaen’ ni ka rii kireeb i kireeb-aen’. Ka qaram ma daa kii qabiich fa chii piin. Baay i kadbuul ma ni piiq ea ggaan rook’ ni ngea liith. Mea liith ngea muuq ma baay daab ku ni guy mea yaen i puqög nga taan ea dooq. The girl saw the wealth of the chief’s son, and she felt as though this had emphasised in her mind how poor she and her husband were, and it made her sadder than sad. So the woman stopped eating. In the morning they gave her food to cook. She cooked it but no one saw that she poured it out in the rubbish heap.
15.Qeree yaen i taaw nga yaraan fa rea madnam ma kea noon fa rea faak ea piiluung nga ba yaang ni nga ni piiq ea ggaan, ma ba yaang ea niig, ma ba yaang ea quchub, ma ba yaang ea ngea piiq ea p’aaw. Raa ba yaang ma ni piiq reeb ea ban’ean riy. Qeree ni moqolung ni nga ni ngoongoliy ea rea m’aag paaq neam. Ku dea qun fa chii piin ko qabiich yaa faqän raa guy fean i feal’ ea pi ggaan neam ma qii taawreeng naag fean ra gaafgow gow fa bi neam ea pumoqon ni figirngin ni yow ba gaafgow. The day of the wedding arrived. The chief’s son sent out the word for people to bring food, fish, drinking coconut, and bananas. Each group of people gave something. The meeting happened for this wedding. But the woman didn’t go to eat, because when she saw how good the food was, it made her sad at how poor her first husband was and how poor they had been.
16.Qeree qaram ea n’ean ni qii riin’ ni gubiin ea rraan ni daa qii qabiich ea ... ma qaram ea kea tagaan i yaen, kea qachiig i yaen. Mea fiith fa rea faak ea piiluung, “Ma chiiney ea ka mu diqin?” Mea gaqar, “Ma daa gu naang. Kea yib ba m’aar ngoog ni daa gu naang ko maang m’aar.” N’uw boech nap’an mea taeruq mea yaen nga dapael, ma ku kea luw fa bi neam ea bpiin ni ba qaram nii yaen i m’aag tabanggin ngea figirngiy fa rea moqon ni qu ra maabgol gow ni soomm’oon. Qeree ra madaq gow nga dapael, mea gaqar fa bi neam ea bpiin ngaak’, “Moeg, maang ea ka mu riin’ ni ka ri mu qachiig?” Mea gaqar, “Ma daa gu naang ea n’ean ni ka gu riin’.” It went on like that for days with her not eating, and she began to get thinner and more sickly looking. The chief’s son asked, “Now what’s the matter with you?” She replied, “I don’t know. I have got some sort of sickness – I don’t know what sort. Time went on and it was almost time for her period, and at the same time the woman she had got for her first husband also began her period. The two of them thus met together in the menstrual house, and the one woman said to the other, “Say, what has happened to you that you are so thin?” She replied, “I don’t know what’s wrong.”
17.Qeree qu ra paer-eew u dapael. Qeree faqän baay i yib ea ggaan u tafean fa rea faak ea piiluung ni ba p’aaw fa l’agruw, ngea quchub ngea mareaw ngea ggaan ni maenigil ngea qachif, mea feek ngea taay ni daar gaqar-aen’ ni ngea kaay. Ma baay i yib gaan fa bi neam ea bpiin ma boechquw, ma ba tagtagaan. Qeree gaqar ngaak’, “Mu feek boech ea ti ni ba qaraay ea ggaan ni ba maenigil nga mu koey.” Mea gaqar fa bi neam ea bpiin, “Ma faqän raa ba m’aag-aen’uum ko ti ney ea ggaan ma ga feek boech mu koey.” The two women stayed at the menstrual house. When food arrived from the chief’s son, a bunch or two of bananas, drinking coconuts, copra, good food with coconut wine, she took it with no inclination to eat it. When food came for the other woman, it was poor and very little. She said to her, “Take some of this good food and eat it.” The other woman said, “Well, if you are attracted to this food of mine, you eat it.”
18.Qeree qaram ea ti ni qii kaay boech. Ma ku baay ea qachif riy ni qii th’aeb fa rea moqon ni qu ra maabgol gow ni soomm’oon, qeree faqän raa feek mea farëy boen toogafaan fa rea daag ni ka baay boen doewngin fa rea pagäl riy. Ma qeree qii feek toogafaan nga qii yip’ nga laan fa rea daag nga qii doedoqöy. Mea gaqar fa bi neam ea bpiin, “Maang ea ka mu riin’ ni daa muur qunum ma ga bea doedoqöy toogafaan fa rea daag?” Ma qaram mea yoer mea gaqar, “Chiiney ea qaraay saalapeeg, nga guum’ ni bachaan ea rea pagäl roodow ney ni dea chuwaen’mow roomow mea chuweeg-eeg ea chiitamaag ngea chiitinaeg. Yow ba qadaag faak ea piiluung yaa qaram ea gi ni raa feal’ rogomaed riy. Qeree gaeg ea baay guum’.” So that is what she ate a little of. There was also coconut wine that the first husband had made, and when she took it, she smelt the odour of the cords of the basket that still smelt of her first husband. She took the cords of the basket and sucked on them. The other woman said to her, “Why are you not drinking the coconut wine, but you are sucking the basket?” Then she wept and said, “Now this is how things are with me. I’m going to die because of that man from whom I have never been parted in my heart, but my parents separated me from him. They want the chief’s son because he will make us wealthy. But as for me, I think I’m going to die!”
19.Qeree ra chuw gow u dapael, mea qun fa bi neam ea bpiin ngaak’ nga tafean ea piiluung nga qii taliiliy naag. Qaram mea yoeg fa rea piin ni kea m’aar ko fa bi neam ea bpiin ni ngea yaen i guy beaq nga ra tunguy-eew ea dafeal’ roorow fa bi neam ea moqon ni ra maabgol gow ni soomm’oon. Dafeal’ ko gaafgow roorow ni qu ra taay-eew ko soomm’oon i yib. Ngea marungaqagean ea maabgol roorow faak ea piiluung ni dea m’aagaen’ ngaay. Qeree ni tunguy fa rea dafeal’ ni fearow. When they left the menstrual house, the other woman went with her to the chief’s house to take care of her. She said that she had become ill from the other woman, who was going to go find someone to compose a song of said love about her and her first husband. It was a song about how sad things were for them. And about her marriage to the chief’s son whom she didn’t want to marry. They made that song about them.
20.Qeree reeb ea rraan mea yoeg ko fa bi neam ea bpiin ni nga yigii pining fa rea moqon nga ra madaq gaed. Qeree yaen fa bi neam ea bpiin ngea baleayaal’ ma yow yib. Qeree yib fa rea piin ngea yib i poeliy fa rea m’aar nga raanow nga fidik’ ea lumar ni suusun ea yi bea gaayiy ea nifeeng. Qeree ra paer-eew nga qu ra yoer gow ngoorow. Mea gaqar fa rea moqon, “Kea feal’ ma daariy ea n’ean ni gadow raa riin’ ngaay yaa lunguun ea chiitamaam ngea chiitinaem. Ma gu bea taamadaag ko rea tabinaew ney, yaa tafean ea piiluung.” Mea gaqar fa chii piin, “Kea feal’ nga daarow nga laan i yaen’ ea chiitamaag ngea chiitinaeg. Ma nga mu maen yaa baay i gabuul fa langilaeth ma ka guum’.” One day he said to that woman that she should go call the man so he could meet him. She went one evening and the two of them came back. The woman came and supported the sick one out into the dark as though there were going to try to get some fresh air. They stayed there weeping about themselves. The man said, “Well, but there is nothing we can about it because it is the will of your parents. And I am afraid of this house because it is a chief’s house.” The woman said, “All right, we will go according to my parents’ will. But you go away, because tomorrow or the next day, I will have died.”
21.Qeree qaram ea n’ean nii riin’, yaen i taaw nga reeb ea langilaeth mea qaaw ea faan rook’ fa chii piin qadow. Qeree wear ea thiin riy ni kea yim’ leqngin faak ea piiluung ma niib. Qeree yaen i yin’ fa bi neam ea bpiin ni qii taliiliy naag ngea fa bi ni ra tunguy-eew fa rea dafeal’. Qaram ma fin ni naang faan ni kea yim’ fa chii piin. And that is what happened. After a few days, the poor woman breathed her last. The word went out that the wife of the chief’s son had died, and everyone came. The other woman came along who had cared for her, and the one who had composed the song. That was how everyone knew the woman had died.
22.Qeree qaraay marungaqagean ea maabgol ni ni m’aag ni daa ni yaen nga laan i yaen’ faakëy ma ni piiq ko maabgol. Qeree ri ba feal’ ni nga qii fiith ea gäl labthir laan i yaen’ ea bitiir ko maabgol. Yaa rii chëy mea yaen i buuch ni boed ea rea yaat ney. This is the story then of a marriage in which those who gave them in marriage didn’t go according to the mind of their daughter. It is good, then, that parents consult the hearts of their children in marriage, lest things go as they have in this story.
23.Kea mus. The end.

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Reeb ea Yaat ko Maabgol - Story of a Married Couple

Yapese Text 4

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